QuarterNinjaCM

International Aircraft Tree - Let's Build It

Hey guys, added Canada.

 

I will add more and fix Dutch tree soon, also I will add Romanians soon!

 

Would be great if you guys that helped and are willing to help in the future, to add me on skype so I could make a group so we can discuss.

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I have the competitor of the LACAB GR.8: the Stampe & Vertongen SV.10:

http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/Gal10/9801-9900/gal9810-SV-10-Gootzen/00.shtm

http://www.aviastar.org/air/belgium/stampe_sv-10.php (historical picture)

http://wp.scn.ru/en/ww3/v/1954/66/0/1

http://users.telenet.be/sv-4b/Engels/types.htm (on this page, we see the specifications of the plane)

Edit of my list

http://www.airwar.ru/image/idop/aww2/sv10/sv10-2.gif (plan of the plane)

http://www.airwar.ru/enc/aww2/sv10.html (specifications in russian language)

Edited by Aurel14310
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A few moe planes, from Switzerland:

 

EKW C-35

[spoiler]800px-EKW_C-35.jpg[/spoiler]

 

EKW C-36

[spoiler]800px-Swiss_Air_Force_C-3603-1.jpg[/spoiler]

 

The rest are prototypes, but decided to include them:

 

DoFlug D-3802

[spoiler]Doflug-D3802.jpg[/spoiler]

 

DoFlug D-3803

[spoiler]DoFlug-D-3803.jpg[/spoiler]

 

F+W N-20.10 Aiguillon

[spoiler]F-+-W-N-20.10-Aiguillon.jpg[/spoiler]

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There is other fighter for Polish tech tree, which I forgot, and which may be a reserve planes:

 

PWS-10 - first mass produced Polish fighter it's a plane from early 1930's, however it was mediocrate plane replaced quickly by PZL P.7. @0 of them were sold to Spain, to Nationalists, which used them as a trainers.

 

PWS10.jpg

 

 

Also, I would like to add a Lithuanian planes, it looks that now we are just completing a list of planes, so details will come later.

 

220px-Lithuania_roundel.svg.png

 

 

Reconnaissance aircraft - light bombers

 

ANBO-IVL

ANBO-IVM

ANBO-41

 

Light bomber - attacker - prototype

 

ANBO VIII

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYW8U4ngp_A

Edited by Botan
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That EKW C-36 looks actually quite nice ;)

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New nations with new aircraft, I cant see why not to support it  :salute:

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Ladies and Gentleman,

 

I would like to invite you to our unofficial project (with aim to become official one day) whose aim is to build international plane tree. Many smaller countries or air forces had their own designs in timeline when War Thunder is happening including some very good and unique designs.

 

My colleague BeyondTS, together with me will be in charge for this, with help of our colleagues. We need people who are capable of giving information, finding projects and documentation. Info from WiKi is not sufficient, we need properly researched planes. Also, we need help from artists and guys who are good in graphics stuff to make tree look really pro. At the moment there are few trees and planes from different nations (like Yugoslav tree, or Romanian tree etc). We will try to put them all together and build on them until we have tree filled.

 

Only planes that were designed and produced in these countries will be accepted for now. If we do not have enough we might take planes that were produced by license (like Yugoslav Ikarus Blenheim) etc.

 

If you think you are capable of giving input and help, feel free to contact me or BeyondTS. Feel free to post information you have here in thread but I want to warn everyone that thread will be heavily moderated and only useful info will be left in. All nonconstructive posts will be removed and posters might be officially warned.

 

Thank you in advance for all help,

QN

 

Cool idea, what about setting up a poll, so it's more evident?

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RAAF aircraft of World War Two       29blzlx.gif 
1939 - 1945

 

This is a list of the aircraft used by the Royal Australian Air Force in WW2. The numbers shown relate only to what actually flew with the RAAF. As with the Lancaster where thousands of young Australians flew them in Europe in the RAF, only two were owned by the RAAF.

 

http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-air-support/ww2-allied/aircraft-raaf.htm

 

Boomerang Fighter and Ground Support aircraft

 

308fw4y.jpg

 

When Japan entered World War II in December 1941, the RAAF did not possess a single fighter aircraft for home defence and, consequently, a decision was hurriedly made to produce a local fighter as a stop-gap measure to meet the threatened Japanese onslaught. Fortunately, the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation already had plans in hand for an interceptor aircraft, and this promising design was ordered into production on February 2 1942. 

Thus, Australia's first single-seat fighter came from an organisation headed by Lawrence Wackett, who was also responsible for the country's first indigenous fighter, the two-seat Wackett Warrigal Mk II of 1930.

Named the Boomerang, the new fighter was designed as an interceptor with a high rate of climb and good manoeuvrability. To obtain the best performance, the aircraft was fitted with the most powerful engine in Australia - the 1,200 hp Twin Wasp which was in production for the DAP Bristol Beaufort. Airframe construction was accelerated by incorporating many Wirraway components, and production proceeded so well that the first aircraft progressed from drawing board to test flight in less than four months.

Test pilot Ken Frewin flew A46-1 on May 29 1942, and subsequent tests revealed that the Boomerang had a lively performance, good handling qualities, and was an effective gun-platform for its cannons and machine-guns. As production progressed, many improvements and modifications were incorporated, and the various standard versions were grouped under three CAC designations: CA-12, CA-13 and CA-19. In addition, a high performance prototype, the CA-14 was built with a turbo-supercharger. 

This same aircraft was later streamlined and fitted with a square-cut tail assembly and became the CA-14A. Altogether, 250 Boomerangs were built and the various versions included 105 CA-12s, (A46-1/105), 95 CA-13s (A46-106/200), 49 CA-19s (A46-201/249), whilst the sole CA-14/CA-14A was numbered in the prototype range as A46-1001.

The RAAF accepted the first Boomerang, A46-1, on July 15 1942, and the last aircraft, A46-249 was delivered on February 1 1945. Initial pilot conversion was carried out with No 2 Operational Training Unit (OTU) at Mildura, and these pilots formed the first operational units, Nos 83, 84 and 85 Sqns. 

The first enemy contact was made on May 16 1943, when Boomerangs from No 84 Sqn intercepted and drove off three Betty bombers. For many months, the Boomerangs successfully carried out many similar sorties until, eventually, they were replaced by Kittyhawks and Spitfires. 

Relegated to the army co-operation role with Nos 4 and 5 Sqn the Boomerangs Soon™ established a high reputation for effective strikes throughout New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Borneo; particularly so in co-ordinated operations with RNZAF Corsairs.

The operational effectiveness of the Boomerang was due largely to the extensive evaluation program carried out by No 1 APU under Sqn Ldr J.H. Harper. In particular, test flying on the supercharged CA-14A, A46-1001 developed this version into an effective high altitude interceptor. Also, it is interesting to record that a Boomerang at No 1 APU was modified to take two seats; the second position was placed inside the fuselage behind the pilot and was used by an observer to record instrument and performance data.

TECHNICAL DATA:
(CAC CA-12 Boomerang)

DESCRIPTION: Single-seat interceptor and ground attack fighter. Metal and wood construction.

POWER PLANT: One 1,200 hp CAC licence built Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp R1830.

DIMENSIONS: Span, 36 ft; length, 26 ft 9 ins; height, 9 ft. 7 ins.

WEIGHTS: Empty, 5,373 lb; loaded 7,699 lb.

PERFORMANCE: Max speed, 305 mph at 15,000 ft. Initial rate of climb, 2,940 ft/min. Service ceiling 29,000 ft.

ARMAMENT: Two 20 mm Hispano or CAC manufactured cannons. Four 0.303 Browning machine-guns. Bombs could be substituted when the large drop tank was not carried.

 

 

 Wackett (C.A.C. CA-6)  ( Would make a nice gift Aircraft )

 

fwnkm0.jpg

 

CAC's (Commonwealth Aircraft Corp.) first in-house design resulted from a 1938 decision to obtain a low wing monoplane trainer because that was the configuration most future RAAF aircraft would have. CAC was awarded a contract to build two CA-2 prototypes in October 1938, powered by 130hp DH Gipsy major engines. The first aircraft made its maiden flight in October 1939, and the second was handed over to the RAAF in March 1940. Both aircraft were later re-engined with the 200 hp Gipsy Six.

Production aircraft were designated CA-6 and due to unavailability of Gypsy engines were fitted with 175 hp Warner Scarab radials. This was tested in one of the prototypes during 1940 and found to be satisfactory. CA-6 deliveries began in March 1941 and were completed by April 1942. Serial numbers were A3-1 to A3-200. The two CA-2 prototypes were re-serialed A3-1001 and 1002 to avoid duplication.

TECHNICAL DATA
(CAC CA-2 and CA-6 Wackett)

DESCRIPTION: Two seat intermediate trainer

IN SERVICE: 1941 to 1946

POWER PLANT: One 175 hp Warner Scarab radial

WEIGHTS: Empty 1,910 lbs (866 kg), Loaded 2,592 lbs (1,176 kg)

DIMENSIONS: Wingspan 37 ft 0 in (11.28 m), Length 26 ft 0 in (7.92 m), Height 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)

PERFORMANCE: Max Speed 95 kts (177 kmh), Service Ceiling 16,000 ft (4,877 m), Range 369 nm (684 km)

ARMAMENT: None

 

Tiger Moth

 

wsqkjl.jpg

 

RAAF Service

Following first deliveries in 1939, the RAAF operated 861 Tiger Moths in all, 712 of which were locally produced (in addition to others not delivered to the RAAF) by De Havilland Australia at Bankstown, NSW. Several were also delivered to other Commonwealth countries, and to the USAAF in Australia. It became the basic trainer for thousands of Australian pilots.

Following World War 2, hundreds of Tiger Moths became available for private ownership, at asking prices of 300 to 500 pounds Australian, less than a third the price of a new machine. Yet despite sale of several hundred in the immediate post-war years, the last RAAF Tiger Moths flew in January 1957, when the remaining ten were flown from Point Cook to Tocumwal for disposal. 

SPECIFICATIONS
Span: 29 ft. 4 in.
Length: 23 ft. 11 in.
Height: 8 ft. 9.5 in.
Weight: 1,825 lbs. loaded
Armament: None
Engine: de Havilland Gipsy Major 1 of 120 hp.
Crew: Two

PERFORMANCE
Maximum speed: 104 mph/90 knots
Cruising speed: 90 mph/78 knots
Service Ceiling: 14,000 ft.
Range: 300 miles

 

The Avro Anson "Faithful Annie"

 

2m7xms0.jpg

 

The Anson was the RAAF's first retractable undercarriage, low wing monoplane, and served in great numbers (1,028 aircraft) following 1935 orders, when the RAAF set out to modernise its equipment.  It stayed in service until 1955, when the few remaining examples of this faithful machine were terribly outmoded.

It was initially intended for general reconnaissance, and particularly maritime patrol. The majority were GR.1 versions, delivered between 1936 and 1938. It began to be replaced in the maritime role by the Lockheed Hudson from 1940.
Already dated, the Anson moved to its well-remembered role as a multi-engine, observers, gunners and navigators training aircraft within the Empire Air Training Scheme. 66, 67, 71 and 73 Sqns. continued anti-submarine patrols off eastern Australia from 1942.

Most RAAF Ansons ended their operational careers Soon™ after World War 2, the last to retire being Mk. X VM375 (many Ansons retaining RAF serials), which served at Woomera Rocket Range, South Australia, as one of two communications Ansons between November 1947 and October 1955.

A number of Ansons continued to fly in civil roles with the Royal Flying Doctor Service, various regional operators, police, scientific research bodies, and private owners, including former Queensland Premier Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen, who used one for agricultural work. In the 1960s a series of accidents involving aircraft of similar construction to the Anson led to restrictions, and ultimately to withdrawal of Certificates of Airworthiness. The last pure-bred Anson to fly, VH-BEL / W2121, had its certification extended until September 1962 to complete a survey contract in Western Australia.

An Anson Mk.I continued to fly in private ownership. It was a hybrid Mk.I with a metal Mk. XIX wing fitted to circumvent the certification restrictions, and made various air show appearances.
In the 1990s several Ansons were under restoration. One appeared on the Australian civil register in June 2001.

 

 Fairey Battle

 

jkwnrs.jpg

 

The Fairey Battle was shown to be inadequate as a day bomber early in WW2, but entered widespread use as a trainer and target tug with various Commonwealth air forces. Under the Empire Air Training Scheme (EATS), Australia took delivery of 366 of the type between June 1940 and December 1943. The Fairey Battle was withdrawn from RAAF use in 1949.

 

 Lockheed Hudson

 

35na2xv.jpg

 

RAAF Service
The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) ordered an initial batch of 50 Twin Wasp-powered Hudsons in late 1938.

 Hudsons served with the following RAAF squadrons: Nos. 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14,23, 24, 25, and 32 Squadrons. as well as with the No. 1, 3, 4, and 6 Communications Units, No; 1 Operational Training Unit, No. 1 Rescue and Communication Unit, No. 2 Air Ambulance Unit, and the RAAF Survey Flight. 

The last Hudson was phased out of RAAF service in 1949.

 

 

Vultee Vengeance dive bomber

 

28gxhk4.jpg

 

The Vengeance was designed for the RAF, who at the time were impressed with a need for dive-bombers following the early achievements of the German Stuka. The RAAF followed the lead of the RAF, receiving 342 aircraft from 1942, but cancelling the order for a further 58 aircraft in 1944.

This aircraft was built in the USA but served in the combat role with the RAF and Indian Air Force in Burma, with the French air force in North Africa and with the Royal Australian Air Force in the Pacific.

Developed primarily in response to British interest, Vultee developed a two-seat dive bomber in 1940 which was to become known as the Vengeance. The British Purchasing Commission placed an initial order for 200 aircraft from Vultee along with a further 200 aircraft to be built under license by Northrop. Additional orders then followed. Few of these aircraft actually reached Britain however with almost the entire order being diverted to the Far East for use by RAF, RAAF or Indian Air Force squadrons. A number of aircraft were also retained by the USAAF. In RAF service, Vengeance were operationally employed to good effect in the Burma theatre. As the war progressed, the RAF transferred some Vengeance aircraft to the Fleet Air Arm for use as target tugs. Additionally, some aircraft were used by the RAF in smoke-laying operations.

Edited by MaKy

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Well looking at new Era system. We could have even single nation trees. Since there is no need to fill 0-20.. just five eras.

This should make things easier.

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Well looking at new Era system. We could have even single nation trees. Since there is no need to fill 0-20.. just five eras.

This should make things easier.

but you need at least 3 planes per era (except era V) to get to era V so 13 (including the rank V one)

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My previous post got 'lost' due to the forum rollback it seems, I asked if either of you two (BeyondTS/QuarterNinja) would wish to discuss any information regarding the Dutch aircraft in person (via Skype)? 

 

This will allow us to check all the details that might be relevant in my books and all the things which I might not be able to answer I can attempt to look those up in the national archives and/or aviation musea.

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Just an idea to give axis powers a new faction :

 

We could split the yugoslavian planes and make the "ZNDH" (croatian air force). They fought along side the axis form 1941 to 1945 and used some yugoslavian planes too (because before 1940 it was part of the kingdom yugoslavia).

 

Roundel 1941 to 1944        Roundel 1944 to 1945

 

Croatian_roundel.PNG       75px-Croatian_roundel_WW2.svg.png

 

 

 

Rogožarski R-100

[spoiler]

01721.jpg

[/spoiler]

 

 

Ikarus IK-2

[spoiler]

194_2.jpg

[/spoiler]

 

 

Rogožarski PVT  -   armed with .303 etc.

[spoiler]

Rogozarski%20PVT-H.jpg

[/spoiler]

 

Rogožarski R-313

[spoiler]

01731.jpg

[/spoiler]

 

and some more like a few Zmaj (armed versions ).

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Just an idea to give axis powers a new faction :

 

We could split the yugoslavian planes and make the "ZNDH" (croatian air force).

 

What for?

Croatia (and BTW Slovakia) didn't build their own planes during WWII, so I don't see a reason for such split. There is no doubt that mentioned countries deserve skins.

Edited by Botan
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What for?

Croatia (and BTW Slovakia) didn't build their own planes during WWII, so I don't see a reason for such split. There is no doubt that mentioned countries deserve skins.

 

Many of them were build at later croatian territory like the Ikarus factories and after the split in 1940 they continued parts of the production.

 

And i only thought of that split because allies got 8 countries and axis powers just 4 at the moment. So it's a little bit balanced. Axis don't have that much of countrie which fought along side with there own planes.

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Many of them were build at later croatian territory like the Ikarus factories and after the split in 1940 they continued parts of the production.

 

And i only thought of that split because allies got 8 countries and axis powers just 4 at the moment. So it's a little bit balanced. Axis don't have that much of countrie which fought along side with there own planes.

 

Well, if we make two separated Minor Axis and Minor Allies trees, then it would make point.

However this tree here would be both, so one plane with two skins is enough, copying would just make two identical lines in the same tree.

Edited by Botan
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We could also add the Fokker T.IV (early float-plane torpedo bomber) and Fokker C.XIV-W (follow up to the C.XI-W) to the lists.

Edited by Tarskin
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Updated every roundel to be 150x150p. Looks nicer now :)

Added Romania

 

 

@Soric_

 

I don't think that I can add them because they didn't really make those planes... They got them because they were captured by Germany and given to them. But airplane skin would be another option.

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A small thing JRS 79B and B1 where made in Romania only Used by Romania only and desiged for Romania by Italy. So they are a bit more then licensed. They are in fact Romanian aircraft.
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A small thing JRS 79B and B1 where made in Romania only Used by Romania only and desiged for Romania by Italy. So they are a bit more then licensed. They are in fact Romanian aircraft.

 

Same thing with Blenheim and Hurricanes that were made in Yugoslavia, they have to stay there for now.

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Also if you want the licensed aircraft(I will add the links later)
IAR Produced the following licensed aircraft:
IAR Potez 25
IAR Bf109 G6a
IAR P11F
IAR P24E.
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Same thing with Blenheim and Hurricanes that were made in Yugoslavia, they have to stay there for now.


But there is another thing they where designed for and only produced by IAR. Also had difrent engines.
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