British Weapon Systems - Technical data and discussion

This is a thread for discussing and collecting information on British Weapon Systems, and other weapons used by Britain. It’s primarily focussed on the post-war to present day period, but discussion of earlier weapons is also welcome. Below you will find a summary of the information collected on different British weapons so far. If you see anything incorrect or out of date then let me know. I’ll try to keep this main post up to date as more information is found.


Guns

20 mm Hispano

To do

20 mm GAU-4

To do

30 mm ADEN

To do

25 mm ADEN

To do

27 mm BK-27

To do


Air-to-air missiles

Fireflash

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Summary

The Fireflash was Britain’s first air-to-air missile, it uses radar beam riding for guidance. It is a rather of looking missile consisting of a central missile body containing the warhead and guidance systems, and two rocket boosters which detach after burning out. This design was chosen due to the (later proven incorrect) belief that the hot rocket exhaust would block the missiles guidance signals if the rocket motor was mounted in the main missile body.

The beam riding guidance (and general design) of the Fireflash made it an extremely limited weapon. Nevertheless it entered service in 1957 and began to be withdrawn the following year when the far more capable Firestreak entered service.

Tech specs

  • Length: 2.84 m (with boosters)
  • Finspan: 74 cm
  • Diameter: 15 cm
  • Weight: 140 kg
  • Speed: Mach 2 - 2.4 maximum
  • Propulsion: Two solid rocket motor (detach after burnout)
    • 1.5 s burn time
  • Guidance duration: Unknown (7-10 second typical flight time to target is mentioned)
  • Warhead: Blast fragmentation warhead
    • Proximity fuse
  • Beam riding guidance
  • Manoeuvring capability: Very limited
  • Launch range: 6,000 - 10,000 ft
  • Rear aspect only

Used by

  • Swift F.7
  • Meteor NF.11 (trials only)
  • Hunter F.4 (trials only)

Pictures

Click me A Fireflash missile:

A Fireflash missile next to a Swift FR.5 (only the Swift F.7 used the Fireflash):

Sources

  • The Early Development of Guided Weapons in the United Kingdom, 1940-1960 by Stephen Robert Twigge
  • Fireflash to Skyflash: A History of Air to Air Missile Firings in the Royal Air Force 1952 to 2002 by Mike Hollingsworth & Gordon Campbell
  • Swift Justice: The Full Story of the Supermarine Swift by Nigel Walpole

Firestreak

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Summary

The Firestreak was Britain’s second operational air-to-air missile. It utilised IR guidance and was a significant improvement over the Fireflash in every respect.

Tech specs

  • Length: 3.19 m
  • Finspan: 75 cm
  • Diameter: 22 cm
  • Weight: 136 kg
  • Speed: Mach 1.6 above launch speed
  • Propulsion: “Magpie” solid rocket motor
    • 1.9 s burn time
  • Guidance duration: 13 seconds
  • Warhead: 23 kg blast-fragmentation with 8.75 kg RDX/TNT (60/40)
    • Proximity fuse radius: 12.2 m (40 ft)
  • IR Seeker:
    • FOV: 5°
    • Gimbal limit: 30°
    • Pre-launch gimbal limit: 5°
    • Tracking rate: Unknown
    • Cooling: Liquid ammonia & compressed air
  • Manoeuvring capability: 15g
  • Rear aspect only

Used by

  • Javelin FAW.7 / 8 / 9
  • Venom NF.2
  • Sea Venom FAW.22
  • English Electric Lightning (all versions)
  • Sea Vixen FAW.1 / 2
  • CA-27 Sabre Mk.30 (trials only)
  • Canberra B.2 (trials only)
  • P1109B (prototype)

Pictures

Click me Firestreak missile diagram:

A Firestreak missile being prepared for loading:

Sources

  • ADM 1/28039 FIRESTREAK air-to-air guided weapon: acceptance trials report and lethality assessment
  • AP 101B-1003, 5 & 6-15B Lightning F.3, T.5, F.6 Aircrew Manual - Weapons System
  • BAC 53-(SA)-6 Lightning F.53 Pilots Notes
  • AP3456H Royal Air Force Manual of Flying - Volume H: Aircraft Weapons Employment
  • Fireflash to Skyflash: A History of Air to Air Missile Firings in the Royal Air Force 1952 to 2002 by Mike Hollingsworth & Gordon Campbell

Red Top

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Summary

The Red Top missile was designed to be a significantly improved version of the Firestreak. Work began with a design study in 1956 (with full development starting in 1957) under the name “Blue Jay Mk 4” (Firestreak was originally called “Blue Jay”), which was soon changed to “Red Top”. The finished missile improved upon the Firestreak in just about every respect: the IR seeker was vastly improved (having far better gimbal limits and being capable of all aspect locks against supersonic or afterburning targets), the warhead was larger and of a more damaging continuous rod type, and the rocket motor was improved, among other changes.

Tech specs

  • Length: 3.2 m
  • Finspan: 91 cm
  • Diameter: 22.5 cm
  • Weight: 168 kg
  • Speed: Mach 1.7 above launch speed
  • Propulsion: “Linnet” solid rocket motor
    • ~8,000 lbf for 2.5 s burn time
  • Guidance duration: 30 seconds
  • Warhead: 29.5 kg continuous rod with 18.14 kg of RDX/TNT (60/40)
    • Rod radius 6.4 m (21 ft)
    • Proximity fuse radius: 6 m (20 ft)
  • IR Seeker:
    • FOV: 2°
    • Gimbal limit: 60°
    • Pre-launch gimbal limit: 30°
    • Tracking rate: 12°/s
    • Cooling: Pure Air
  • Manoeuvring capability: 12g (possibly 16g combined plane)
  • All aspect against supersonic or afterburning targets

Used by

  • Sea Vixen FAW.1 XJ476 (development aircraft)
  • Sea Vixen FAW.2
  • Lightning F.3 / F.3A / T.5 / F.6 / F.53 / T.55

Pictures

Click me Red Top missile diagram:

A Red Top acquisition missile on a trolley (with launching shoe attached):

A Lightning F.6 fitted with a Red Top missile:

Sources

  • BAC 53-(SA)-6 Lightning F.53 Pilots Notes
  • DEFE 69/489 RED TOP/SIDEWINDER missiles on PHANTOM F4 aircraft
  • AIR 20/12527 Red Top Missile System Final release To Service
  • AIR 16/1468 Fighter Command Trials Unit - Trial No 3 Rear Hemisphere Attacks with Red Top Against Subsonic Targets at Medium and Low Levels
  • DSIR 23/30521 Evaluation of Lightning/AI 23B/RED TOP weapon system
  • AVIA 6-25359 An assessment of decoy-flare effectiveness for the protection of tactical strike aircraft against air/air infra-red guided weapons
  • AVIA 13/1320 RED TOP infra-red homing head for air-to-air guided missile: mathematical model
  • AP3456H Royal Air Force Manual of Flying - Volume H: Aircraft Weapons Employment
  • AD0349208 - THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE LINNET SOLID PROPELLENT ROCKET MOTOR
  • Fireflash to Skyflash: A History of Air to Air Missile Firings in the Royal Air Force 1952 to 2002 by Mike Hollingsworth & Gordon Campbell

Taildog / SRAAM

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Summary

In 1968 a team of engineers working at Hawker Siddeley Dynamics began work on a new short-range thrust-vectoring air-to-air missile; the company funded the project as a private venture under the name “Taildog”. The missile was to have an IR seeker with a wide field of view and would have to be extremely manoeuvrable. In 1970, the Ministry of Defence decided that a new air-to-air missile with better manoeuvrability than the other missiles that were in service at the time was required. Hawker Siddeley Dynamics adapted their Taildog missile design to meet the new requirements and after evaluation, they were award the contract in 1972. Development continued under the name SRAAM with two versions of the final missile being proposed, the SRAAM 75 and SRAAM 100. The SRAAM 100 was a more advanced missile which aimed to improve various aspects of the design, while SRAAM 75 was to be largely similar to the experimental SRAAM missiles. Due to budget cuts, the government cancelled the SRAAM development in 1974, however the programme continued however until 1978 as a technology demonstrator.

Tech specs

  • Length:
    • Taildog 2.00 m
    • SRAAM: 2.75 m
  • Finspan: 32 cm
  • Diameter:
    • Taildog 16 cm
    • SRAAM: 16.5 cm
  • Weight:
    • Taildog 50 kg
    • SRAAM: 70 kg
  • Speed: Unknown
  • Propulsion: Thrust vectoring solid rocket motor
  • Guidance duration: At least 6 seconds
  • Warhead: Unknown
  • IR Seeker:
    • FOV: Unknown
    • Gimbal limit: Unknown
    • Pre-launch gimbal limit: Unknown
    • Tracking rate: Unknown
    • Cooling: Unknown
  • Manoeuvring capability: Very high
  • Limited front aspect capability

Used by

  • Hunter F.6 (SRAAM - trials only)
  • Harrier T.52 (SRAAM - trials only)
  • Sea Vixen FAW.1 (Taildog - photographed with missiles next to it)

Pictures

Click me SRAAM mock-up:

SRAAM launch tubes:

Sources

  • DEFE 72/154 SKYFLASH air-to air guided missile (XJ 521, AST 1219): historical papers
    • Ministry of Defence Operational Requirements Committee: Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile - AST 1219 & Short Range Air-to-Air Missile - ASR 1222
  • AVIA 6-25359 An assessment of decoy-flare effectiveness for the protection of tactical strike aircraft against air/air infra-red guided weapons
  • British Defence Equipment Catalogue - Third Edition - October 1970
  • British Secret Projects: Hypersonics, Ramjets and Missiles by Chris Gibson and Tony Buttler

AIM-9 Sidewinder

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Summary

The Sidewinder family of missiles have their own dedicated thread, so I won’t cover them in detail here. Britain used the AIM-9B, AIM-9D, AIM-9G, AIM-9L, AIM-9Li, and AIM-9M models of the Sidewinder. The AIM-9Li was an AIM-9L upgraded by German company Bodenseewerk Gerätetechnik (BGT) to include flare rejection. According to a US report it offered the “same capability” as the AIM-9M-5/6.

Britain also made a few of it’s own modifications to the AIM-9L Sidewinder. The first was the AIM-9L SWIFT which added some form of flare rejection (information on the SWIFT is virtually non-existent). The other was the “de-chirped” AIM-9L, by modifying the LAU-7 launch rail the British were able to bypass the “chirp” mechanic of the AIM-9L which apparently doubled their lock-on range under some conditions.

Tech specs

Used by

  • Scimitar F.1 (AIM-9B)
  • Buccaneer S.2 (AIM-9B)
  • Buccaneer S.2B (AIM-9B / G / L)
  • Hawk T.1A (AIM-9G / L)
  • Phantom FG.1 / FGR.2 / F-4J (UK) (AIM-9D / G / L)
  • Tornado GR.1 (AIM-9G / L)
  • Tornado F.2 (AIM-9B / G / L)
  • Tornado F.3 (AIM-9G / L / Li)
  • Tornado GR.4 (AIM-9L*)
  • Typhoon DA2 (AIM-9L*)
  • Typhoon F.2 (AIM-9L*)
  • Harrier GR.3 / GR.5 (AIM-9G / L)
  • Harrier GR.7 / 7A (AIM-9G / L* / M)
  • Harrier GR.9 / 9A (AIM-9L* / M)
  • Sea Harrier FRS.1 (AIM-9G / L)
  • Sea Harrier FA.2 (AIM-9L / M)
  • Jaguar GR.1 / 1A / 3 / 3A (AIM-9G / L*)
  • Nimrod MR.2 / MRA.4 (AIM-9G / L*)

*Might have got AIM-9Li

**This list gives versions I know were used. Aircraft with only AIM-9L could probably use AIM-9G as well, but I can’t prove they did so in service.

Pictures

Click me AIM-9G / AIM-9L missile diagram:

A Scimitar F.1 carrying AIM-9B Sidewinder missiles:

A Phantom FG.1 carrying AIM-9D missiles:

A Nimrod MR.2 carrying AIM-9G missiles:

A Tornado F.3 carrying AIM-9L missiles:

A Sea Harrier FA.2 carrying AIM-9M missiles:

Sources

  • CTTO/6/17/AIR CTTO Tornado F.3 Tactics Manual
  • CTTO/6/11/AIR AWC Tornado GR.1 Tactics Manual
  • CTTO/6/5/AIR CTTO Jaguar Tactics Manual
  • CTTO/6/1/AIR CTTO Phantom Tactical Manual Volume II
  • CD101B-0901 & 2-15D Supplement to Phantom FG.1 & FGR.2 Aircrew Manual - Weapon System (1977 & 1980 Radar Modification Standards)
  • CD101B-0903-15B Supplement to Phantom F-4J Aircrew Manual - Weapon System
  • Air Historical Branch (RAF) Narrative: THE ROYAL AIR FORCE IN OPERATION GRANBY, THE FIRST GULF WAR, 1990-1991 TORNADO F3
  • AFCEA Signal Magazine September 1994 edition
  • ADA278261 Armaments Coproduction at a Crossroads. U.S. Policy Options After the Cold War.

AIM-7 Sparrow

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Summary

The Sparrow family probably deserve their own thread so I won’t cover them in detail here. Britain used the AIM-7E, AIM-7E-2, and AIM-7E-3 versions of the Sparrow. Rather than adopt later versions of the Sparrow Britain opted to develop the Skyflash instead.

Tech specs

  • Hopefully covered in a future post

Used by

  • Phantom FG.1 / FGR.2 (AIM-7E / E-2 / E-3)
  • F-4J(UK) (could use AIM-7E / E-2 / E-3, but probably only used Skyflash in British service)

Pictures

Click me AIM-7E Sparrow Missile Diagram:

A Phantom FGR.2 carrying AIM-7E-2/3 missiles:

Sources

  • CTTO/6/1/AIR CTTO Phantom Tactical Manual Volume II
  • CD101B-0901 & 2-15D Supplement to Phantom FG.1 & FGR.2 Aircrew Manual - Weapon System (1977 & 1980 Radar Modification Standards)
  • CD101B-0903-15B Supplement to Phantom F-4J Aircrew Manual - Weapon System
  • AP3456H Royal Air Force Manual of Flying - Volume H: Aircraft Weapons Employment
  • Fireflash to Skyflash: A History of Air to Air Missile Firings in the Royal Air Force 1952 to 2002 by Mike Hollingsworth & Gordon Campbell

Skyflash

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Summary

The Skyflash was a British improved version of the AIM-7E-2 missile. The main improvement was a new inverse monopulse seeker, which made the missile far more reliable than the Sparrow and also gave better low altitude capability and countermeasures resistance. The Skyflash also received an actual proximity use (earlier Sparrow versions didn’t actually have one; instead they used the seeker head to determine when to detonate the warhead, which made them prone to detonating at the wrong time). The Skyflash was capable of intercepting targets flying at an altitude of 100 ft (33 m)

The SkyflashTEMP was a Skyflash modified to allow it to be used wit the Tornado F.3s missile launchers; it is essentially identical to the regular Skyflash but has no launch G restrictions. The Skyflash SuperTEMP was an mid-life upgrade to improve the performance of the missile. The main addition was a new boost sustain rocket motor giving it much more range than previous models (but possibly not quite as much range as the AIM-7F). Other minor improvements of the SuperTEMP were more streamlined cable ducts, and thinner wings, further improving range.

Tech specs

  • Length: 3.66 m
  • Finspan: 102.3 cm
  • Diameter: 20.3 cm
  • Weight: 195.04 kg
  • Speed: Mach 4 (or about Mach 2.8 above launch speed)
  • Propulsion (Skyflash & Skyflash TEMP): Rocketdyne MK 38 or Bristol Aerojet MK 52 solid rocket
    • 7,600 lbf for 2.9 s burn time
  • Propulsion (Skyflash SuperTEMP): Bristol Aerojet Hoopoe solid rocket motor
    • Boost motor burns for 3 seconds
    • Sustain motor burns for 4 seconds
  • Guidance duration: 75 seconds
  • Warhead: 39 kg (86 lb) MK 71 continuous rod with 8.1 kg (17.9 lb) of PBXN-4
    • Rod radius 9.3 m (30.5 ft)
    • Proximity fuse radius:15.25 m (50 ft)
  • Semi-active radar seeker:
    • Gimbal limit: 46°
    • Tracking rate: 44°/s
    • Maximum lock range (2m2 target): 37 km (20 nm)
    • Inverse monopulse design
  • Manoeuvring capability: 25g
  • Minimum launch altitude: 33 m (100 ft)
  • Minimum target altitude: 33 m (100 ft)

Used by

  • Phantom FG.1 / FGR.2 / F-4J(UK) (Skyflash)
  • Tornado F.2 (Skyflash TEMP)
  • Tornado F.3 (Skyflash TEMP / SuperTEMP)
  • EAP (dummy weapons only)

Pictures

Click me Skyflash missile diagram:

A Tornado F.3 carrying Skyflash missiles:

Sources

  • CTTO Tornado F.3 Tactics Manual
  • DEFE 72/154 SKYFLASH air-to air guided missile (XJ 521, AST 1219): historical papers
  • CD101B-0901 & 2-15D Supplement to Phantom FG.1 & FGR.2 Weapon System Manual
  • CD101B-0903-15B Supplement to Phantom F-4J(UK) Weapon System Manual
  • DEFE 72/205 SKYFLASH missile: Controller of Aircraft (CA) release trials; Phantom FG1 and FGR2 aircraft
  • AP3456H Royal Air Force Manual of Flying - Volume H: Aircraft Weapons Employment
  • Fireflash to Skyflash: A History of Air to Air Missile Firings in the Royal Air Force 1952 to 2002 by Mike Hollingsworth & Gordon Campbell
  • Forecast international report on the Skyflash missile
  • Jane’s International Defense Review 1979: Vol 12 Iss 6 - Page 953
  • AD0335620 - DEVELOPMENT OF THE MK 38 MOD 0 CONTINUOUS ROD WARHEAD FOR THE SPARROW III AIR-TO-AIR MISSILE

AIM-120 AMRAAM

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Summary

The AIM-120 AMRAAM (Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile) is an American beyond-visual-range air-to-air missile, the most popular such missile in the world. Britain originally purchased it for the Sea harrier FA.2, with later versions being used on the Tornado F.3, Typhoon and F-35B. The AMRAAM is fed information about the target before launch, after launch the missile uses inertial navigation to fly towards the target’s predicted location, once close to the target it uses MPRF Active Radar Homing for terminal guidance. The accuracy of AMRAAM can be substantially improved if the aircraft provides it with mid-course guidance updates over data-link.

The AMRAAM family of missiles have their own dedicated thread which you can see for more information.

Tech specs

Used by

  • Sea Harrier FA.2 (AIM-120A / B) - Reliable sources state AIM-120B was used, but an AIM-120A training missile has been photographed on a Sea Harrier.
  • Tornado F.3 (AIM-120B / C-5)
  • Typhoon DA2 / F.2 / FGR.4 (AIM-120B / C-5)
  • F-35B (AIM-120C-5)

Pictures

Click me AIM-120 AMRAAM missile diagram:

A Sea Harrier FA.2 carrying an AIM-120A training missile:

Two Tornado F.3s carrying AIM-120 AMRAAM missiles:

Sources

ASRAAM

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Summary

The ASRAAM (Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missile) is an advanced British heat seeking missile, which uses an imaging infrared seeker. A key feature of the ASRAAM is it’s ability to Lock-On After Launch, meaning the target’s location can be fed to the missile, it is then fired without a lock and manoeuvres to allow itself to lock on to the target; this means the AMRAAM can be fired at targets located behind the firing aircraft.

Tech specs

  • Length: 2.928 m
  • Finspan: 46.5 cm
  • Diameter: 16.6 cm
  • Weight: 88.91 kg
  • Speed: Over Mach 3
  • Propulsion: Solid rocket motor
  • Guidance duration: Unknown
  • Warhead: Blast fragmentation warhead
  • IR Seeker:
    • FOV: Unknown
    • Gimbal limit: 90°
    • Pre-launch gimbal limit: 90° (can be launched against targets 360° around aircraft using LOAL mode)
    • Tracking rate: Unknown
    • Cooling: Nitrogen or Pure air
    • Imaging infrared design
  • Manoeuvring capability: 50g (rumoured)
  • Maximum launch range: In excess of 25 km (according to MBDA), up to 50 km (according to secondary sources)
  • All aspect

Used by

  • Tornado F.3 / GR.4
  • Typhoon DA2 / F.2 / FGR.4
  • F-35B
  • Harrier GR.5 / 7 / 9 (trials only)
  • Jaguar GR.3A (trials only)

Pictures

Click me ASRAAM missile diagram:

A Tornado F.3 carrying ASRAAM missiles:

A Tornado GR.4 carrying ASRAAM missiles:

A Harrier GR.7 Carrying ASRAAM missiles:

A Harrier GR.9 Carrying ASRAAM missiles:

A Jaguar GR.3A carrying ASRAAM missiles:

Sources

Meteor

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Summary

Meteor is the latest air-to-air missile to enter British service. It is an active radar homing missile with inertial / data link mid-course guidance. While the performance details of the missile are largely classified it is believed to be one of the longest ranged air-to-air missiles in the world. The Meteor is unique among air-to-air missiles in that it uses a throttleable ramjet engine for propulsion, instead of a traditional rocket motor. Most missiles have to use their motor to accelerate to a high speed after launch, and then lose speed (and thus manoeuvrability) through the remainder of their flight. By comparison the meteor can throttle it’s engine down while cruising to the target (saving fuel), and then throttle it back up and accelerate to it’s maximum speed as it approaches the target. This substantially improves the range of the missile and makes it very hard to avoid; while most missiles will have lost speed (and thus manoeuvring capability) by the time they reach a long distance target the Meteor is able to hit such a target at it’s maximum speed.

The maximum range of the Meteor is classified, but is known to be (likely significantly) over 200 km. The no-escape zone is publicly stated to be 60 km (for comparison the NEZ of AMRAAM is believed to be 15 km).

Tech specs

  • Length: 3.67 m
  • Finspan: Unknown
  • Diameter: 78 cm
  • Weight: 190 kg
  • Speed: Over Mach 4
  • Propulsion: Throttleable solid fuel ramjet
  • Guidance duration: Unknown
  • Warhead: Blast fragmentation warhead
  • Active radar seeker: Details unknown
  • Manoeuvring capability: Unknown
  • Maximum launch range: In excess of 200 km (likely significantly so)
  • No Escape Zone: 60 km

Used by

  • Typhoon FGR.4
  • F-35B
  • Tornado F.3 (trials only)

Pictures

Click me Meteor missile render:

A Tornado F.3 testing the Meteor missile:

A Typhoon FGR.4 carrying Meteor missiles:

Sources


Air-to-ground missiles

AGM-12B Bullpup

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Summary

The AGM-12 Bullpup was an American air-to-ground missile; it was manually guided by the pilot using a joystick in the cockpit. The Fleet Air Arm used the AGM-12B version on several aircraft.

Tech specs

  • Length: 3.2 m
  • Finspan: 94 cm
  • Diameter: 30 cm
  • Weight: 263 kg
  • Speed: Mach 1.8
  • Propulsion: Thiokol LR58-RM-4 liquid-fuel rocket motor
    • 12,000 lbf thrust
  • Warhead: 113 kg blast-fragmentation warhead with 46.72 kg of explosive

Used by

  • Scimitar F.1
  • Buccaneer S.2
  • Sea Vixen FAW.1
  • Sea Vixen FAW.2

Pictures

Click me A Scimitar F.1 with a Bullpup missile:

A Buccaneer S.2 with a pair of Bullpup missiles:

Sources

Martel AR / TV

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Summary

The Martel (Missile, Anti-Radar and Television) was an Anglo-French air-to-ground missile, which as the name suggests came in both Anti-Radiation (AR) and Television (TV) guided versions. The AR missile was designated AS.37, and the TV missile AJ 168, however in RAF service they were typically just referred to as Martel AR and Martel TV. The AR missile locked onto enemy radars, while the TV missile transmitted a video feed from the missile back to the aircraft, allowing a crew member to manually fly the missile to the target (this required the aircraft to carry a datalink pod).

The AR missile was locked onto an enemy radar before launch (the seeker could detect targets up to 200 nautical miles away at altitude, or 30 nautical miles at see level). The missile was typically fired from an altitude of 200 ft at a range of 17 nautical miles (although could be fired at altitudes up to 36,000 ft). If fired under these conditions the missile would climb to about 15,500 ft then entered a steep dive as it approached the target. The warhead would be detonated either on impact or by a proximity fuse.

The TV version could be fired at an altitude from 100 - 2,000 ft. Once fired the launching aircraft would turn away from the target, while the missile climbed to it’s cruising altitude of 2,000 ft (at a cruising speed of about 480 kts). The missile then established a datalink with the aircraft and the operator was presented with a TV video feed from the missile. The operator had limited control over the missile during the mid-course phase, being able to shift its course left or right, as well as adjust its altitude in increments. The operator could pan the missile camera around to identify the target, once the target was sighted the operator switched the missile into terminal mode giving them full manual control over the missile, allowing them to guide it to the target. In order to guide the missile in the terminal phase the operator just had to keep a crosshair positioned over the target, the missile’s autopilot would fly the missile such that it hit wherever the crosshair was pointed.

Tech specs

  • Length:
    • AR missile: 4.14 m
    • TV missile: 3.9 m
  • Finspan: 120 cm
  • Diameter: 40 cm
  • Weight:
    • AR missile: 535 kg
    • TV missile: 574 kg
  • Speed: High subsonic (TV version apparently cruised somewhere around 480 kts)
  • Propulsion: Separate boost and sustain rocket motors
    • Boost motors burns for 2.5 seconds
    • Sustain motor burns for 92 seconds
  • Warhead:
    • AR missile: High explosive blast warhead containing 119 kg (262 lb) of RDX/TNT (55/45)
      • Impact and proximity fuse
    • TV missile: 109 kg (240 lb) Semi-armour piercing high explosive with 45.36 kg (100 lb) of RDX/Polyurethane
      • Impact fuse
  • AR Seeker:
    • Maximum range: 200 nm at altitude / 30 nm at sea level
    • Coverage (different seeker heads):
      • Band 1: E, F Band (2.7 - 3.7 GHz)
      • Band 2: C, D Band (0.8 - 1.3 GHz)
      • Band 3: I Band (8.4 - 10.0 GHz)
  • Maximum launch range: 17 nautical miles (31.5 km) at sea level. Some reports indicate up to 32 nautical miles (60 km) when fired from altitude (AR version only).

Used by

  • Buccaneer S.2B / S.2D (AR & TV)
  • Nimrod MR.1 / MR.2 (AR & TV)
  • Vulcan B.2 (AR)
  • Sea Vixen FAW.1 XJ476 (AR & TV - trials only)
  • Victor B.2 (AR - trials only)
  • Harrier GR.1 (AR - trials only)
  • TSR.2 (AR & TV - planned)
  • Tornado GR.1 (AR & TV - listed in flight manual, unclear if it ever actually used them though)

Pictures

Click me Martel AR missile:

Martel TV missile:

A Buccaneer S.2B with one Martel AR missile, two Martel TV missiles, and a datalink pod.

Sources

  • Tactical Employment of the Martel Missile - CTTO Report
  • AP101B-1202-15C Buccaneer S.2B Aircrew Manual - Weapon System (Avionic Update)
  • AP3456H Royal Air Force Manual of Flying - Volume H: Aircraft Weapons Employment
  • Buccaneer Boys by Graham Pitchfork
  • Adventures of a Cold War Fast-Jet Navigator: The Buccaneer Years by David Herriot
  • The World’s Missile Systems - 7th edition by Pomona Division of General Dynamics Corporation

AGM-65 Maverick

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Summary

During the 1999 Kosovo War the RAF identified an Urgent Operational Requirement to integrate the American AGM-65 Maverick into the Harrier GR.7. A purchase of the AGM-65G-2 version of the Maverick was announced on 24 July 2000 and the missile officially entered service on 15 February 2001.

Tech specs

  • Length: 2.48 m
  • Finspan: 72.4 cm
  • Diameter: 30.5 cm
  • Weight: 308 kg
  • Speed: 1,000 ft/s (305 m/s) average
  • Propulsion: Boost-sustain rocket motor
    • 10,000 lbf for 0.5 seconds
    • 2,000 lbf for 3.5 seconds
  • Warhead: 136 kg (300 lb) Semi-armour piercing high explosive with 36.2 kg (80 lb) of PBX-108
  • Imagine Infrared Seeker

Used by

  • Harrier GR.7 / 7A / 9 / 9A

Pictures

Click me A Harrier GR.7 carrying an AGM-65G-2 Maverick missile:

Sources

Brimstone

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Summary

The Brimstone is a British ground attack missile which can be launched from aircraft, helicopters, or surface vehicles. Although heavily resembling the AGM-114 Hellfire missile upon which it is based the Brimstone is a completely separate weapon with major differences in design and performance. Brimstone features a millimetre wave active radar seeker (later versions also feature a semi-active laser seeker) and has improved range over the Hellfire.

The original Brimstone missile entered service in 2005, and while successful operations in Afghanistan and Iraq demonstrated the need for improvement. Specifically to satisfy the rules of engagement the RAF needed a weapon with a form of “man the loop” guidance. This resulted in the development of Dual Mode Seeker (DMS) Brimstone (or simply Dual Mode Brimstone), which featured a semi-active laser seeker in addition to the millimetre wave seeker.

Following DMS Brimstone came the Brimstone 2; it featured various improvements, the most significant of which was a new rocket motor which significantly increased the range of the missile. The latest version of Brimstone is the Brimstone 3, which again features various improvements including an enhanced warhead and a >20% range increase compared to Brimstone 2.

Tech specs

  • Length: 21.8 m
  • Finspan: Unknown
  • Diameter: 18.0 cm
  • Weight: 50 kg
  • Speed: Supersonic
  • Propulsion: Solid fuel rocket motor (significantly improved in Brimstone 2)
  • Warhead: 6.3 kg Tandem shaped charge warhead
  • Seeker:
    • Brimstone: Millimetre wave active radar seeker
    • Dual Mode Brimstone, Brimstone 2, Brimstone 3: Dual mode millimetre wave & semi-active laser seeker

Used by

  • Harrier GR.9 / 9A (Brimstone)
  • Tornado GR.1 (Brimstone - trials only)
  • Tornado GR.4 (Brimstone, Dual Mode Brimstone, Brimstone 2)
  • Typhoon FGR.4 (Brimstone, Dual Mode Brimstone, Brimstone 2)

Pictures

Click me A Harrier GR.9 carrying 18 Brimstone missiles:

A Tornado GR.4 carrying 18 Brimstone missiles:

Sources

AGM-45 Shrike

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Summary

The AGM-45 Shrike is an American anti-radiation missile. Being the first ARM deployed by the US it had very limited performance, with early versions requiring different seekers to be fitted before launch depending on the type of radar being engaged. Despite it’s limited performance the RAF decided to use a small number of AGM-45A Shrike missiles during the Falklands War, due to it being believed to have better reliability than the Martel.

Tech specs (AGM-45A)

  • Length: 3.05 m
  • Finspan: 91.4 cm
  • Diameter: 20.3 cm
  • Weight: 177 kg (390 lb)
  • Speed: Mach 1.75 above launch speed
  • Propulsion: Mk 39 or Mk 53 Solid rocket motor
    • 2.8 second burn time
  • Warhead: Blast fragmentation
  • AR Seeker:
    • AGM-45A/B-1: E, F Band
    • AGM-45A/B-2: G Band
    • AGM-45A/B-3: E, F Band
    • AGM-45A/B-4:G Band
    • AGM-45A/B-6: I Band (7.9 - 9.6 GHz)
    • AGM-45A/B-7: E, F Band
    • AGM-45A/B-9: I Band
    • AGM-45A/B-10: E, F, G, H, I
  • Maximum launch range: 12 - 16 km

Used by

  • Vulcan B.2
  • Harrier GR.3 (one modified to carry Shrikes in the Falklands war)

Pictures

Click me AGM-45 missile diagram:

An AGM-45 shrike mounted on a Harrier GR.3:

A Vulcan B.2 carrying AGM-45 missiles:

Sources

ALARM

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Summary

The ALARM (Air Launched Anti-Radiation Missile) is a British anti-radiation missile. The most unique feature of the ALARM is the two stage parachute integrated into the tail of the missile. If the target radar shuts down then the ALARM could deploy it’s parachute and “loiter” in the air for up to two minutes. Once the target began emitting again the ALARM could jettison it’s parachute, and strike the target, even if the target had moved from it’s original location. This made the ALARM very effective at striking mobile anti-aircraft systems.

What happens after ALARM is launched depends on what mode the missile is in. The first three modes require the target location to be known before launch, while the last two do not. However even in first three modes the target’s only needs to be known within 1 nautical mile radius (meaning in War Thunder you would just need to know which side of the map the enemy SPAA is located in).

  • Dual mode: The missile enters a steep climb after launch and attempts to acquire the target. If the target is found it attacks immediately otherwise it will loiter.
  • Loiter mode: The missile enters a steep climb after launch and loiters above the target location, only once loitering does it begin it’s search for the target.
  • Direct Mode: The missile flies a path optimised for maximum ground speed. It will look for a target near the specified location and if one is not found strike the specified location.
  • Corridor Suppression Mode: The missile climbs to altitude and follows a pre-determined flight path scanning for any radars which match it’s list of targets. If such a radar is found it attacks the target.
  • Universal Mode: Same as Corridor Suppression Mode, but optimised for high altitude launch, giving greater range.

The Corridor Suppression and universal modes can attack targets within a 20 nautical mile by 46 nautical mile area in front of the aircraft.

Tech specs

  • Length: 4.3 m
  • Finspan: 72 cm
  • Diameter: 22.4 cm
  • Weight: 260 kg
  • Speed: Supersonic
  • Propulsion: Boost-sustain rocket motor
    • Boost motor burns for 0.7 seconds
    • Sustain motor burns for 52 seconds
  • Warhead: Blast fragmentation
  • AR Seeker: Covers 2.0 - 18.0 GHz (NATO Bands E, F, G, H , I, J)
  • Maximum launch range: 50 nautical miles (93 km)

Used by

  • Tornado GR.1 / 4
  • Tornado F.3 (A small number modified to do so, nicknamed “EF.3”)
  • Harrier GR.7 (trials only)
  • Jaguar (trials only)
  • Eurofighter Development Aircraft (trials only)
  • Nimrod MRA.4 (planned)

Pictures

Click me ALARM missile diagram:

An ALARM missile being carried by a Tornado GR.4:

A Harrier GR.7 carrying two ALARM missiles:

A Eurofighter Development Aircraft carrying two ALARM missiles (among other weapons):

Sources

Sea Eagle

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Summary

The Sea Eagle is a British sea-skimming anti-ship missile. It was based upon the earlier Martel missile, and externally bears significant resemblance to its predecessor (though internally they are very different). The Sea Eagle more than doubled the Martel’s range, carried a larger warhead, and most importantly incorporated an active radar seeker making it a fire and forget weapon (unlike the Martel which had to be manually guided to it’s target).

Prior to launch the Sea Eagle was fed target information by the aircraft’s navigation / attack system. Once fired the Sea Eagle then uses it’s build in Inertial Navigation System to fly towards the target’s location. It can either descend to sea skimming altitude immediately or fly up to 30 km away from the target before dropping to sea skimming altitude and turning in to attack (in an effort to deceive the target’s defences). Once the Sea Eagle is 18 km from the target’s predicted location it activates it’s active radar seeker to lock onto the target for terminal guidance. The Sea Eagle was designed to sink or disable all types of naval vessels, from light attack craft up to heavy cruisers and aircraft carriers.

Tech specs

  • Length: 4.196 m
  • Finspan: 119.6 cm
  • Diameter: 40 cm
  • Weight: 588 kg
  • Speed: Mach 0.85 cruising speed
    • Mach 0.4 - 0.9 launch speed (rocket boosters can be fitted to allow low speed launch)
  • Propulsion: Microturbo TRl 60 model 067 turbojet engine
    • 727 lbf (324 kgf) thrust
  • Warhead: 242 kg (534 lb) Semi-armour piercing high explosive with 100 kg (220 lb) of RDX/TNT
  • Seeker: MSDS 3 cm band active radar seeker with microprocessors
    • Activation range: 18 km
    • Mid-course inertial guidance
  • Maximum launch range: 60 nautical miles (110 km)

Used by

  • Buccaneer S.2B
  • Sea Harrier FRS.1
  • Sea Harrier FA.2
  • Tornado GR.1B
  • Hawk T.1A (trials only)

Pictures

Click me Sea Eagle missile diagram:

A Buccaneer S.2 carrying four Sea Eagle missiles:

A Tornado GR.1B carrying four Sea Eagle missiles:

A Sea Harrier FRS.1 carrying two Sea Eagle missiles:

Sources

  • AP101B-1202-15C Buccaneer S.2B Aircrew Manual - Weapon System (Avionic Update)
  • AP3456H Royal Air Force Manual of Flying - Volume H: Aircraft Weapons Employment

AGM-84 Harpoon

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Summary

The AGM-84 Harpoon is an American anti-ship missile. The RAF purchased the AGM-84A version to equip its Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft during the 1982 Falklands War. The missile can either impact the side of a ship or perform a last minute “pop-up” manoeuvrer to impact the ship from above.

Tech specs (AGM-84A)

  • Length: 3.84 m
  • Finspan: 91.4 cm
  • Diameter: 34.3 cm
  • Weight: 522 kg
  • Speed: Mach 0.85 cruising speed
    • Mach 0.3 - 0.9 launch speed
  • Propulsion: Teledyne J402-CA-400 turbojet engine
    • 660 lbf (299 kgf) thrust
    • 113 lb (51 kg) of JP-4 fuel
  • Warhead: 231 kg (534 lb) Semi-armour piercing high explosive with 97.5 kg (215 lb) of Destex
  • Seeker: Texas Instruments PR-53/DSQ-28 active radar seeker
    • 45° gimbal limits
    • Mid-course inertial guidance
  • Manoeuvring capability: 4g
  • Maximum launch range: 62-66 nautical miles (115-122 km)

Used by

  • Nimrod MR.2

Pictures

Click me AGM-84A Harpoon missile diagram:

A Harpoon training missile the bomb bay of a Nimrod MR.2:

A collection of weapons used by the Nimrod MR.2 (Harpoon is in the centre):

Sources

  • AP3456H Royal Air Force Manual of Flying - Volume H: Aircraft Weapons Employment
  • NAVAIR 01-110AGM-1 AGM-84A SAC

Bombs

500 lb MC bomb

To do

540 lb MC bomb

To do

1,000 lb MC bomb

To do

Paveway Laser Guided Bomb

To do

BL755 cluster bomb

To do

CBU-87 cluster bomb

To do

100 gal napalm tank

To do


Rockets

RP-3

To do

2" RP (RN)

To do

SNEB

To do

CRV-7

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Summary

The CRV7 (Canadian Rocket Vehicle 7) is a Canadian 2.75" rocket developed as an improved version of the American Hydra 70 rocket. It offers a significant improvement over the Hydra in just about every aspect.

The CRV7 comes in two versions which are equipped with different rocket motors each having significantly different thrust curves. The C15 motor is designed for fixed wing applications, it produces less thrust than the C17 motor but burns for much longer. The C17 motor is specially designed to be fired from helicopters and ground launchers, it produces significantly more thrust than the C15 motor but also burns for much less time (0.93 seconds compared to 1.72 seconds for the C15). See the pictures section for the thrust graph of each motor type. Both versions of the CRV7 have access to the same selection of warheads.

Tech specs

  • Length (excluding warhead): 1.04 m
  • Finspan: 17.8 cm
  • Diameter: 7.6 cm
  • Weight (excluding warhead): 6.35 kg
  • Speed: Roughly 1,000 m/s above launch speed for both motors (see picture section)
  • Propulsion: C15 or C17 solid rocket motor (see picture sections for performance)
  • Warhead:
    • WTU-5001/B Practice
    • WTU-5001A/B Hardened Rod Practice
    • WDU-5002/B Flechette Anti-Tank
    • General Purpose Flechette
    • RA-79 High Explosive Incendiary Semi-Armour Piercing
    • M151 High Explosive Point Detonating
    • M156 Smoke
    • M257 / M287 Illumination
  • Maximum launch range: 5.6 km (3.6 km advised in Harrier manual)

Used by

  • Harrier GR.3 (trials)
  • Harrier GR.7 / 7A / 9 / 9A
  • Jaguar GR.1 / 1A / 1B / 3 / 3A

Pictures

Click me CRV7 rockets with practice warheads:

C17 motor thrust and speed:

C15 motor thrust and speed:

CRV-7 rocket pod on a Harrier GR.9:

Sources


Targeting Pods

Pavespike

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Summary

The AN/AVQ-23E Pavespike is an American laser designator pod. It was the first laser designator pod used by the RAF. The Pavespike was an early targeting pod and lacked features such as night vision and target tracking.

Tech specs

  • Length: 3.658 m
  • Diameter: 25.4 cm
  • Weight: 191.415 kg
  • Features:
    • TV imagery: Yes
    • Thermal imagery: No
    • Automatic target tracking: No
  • Field of Regard:
    • Elevation: +15° / - 160°
    • Roll: +160° / -110°
  • Resolution (TV): 525 line video (480i is the digital equivalent)
  • Field of View:
    • Wide: Unknown
    • Narrow: Unknown

Used by

  • Buccaneer S.2B

Pictures

Click me Pavespike pod diagram:

A Buccaneer S.2B carrying a Pavespike pod on the left inboard pylon:

A Buccaneer S.2B carrying a Pavespike pod on the left inboard pylon:

Sources

  • AP101B-1202-15C Buccaneer S.2B Aircrew Manual - Weapon System (Avionic Update)

TIALD

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Summary

The Thermal Imaging and Airborne Laser Designator (TIALD pod) was a British target pod developed to replace the Pavespike. As the names suggests a major improvement over the pavespike was a thermal imaging camera allowing for target detection at night; the pod also featured automatic target tracking.

Two pre-production (‘A’ model) TIALD pods were rushed into service with the RAF during the 1990-91 Gulf War. From the start of the “TIALD Accelerated Programme” it took only 50 days to get the prototype pods ready for combat, re-write the Tornado aircraft’s OFP software, integrate the TIALD pod into the aircraft, complete trials, and ship the pods to the Gulf. Over the course of 18 days the two TIALD pods completed 95 sorties delivering 229 laser guided bombs with an accuracy of 100%. The pods were in almost constant use, being disconnected from one aircraft after landing and immediately fitted to another aircraft about to take off. Only a single fault occurred with one of the pods (which was fixed within a matter of hours) giving them an availability of over 99%.

Following the A model TIALD pod there were three main production versions. TIALD 200 was the initial version, this was followed by TIALD 400 which added a TV camera in addition to the thermal imaging one. The final version was the TIALD 500 which replaced the old SPRITE thermal sensor with a new focal plane staring array sensor, providing a better thermal image. The FoV of the IR and TV modes were also standardised, and various improvements were made to the pod’s avionics to provide better accuracy.

Tech specs

  • Length: 2.9 m
  • Diameter: 30.5 cm
  • Weight: 210 kg
  • Features:
    • TV imagery: Yes
    • Thermal imagery: Yes
    • Automatic target tracking: Yes
  • Field of Regard:
    • Elevation: +30° / - 150°
    • Roll: 360° continuous
  • Resolution (Thermal):
    • TIALD A, 200, 400: SPRITE sensor (higher resolution than TIALD 500 sensor)
  • TIALD 500: 384 x 288 Focal Plane Staring Array sensor (more sensitive than SPRITE sensor)
  • Resolution (TV): 625 line video (576i is the digital equivalent)
  • Field of View (Thermal):
    • TIALD A, 200, 400:
      • Wide: 10.0° x 6.7°
      • Narrow: 3.6° x 2.4°
    • TIALD 500:
      • Wide: 6.69° x 5.02°
      • Narrow: 1.76° x 1.32°
  • Field of View (TV):
    • TIALD 400 (only one FoV available): 3.2 x 2.4
    • TIALD 500 (same as thermal imager):
      • Wide: 6.69° x 5.02°
      • Narrow: 1.76° x 1.32°
  • Electronic magnification: x2, x4 (applies to all modes)

Used by

  • Buccaneer S.2C - trials only
  • Tornado GR.1 / 4
  • Jaguar GR.1B / 3 / 3A
  • Harrier GR.7 / 7A / 9 / 9A

Pictures

Click me TIALD pod diagram:

TIALD pod diagram:

TIALD pod “Tracy” fitted to a Tornado GR.1:

TIALD pod “Sandra” fitted to a Tornado GR.1:

A TIALD pod fitted to a Harrier:

Sources

  • AP101B-0607-15B Harrier GR.7 & GR.7A Aircrew Manual - Operations
  • TIALD: The Gulf War by GEC Ferranti
  • Electro-Optic Product Design for Manufacture: Where Next? by John R. M. Barr, M. MacDonald, G. Jeffrey, M. Troughton of Leonardo, Airborne and Space Systems
  • Advances in electro-optic systems for targeting by G Thomson of GEC Marconi, Navigation and Electro-Optic Systems Division
  • Design for production of a 1.06/8-12 micron optical system by H.G. Sillitto, A.B. Lessells and S.S. Duncan of Ferranti Defence Systems Ltd.

Litening

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Summary

Litening is a family of targeting pods designed by Rafael Advanced Defense Systems. The RAF purchased the Litening III version to replace the ageing TIALD pod on the Tornado GR.4, and equip the Typhoon FGR.4. The RAF’s Litening III pods were built, maintained, and upgraded in the UK by Ultra Electronics.

The UK has recently adopted the Litening V version for use on the Typhoon FGR.4. This version has much higher resolution cameras and a sideways looking synthetic aperture radar for reconnaissance.

Tech specs (LItening III unless otherwise stated)

  • Length: 2.2 m
  • Diameter: 40.6 cm
  • Weight: 208 kg
  • Features:
    • TV imagery: Yes
    • Thermal imagery: Yes
    • Automatic target tracking: Yes
  • Field of Regard:
    • Elevation: +45° / - 150°
    • Roll: ±380° or ±400° (both values given)
  • Resolution (Thermal):
    • Litening III: 640 x 480
  • Litening V: 1,200 x 1,200
  • Resolution (TV):
    • Litening III: 1,000 x 1,000
    • Litening V: 1,600 x 1,200
  • Field of View (Thermal):
    • Wide: 18.4° x 21.1°
    • Medium: 2.8° x 2.8°
    • Narrow: 0.77° x 0.77°
  • Field of View (TV):
    • Wide: 3.5° x 35° (this seems like a typo)
    • Narrow: 0.7° x 0.7°
    • Super Narrow: 0.25° x 0.25°

Used by

  • Tornado GR.4
  • Typhoon FGR.4

Pictures

Click me A Tornado Gr.4 carrying a Litening III pod on the left forward shoulder pylon:

Sources

Sniper

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Summary

The Sniper is an American targeting pod produced by Lockheed Martin. The RAF purchased the Sniper pod to replace the TIALD pod for the Harrier II fleet.

Tech specs (LItening III unless otherwise stated)

  • Length: 2.52 m
  • Diameter: 30.5 cm
  • Weight: 202 kg
  • Features:
    • TV imagery: Yes
    • Thermal imagery: Yes
    • Automatic target tracking: Yes
  • Field of Regard:
    • Elevation: +5° / - 155°
    • Roll: 360° continuous
  • Resolution (Thermal): 1k (1,024 x 768)
  • Resolution (TV): 1k (1,024 x 768)
  • Field of View (not specified if thermal or TV):
    • Wide: 4°
    • Narrow: 1°

Used by

  • Harrier GR.7 / 7A / 9 / 9A

Pictures

Click me A Harrier II carrying a Sniper pod:

Sources


Revisions

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  • V1 (28/06/2023) - Initial Version (copied from old forum and significantly updated)
  • V2 (28/06/2023) - Minor formatting fixes
  • V3 (12/07/2023) - Added sniper pod resolution thanks to @Fireball_2020
  • V4 (19/07/2023) - Fixed broken image link
  • V5 (17/08/2023) - Added more Bullpup information added Jaguar to ALARM capable aircraft
6 Likes

Reserving the first comment in case it’s needed for future expansion.

1 Like

Has there been any further news regarding SRAAM or Red Top improvments?

And has there been any further discussion regarding the addition of CBUs?

No updates yet.

1 Like

That’s a shame. With how quickly the devs responded to my SRAAM reports, requesting I send them a full copy of the document, I had hoped it might have been fixed quite quickly.

4 Likes

I will ask about it.

You’re very optimistic for thinking they will ever get around to buffing those missiles.

Didn’t they wait a full update cycle to just update the tracking rate of skyflashes?

Less concerned about buffs, and more concerned about fixes. Whilst they seem better recently. They still can do unexpected things

Thanks.

image
Hello! Did RAF ever use Snakeyes?

Cleared for use on Harrier GR5/7/9, Tornado GR1/4 and Jaguar GR1/3. So yes, I do have reports in for them when RET bombs were introduced.

1 Like

Nice! Thank you very much :))

What’s the deal with the starstreak from the Stormer HVM? Is it any different from the Starstreak the British Apache gets? It seems much worse. It’s almost impossible to hit jets within 2-3km. That doesn’t seem right.

We’ve also seen they are effective against Kamov helicopters in real life.

Stormer could also use the new Light weight multirole Missle Martlet apperantly

Would it be a improvement from Starstreak?

If they won’t even model the starstreak correctly then I have no hope of them giving us something supposedly better.

It is a proxy fuze missile, so would be better against aircraft. HVM will always be the go-to heli missile.

2 Likes

Same range but proxy fuse, a bit slower and limited anti armour capabilities so depends on the situation

1 Like

Good news, SRAAM is being looked into based on the reports Flame2512 has submittied and the changes to the missile dynamics and auto pilot that will be needed.

7 Likes