Does the Abrams have a spall liner? No from what I could find

I mean M1E1 had extra steel welded to the hull to simulate increased hull weight. Afaik M1A1 uses the same hull armor as the M1. So for Gaijin its probably not good enough evidence

2 Likes

…which does not state that it is not an official document. It says the findings in the report aren’t an official position. You claimed it said that it wasn’t an official document. That is not what it says at all.

LOL! The cope and denial here! XD

It’s ballistic glass. That spall lining in between to hard and spalling layers stops it from shattering. Glass is well known for fragmenting into many dangerous pieces…unless it has a spall liner BETWEEN the hard layers. Keep up.

7 Likes

What? Go to GPHC discord server vehicle discussions if you want to talk to other people, there are people dedicated to researching tanks there, like the Tankograd people and those focusing on western tanks because I think you need some help.

Like we went from tanks which use metal to glass??? What does glass have to do with this, unless youre talking about fibreglass which goes back to what I originally said.

2 Likes

What do you think spalling is? Please define it.

already did in my post, unless youre saying spalling isn’t fragments?

2 Likes

This is just blatantly incorrect

And pictures of unfinished hulls is disingenuous

5 Likes

source?

4 Likes

Its the turret. If you can’t tell that, perhaps you shouldn’t be commenting here.

4 Likes

this is why I chill in the british discussion posts lol

3 Likes

Lmfao. Are you serious? Thats all youve got? No shit its the turret

I mean you havent provided anything on why I would be wrong

2 Likes

It was enough.

1 Like

Count Trackula already did, but youre just being a contrarian. Youre insane if you think a fully unfinished tank is somehow a gottem

Brb gonna go find an unfinished T90M and post how it doesnt actually come with spall liners

10 Likes

Whatre you even saying

You seem to have a problem understanding your own definitions then. The fact that you can’t see how anti-spall layers integrated into ballistic glass shows the mechanics can work in a way you refuse to accept says everything it needs to about your delusions.

Notice how a spall layer between two spalling surfaces stops spalling in ballistic glass application? Notice the integral armor study and developments that have spall liners incorporated in the composite armor composition? Yet you insist spall liners must be the final layer (which has been disproven multiple instances and applications here.)

"Anti-spall window film is a protective interlayer component for glass manufacturers ideal for diverse security window and ballistic glass applications. As an anti-intrusion product, anti-spall film properties help prevent fragmentation if a projectile hits a glass barrier. Some typical applications for this film include aerospace glass products, school security windows, and high-security automotive windows.

The interlayer laminate film can provide enhanced protection from injuries or harm from flying glass fragments. It’s a PET-based film that we can provide in several different construction types to match your applications. It can increase response time, fortify weak entry points against intruders, and retain shattered glass fragments longer. Convenient and cost-effective, anti-spall window film is a straightforward, quick solution for window manufacturers to enhance security for facilities, vehicles, and other applications."

You’ve falsely implied that any layers in integral composite armor can only serve for adhesion/delamination purposes. The Army Research Lab study blows that claim out of the water. As does spall lining in ballistic glass applications. Ballistic glass, literally meant to stop incoming projectiles and treated to reduce spalling. In a method you claim is impossible. You can’t be reasoned with.

6 Likes

Took me 6 seconds

“The previous M1 and M1A1 Abrams tanks used composite armor similar to the British Chobham with multiple layers of steel and ceramics at the front of the hull and turret. However armor on the M1A2 featured added layers of depleted uranium mesh. This offered significant protection against all known anti-tank weapons, however overall weight of the tank increased. At the time of its introduction protection of the M1A2 Abrams tank was considered as one of the best in the world. All active service M1A1 tanks have been retrofitted with depleted uranium armor. M1A2 tanks supplied to Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Taiwan have downgraded armor without depleted uranium layers. Ammunition for the main gun is stored in the turret bustle, fitted with blow-out panels. Interior is lined with Kevlar liner for protection against spalling. The M1A2 Abrams can be fitted with explosive reactive armor blocks. Some M1A2 tanks were equipped with missile countermeasure devices, intended to detect and jam guidance of the laser-guided missiles.”

3 Likes

Glass, not metal. Show me a source that replaces the glass with metal. There’s a reason you’re using glass liners and I think I know why.

If you don’t join the GHPC discord and continue there, then I’ll conclude you’re not interested and stop commenting with you because you’re clogging up the whole thread.

2 Likes

You cut and pasted from a car body armorer’s web site and think that is at all applicable to tanks in general and the the M1 in particular?

2 Likes

Its like you didnt even read my post which you didnt, I already mentioned website sources and citations which they lack. This is confirmation bias

4 Likes

I think this is an old enough example to be declassified. British Ironclads using wood backing on armor plate to:

  1. Keep it together
  2. Reduce iron spall into the ship

If that was the claim you were reffering to

Source being whatever material Drachinifel recently used for a recent ship armor vid i guess.

2 Likes