CH-136 Kiowa

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History of the OH-58:

In the 1960’s Bell helicopters developed the OH-58. The primary helicopter that was designed was call the D-250 this was created for the United States Light Observation Helicopter program, the design that was initial chosen was actually Hughes OH-6 Cayuse but Bell went back to the drawing board and used the D-250 to redesign it and summited the redesigned helicopter now designated “Model 206A” when the Light Observation Helicopter Program re-opened in 1967. Bell’s entry of Model 206A was selected and Bell won the contract, the Model 206A was then designated OH-58A and given the name Kiowa.
USA currently still uses the OH-6 Cayuse and the OH-58A however each of these helicopters has overgone heavy modification to keep up with current technology.

History:

In 1970 Canada purchased 74 OH-58A helicopters from the United States and received deliverers of the helicopters in 1972-71 once Canada received the helicopters they were designated CH-136 Kiowa. (some sources state it was designated as COH-58A’s before being called CH-136 Kiowa’s but I’m uncertain if that is true or not, since not all sources support that)

The CH-136 was taken into service and used for various functions as reconnaissance, command and liaison or artillery fire direction.

During the time the CH-136 was in Canada’s inventory Canada tested and trailed many different mission kits on the helicopter from spotlights, different ski’s, rocket launchers, and mini-guns.

The squads that flew the CH-136 over the life-span of the helicopter being in service were the No. 338 Squadron, No. 400 Squadron, No. 427 Squadron, No. 444 Squadron, No. 408 Squadron, No. 430 Squadron and No. 422 Squadron.

The CH-136 was used until around 1995 when it was replaced by the CH-146 Griffon.

AETE Project Report 72/38 - Test and evaluation of the Emerson Mini-tat system on the CH-136 helicopter

These test were done to assess the compatibility of the prototype version of the Emerson Miniature Tactical Armament Turret (Mini-Tat) on the CH-136 and to be able to evaluate the Mini-Tat gun and sub-systems.

During the project several design deficiencies were encountered and modifications were done locally by Emerson as project report states that throughout the project the prototype system was modified. Corrections to the deficiencies that were found were incorporated into the Final production design of the system.

The project came about since USA has shown that Light Observation Helicopters require some form of armament to be able to project itself and provide defensive or suppressive fire capabilities.

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AETE Project Report 83/46 - NATO Infra-red countermeasures trail support - CH-135 and CH-136 Certification of M-130 Flare Dispenser

This project was not only but all of NATO to be able to trail and assist sponsor NATO nations in the standardization of aircraft electronic warfare expendables.

This was done to measure the effectiveness of chaff and flares on the CH-135 and CH-136 using the M-130 Chaff/Flare Dispenser.

The project concluded that the M-130 installations on the helicopters were airworthy for use during the NATO IRCM trails.

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AETE Project Report 72/26 - Providing a 2.75 - Inch rocket capability on the CH-136 aircraft

This project was conducted to see if the CH-136 could fill the role of fixed wing aircraft in the one of stand-off target marking that the L-19 current held.
This was possible role was outlines in the revisions of the Operation Concept dated 5 January 1972 Issue 2 of the CH-136 Project Master Implementation Plan.

The launchers that were evaluated were:
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M158 Launcher

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M158A1 Launcher

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3-Tub Launcher found on the L-19E aircraft

An AETE designed launcher
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Theses launchers were all tested using FFAR 2.75 inch rockets.

During this project 2 different sights were evaluated:
Illuminated Sight MK8 Model 8 with adjustable reflect MK 7 Mod 0
XM70E1 Collimated Recticle Image Sight

Specs:

Crew: 2
(specs are OH-58A specs as I cannot find CH-136 specs)
Length: 32 ft 2 in (9.81 m)
Rotor diameter: 35 ft 4 in (10.77 m)
Height: 9 ft 7 in (2.92 m)
Empty weight: 1,553 lb (704 kg)
Max takeoff weight: 2,313 lb (1,049 kg)
Powerplant: 1 × Allison Model 250-C18 (T63-A-700) turboshaft, 317 shp (236 kW) (Possibly replaced with a C-18 engine when in Canadian service but its difficult to find more information on the specs on it)
Fuel capacity: 70 gal (264.9 liters)

Max Speed: 222 km/h

M-130 Flare/Chaff Dispenser
AN/AVR-2 Laser Warning Receivers
AN/APR-39(V)1 RWR
IR suppression Equipment
Lower Wire Cutter

Armament:

Prototype Emerson Mini-Tat system (7.62mm)
Production Emerson Mini-Tat system (7.62mm) (rate of fire 750 or 1500 rounds per minute)
M158 Launcher
M158A1 Launcher
3-Tub Launcher found on the L-19E aircraft
An AETE designed launcher
(C-17 and C-15 rockets using WTU-5001/B and WAU-5001 Tungsten rod warheads)

Sources:

Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment reports

(All Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment reports were requested and provided by the Canadian Department of National Defence Directorate of History and Heritage)

  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment AETE Project Report 72/38 - Test and evaluation of the Emerson Mini-tat system on the CH-136 helicopter (12 December 1973)
  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment AETE Project Report 71/34 - CH-136 Testing (29 October 1974)
  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment AETE Project Report 83/46 - NATO Infra-red countermeasures trail support - CH-135 and CH-136 Certification of M-130 Flare Dispenser (20 June 1985)
  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment AETE Project Report 72/26 - Providing a 2.75 - Inch rocket capability on the CH-136 aircraft (16 August 1974)
  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment AETE Project Report 92/19 - CH-136/TMK/C-17 Rocket motor air firings (14 May 1993)
  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment AETE Project Report 84/23 - Evaluation of an AN/AVR-2 laser warning receiver on a CH-136 (25 March 1985)
  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment AETE Project Report 76/57 - Handling qualities evaluation of the CH-136 helicopter with the production Emerson Mini-tat system installed (9 January 1977)
  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment Letter Project Report - PD 79/44-2 - CH-136 IR Suppressor (9 July 1980)
  • Canadian Forces Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment AETE Project Report 79/44-1 - CH-136 Radar warning receiver system evaluation (29 September 1980)


Websites

If anybody would like more information from any of the aforementioned reports please let me know and I can include more either as an edit or in comments.

If more armament is available, then I would say yes. Otherwise, War Thunder is not the place for this kind of helicopters, since it lacks potent anti-tank armament.
It will become another vehicle avoided by players like AB.205.

Sadly as what I can find that is open to the public knowledge Canada didn’t test any other armament on it.

Canada does not arm their Helicopters the same way that USA and other nations do.