Soko G-2 Galeb: Seagull of the Adriatic

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Soko G-2 Galeb, Yugoslav Air Force, 1965-1999
Part of the Yugoslav Air Tree suggestion

Introduction:

The Soko G-2 Galeb (also known by its official Air Force designation N-60) was Yugoslavia’s first mass-produced jet aircraft, a domestic trainer capable of light attack duties. It entered production in 1965, reliably serving both its country of origin and export customers for decades. Though its air support potential for War Thunder is limited, it remains one of the most iconic Yugoslav aircraft ever made and, in my opinion, deserves to be added.

Specifications:
Crew: 2

Dimensions
Length: 10.34 m
Wingspan: 11.62 m (10.47 m when wingtip tanks aren’t installed)
Height: 3.28 m
Wing area: 19.43 m²

Mass
Empty: 2,617 kg
Max take-off: 4,300 kg (with full strike mission loadout)

Propulsion
Engine: Rolls Royce Viper Mk.22-6 turbojet
Thrust: 11.1 kN

Performance
Maximum speed: 812 km/h at 6,000 m
Maximum speed at sea level: 756 km/h
Climb rate: 22.8 m/s (1,370 m/min)
Range: 1,242 km
Flight ceiling: 12,000 m

Armament
2x 12.7mm M3 Browning machine guns (80 rpg)

2x 100kg bombs on inner hardpoints
2x 127mm HVAR rockets or 4x 57mm VRZ-57 training rockets on outer hardpoints

History:
The G-2 Galeb’s development starts with the Yugoslav Air Force’s requirement, issued in 1957, for a turbojet-powered trainer aircraft. The technical characteristics called for a simple, reliable plane with trapezoidal wings to replace the Lockheed T-33 in training units. The Aeronautical Technical Institute started development in 1957, cooperating with the intended manufacturer, Soko. Soko itself would work with British aerospace manufacturers to produce various components. Rolls-Royce, for example, sponsored the G-2’s development and provided the reliable Viper engine.

Models of the plane were tested in the Institute’s wind tunnels, and the prototype was completed in early 1961. It made its first flight on July 3rd of that year by test pilot Ljubomir Zekavic. The Galeb showed good flight characteristics during testing, with its maximum speed at altitude being 812 km/h while clean, and an upper limit of Mach 0.81 reached in a dive. The prototype was actually designated the G-1 Galeb, with the G-2 being the new designation for production models. The main difference in series production was the presence of 2 instead of 3 rubber tanks in the fuselage, as well as wingtip tanks. The G-2 made its public debut in the Le Bourget Air Show in 1963 to a positive response, and the first Galeb trainers entered service with the Yugoslav Air Force on July 30, 1965.

The G-2 Galeb, despite being a trainer, had a limited armament of two Browning machine guns and some provisions for bombs and rockets. This was to enable future pilots to practice combat training, including gunnery and bombing, but it made it possible to perform ground attack missions. The G-2 took part in the hostilities of the Yugoslav Wars, running strike missions from Serbian airfields. Some were shot down by Croatian MANPADS and others destroyed by NATO forces on the ground.

Soko built 248 Galebs in total, with 132 of them used by the Yugoslav Air Force. The rest were exported to Libya, Zaire and Zambia. Libya, the most prolific user of the export model with over 100 ordered, used the type during the recent civil war, and one G-2 was destroyed during landing by a French Rafale in 2011. One Galeb is still operational with Serbia’s Technical Test Center, but several survive as warbirds. The G-2 airframe was also the base for a single-seat attack derivative, the J-21 Jastreb, and the G-3 Galeb designed for a similar purpose.

Gallery:

Gallery

G2 5

G-2 Galeb

pogled unutra


Magazine excerpt showing G-2s being assembled in Soko, as well as a diagram of its weapons.

G2 7

G2 6
The second prototype of the G-2 Galeb.

G2 4

G2 mitraljezi

Sources:

Sources

Г-2 галеб

Aeronautical Museum-Belgrade :: Treasure of Museum

Soko G-2 Galeb

http://www.airwar.ru/enc/attack/g2.html

SOKO G-2 Galeb: A Yugoslav Jet Trainer and Light Ground-Attack Aircraft

Glasnik RV i PVO magazine [unknown issue]

2 Likes

A must have for a Yugoslav tech tree!
+1

3 Likes

I love light attack aircraft! +1 for Yugo!

1 Like