MIM-46 Mauler

MIM-46 Mauler
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Thanks to Miraz05 to suggest this to me.

MIM-46_Mauler
The MIM-46 Mauler was developed in response to the need for a modern, effective anti-aircraft missile system to counter low-flying aircraft threats, particularly high-performance tactical fighters, and short-range ballistic missiles. Its development began in the late 1950s to early 1960s, prompted by the increasing speed and capabilities of jet fighters and the recognition of the limitations of existing anti-aircraft systems, such as the M42 Duster.

The US Army initiated the “Forward Area Air Defense” (FAAD) project in 1959 to address these challenges, leading to the development of the Mauler. The primary goal was to create a system capable of engaging low-flying aircraft effectively, including those flying at very low altitudes where traditional radar-guided systems struggled due to ground clutter.

However, despite its ambitious goals and intentions, the Mauler encountered numerous technical challenges and setbacks during its development, including issues with its guidance system, missile launcher, and overall performance. These challenges ultimately led to the cancellation of the Mauler project in November 1965.

In summary, the MIM-46 Mauler was developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s to address the need for a modern anti-aircraft missile system capable of countering evolving airborne threats, but it was ultimately canceled due to technical difficulties and shortcomings.

Performance:
1x general motors 6V53 6-cylinder diesel engine generating 212 horsepower.
Top speed of 37 Mph (60 kph)

structure:
The vehicle held 3 crew members.
8.8 ft in width.
8.3 ft length.
6.6 ft in height.
Weighs 24,912 lb (12.5 tons, 11,300kg)

Armament:
1x9 Missile launcher.
9x XMIM-46A Surface to air missiles.

The MIM-46 Mauler aimed to incorporate several improvements over existing anti-aircraft systems of its time. Some of these improvements included:

  1. Enhanced Guidance System: The Mauler initially utilized a beam riding guidance system, which was intended to offer advantages over traditional semi-active radar homing (SARH) systems. Beam riding guidance was considered beneficial for engaging low-flying aircraft, as it could potentially reduce susceptibility to radar clutter and confusion from ground objects.
  2. Versatility: The Mauler was designed to engage both low-flying aircraft and short-range ballistic missiles, providing a versatile defense capability against multiple threats.
  3. Transportability: The Mauler was mounted on the M113 armored personnel carrier chassis, which offered mobility and ease of deployment for forward area air defense operations. This allowed the system to be rapidly deployed to frontline units as needed.
  4. Improved Target Engagement: The Mauler aimed to address the shortcomings of earlier anti-aircraft systems by offering faster engagement times and increased accuracy, allowing it to effectively engage high-speed aircraft and maneuvering targets.
  5. Advanced Warhead: The Mauler was equipped with a blast-fragmentation warhead designed to inflict damage on enemy aircraft by detonating near the target and dispersing shrapnel. This type of warhead was intended to penetrate the skin of the aircraft, causing damage to critical components such as fuel tanks, hydraulic lines, and ammunition.

Despite these intended improvements, the Mauler encountered significant technical challenges during its development, ultimately leading to its cancellation. However, the concepts and technologies explored in the Mauler project contributed to the evolution of future anti-aircraft systems and guided missile technologies.

The MIM-46 Mauler was an impressive anti-aircraft missile system designed to provide robust defense against low-flying threats. One of its key features was its impressive range, with the capability to engage targets at distances of up to 5 miles, equivalent to about 8 kilometers. This allowed the Mauler to effectively intercept incoming aircraft and short-range ballistic missiles well before they reached critical areas.

Now, when it comes to ammunition capacity, the Mauler didn’t disappoint either. It was equipped with a launcher system capable of holding up to nine missiles at once. The Mauler’s launcher box mounted on the vehicle, housing those nine powerful missiles ready to be deployed in rapid succession. With such a substantial ammunition load, the Mauler ensured sustained defensive operations, making it a formidable force on the battlefield.

The MIM-46 Mauler was an ambitious anti-aircraft missile system developed by General Dynamics in response to the evolving threats posed by low-flying aircraft and short-range ballistic missiles during the late 1950s and early 1960s. It was part of the US Army’s Forward Area Air Defense (FAAD) project, initiated in 1959 to enhance the military’s capabilities against aerial threats.

Overall the development of the MIM-46 Mauler was driven by the need for a modern, effective air defense system that could counter emerging aerial threats, particularly high-speed jet fighters and low-flying missiles. It featured a launcher system capable of holding up to nine missiles, providing ample firepower for engaging multiple targets. The Mauler employed a beam riding guidance system, which differed from traditional semi-active radar homing (SARH) systems, offering potential advantages in engaging low-flying targets and reducing susceptibility to radar clutter.

Equipped with a blast-fragmentation warhead, the Mauler’s missiles were designed to detonate near the target, dispersing shrapnel to inflict damage on critical components of enemy aircraft. However, development of the MIM-46 Mauler faced significant technical challenges and setbacks, including issues with its guidance system, missile launcher, and overall performance. Problems with guidance instructions being lost immediately after launch, as well as damage to missiles in adjacent containers, were among the issues encountered during testing.

Despite efforts to address these challenges, the complexity and reliability issues of the Mauler’s systems ultimately led to the cancellation of the project in November 1965. The cancellation of the MIM-46 Mauler left a gap in the US Army’s air defense capabilities, prompting the development and deployment of alternative systems such as the MIM-72 Chaparral and the M163 Tracked Vulcan, albeit as temporary solutions. While the Mauler itself did not enter operational service, the concepts and technologies explored in its development contributed to the evolution of future anti-aircraft systems and guided missile technologies.

MIM-46_Mauler_c1963

sources:

https://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/m-46.html

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+1

Absolutely belongs in the game. +1

+1. however, I prefer the Hummer with the Stinger missile, just like Japan’s 81SAM

1 Like

+1

1 Like