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The tech tree poll  

459 members have voted

  1. 1. Which branch of our tree would you like to see most in the game?

    • Hawker fighters
      191
    • Gloster and Supermarine fighters
      201
    • Fleet Air Arm fighters
      157
    • Fleet Air Arm strike aircraft
      122
    • Coastal Command flying boats and patrol aircraft
      120
    • Twin engined / heavy fighters
      131
    • Bomber Command aircraft
      157
    • Premium aircraft
      68
  2. 2. What kind of new aircraft do you think the current British tree needs the most?

    • Low rank prop fighters
      14
    • Mid rank prop fighters
      38
    • Mid-high rank prop fighters
      123
    • Jet fighters
      69
    • Naval fighters
      68
    • Naval strike aircraft
      29
    • Twin engined or heavy fighters
      23
    • Night fighters
      18
    • Bombers
      74
    • Premium aircraft
      3
  3. 3. Which of the following aircraft do you think needs the most work (new FM, DM, 3d model, tiering etc.)?

    • Tempest Mk V
      78
    • Spitfire Vb / Vc
      49
    • Spitfire IX
      15
    • Meteors
      23
    • Beaufighters
      86
    • Mosquito
      46
    • Vampire
      59
    • Wellingtons
      45
    • Lancaster
      38
    • D.520
      10
    • Hellcat I
      10


POLL ADDED, PLEASE CAST YOUR VOTE!

 

Hello fellow pilots,

 

A couple of weeks ago we formed a team to create our perfect version of the British techtree as a suggestion to the game developers.

 

We've added 126 individual aircraft variants to the existing tree (including those already in the release tree) for a grand total of about 170 aircraft. You can see that our work has been quite extensive... Please do note that the tiering of premium aircraft is based on the ranks of those planes which are already in the game or where we would expect them to be put once they're introduced.

 

I'd like to use this opportunity to thank project members anglomanii, LB95, Linx6, tajj, TrIpMo, wafu_vasco and our supporters Bis18marck70, Evaris, Jimko, RAMJB, Smin1080p and WildBlueYonder for all the great things that they've done and helped with during the course of this initiative. It was a pleasure working with you chaps.

 

Here's a graphic version made by LB95 (thank you, thank you, THANK YOU!) [updated 8 November 2013 - added the Supermarine Swift on rank 20] Please make sure to visit his thread and give him a thumbs up. Also, pay attention to the unofficial tech tree thread on Reddit.

 

lmZesn4.png

 

...and the Excel spreadsheet it was based on...

 

le1yaW6.png

 

Hawker branch:

[spoiler]

The Hawker branch

 

Rank 0 – Hawker Fury Mk I and Mk II (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 2 – Hawker Hurricane Mk I (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 2 – Hawker Hurricane Mk IIa (new)

 

Introduced in September 1940. Similar to the existing Hurricane Mk IIb, but without the ability to carry 250 or 500 lbs bombs or wing-mounted drop tanks. Slightly faster than the Mk IIb, but with a weaker armament configuration of 8 x .303 machine guns.

 

Rank 3 – Hawker Hurricane Mk IIb (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 6 – Hawker Hurricane Mk IIc (new)

 

Hurricane Mk IIa with armament changed to 4 x 20mm Hispano Mk II cannons and the ability of carrying 250 or 500 lbs bombs or drop tanks. Began service in the first half of 1941.

 

Rank 7 – Hawker Typhoon Mk Ia (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 7 – Hawker Hurricane Mk IId (new)

 

Hurricane Mk IIb converted to carry 2 x 40mm Rolls-Royce anti tank guns with 12 rpg, with two innermost .303 machine guns retained for aiming purposes. Additional armour plating was installed around the engine and cockpit. The main armament was later changed to 2 x 40mm Vickers S guns with 15 rpg. Introduced in 1941.

 

Rank 8 – Hawker Hurricane Mk IV (new)

 

A further development of the ground-attack Hurribomber concept. The Mk IV was given a new 'universal' wing with the ability to carry bombs, 8 x '60 lbs' RP-3 rockets and two Vickers S guns. The new, tropicalised Merlin engine developed more power at low altitude, thanks to which the performance of the Hurricane remained unchanged despite gaining more weight due to additional armour plating around the engine and radiator.

 

Rank 13 – Hawker Typhoon Mk Ib [late] (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 14 – Hawker Tempest Mk V (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 14 – Hawker Tempest Mk VI (new)

 

Introduced in mid-1945 as a refinement of the Mk V, designed as an interim variant before the Mk II became available in larger numbers. Used a more powerful, tropicalised Napier Sabre V engine with a larger radiator, with the oil cooler and carburettor air intake being moved to wing roots. A very slight improvement on the Mk V in terms of overall performance, should be a very similar aircraft in game.

 

Rank 15 – Hawker Tempest Mk II (new)

 

A Tempest variant powered by the air-cooled, sleeve valve Bristol Centaurus radial engine. A better performer in almost all respects than its brother, the Mk V. Introduced in early 1945 with the first Hawker-built examples leaving the factory gates in October 1944. Never made it into combat, though Tempest II and VI squadrons were to be used in the planned invasion of the Japanese home islands. Some were built as fighter bombers with a strengthened wing designed to carry a larger bomb load in addition to the standard 4 x 20mm Hispano Mk V cannon.

 

Rank 16 – Hawker Sea Fury FB Mk 11 (new)

 

The ultimate development of the Typhoon/Tempest airframe. First produced in 1946, it became one of the greatest (if not the greatest) piston engined aircraft in history. Used during the Korean War (where it replaced Seafire FR 47 squadrons), where it served with distinction as both an air superiority fighter and fighter bomber. Powered by the Bristol Centaurus engine, it could reach 750 km/h. The standard armament was 4 Hispanos, but this was often supplemented by 12 x RP-3 rockets and/or a combination of 500 and 1000 lbs bombs.

 

Rank 18/19 – Hawker Sea Hawk F Mk 1 (new)

 

A straight-wing, subsonic jet based on the Sea Fury airframe, first flew in September 1947. Powered by the Rolls-Royce Nene (the engine which the Soviets copied and used in the MiG-15) it could do 950 km/h in a clean configuration. Unlike its later variants the F Mk 1 couldn't carry any external ordnance, relegating it to a fighter role.[/spoiler]

 

Spitfire branch:

[spoiler]

The Spitfire branch

 

Rank 1 – Gloster Gladiator Mk II (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 4 – Supermarine Spitfire Mk I (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 5 – Supermarine Spitfire Mk IIa (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 6 – Supermarine Spitfire Mk IIb (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 6 – Supermarine Spitfire Mk Va (new)

 

Initially developed as an high altitude interceptor, the Mk V subsequently became the mainstay of the RAF Fighter Command until the introduction of the Mk IX. Similar to the existing Mk Vb, but fitted with the classic 'A' type wing with 8 x .303 machine guns.

 

Rank 8 – Supermarine Spitfire Mk Vb (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 9 – Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk Vb (new)

 

A Mk Vb variant modified for low altitude combat in 1941 to counter the threat of the Fw 190 over the English Channel. Often called 'clipped, clapped and cropped' because of its shorter 'B' type wings ('clipped'), modified supercharger impeller ('cropped') and often bad condition owing to intensive combat use ('clapped').

 

Rank 9 – Supermarine Spitfire Mk Vc (existing, moved)

 

Moved from rank 12 to rank 9 to increase its competitiveness in HB.

 

Rank 10 – Supermarine Spitfire F Mk IXc [early, Merlin 61] (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 11 – Supermarine Spitfire F Mk VII [Merlin 64] (new)

 

A mid- to high altitude variant with a pressurised cockpit, strenghtened airframe (latter carried over to the Mk VIII, which was to become the main fighter variant of the Spit), two-stage supercharged Merlin 64 engine and a standard 'C' type wing (4 x .303 Brownings, 2 x 20mm Mk II Hispanos). Similar in many respects to the rank 10 Mk IXc but with superior performance at medium to high altitudes.

 

Rank 11 – Supermarine Spitfire HF Mk VII [Merlin 71] (new)

 

Point-defense interceptor with a Merlin 71 calibrated for extreme altitudes, designed to counter high-flying bombers and reconnaissance aircraft. Similar to the F Mk VII but with worse performance at low altitudes and superior speed when high in the atmosphere. Extended wingtips give increased lift and a quicker rate of roll at high alts, but are a hindrance elsewhere.

 

Rank 11 – Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk XVIe [Merlin 266, 18 lbs/sq.in.] (existing, modified)

 

Similar to the Mk XVI we currently have in the game, only without the 150 octane fuel upgrade (which doesn't work as it's supposed to, at least in the Mk XVI) and a 'razorback' fuselage. 'E' type wing with 2 x .50 calibre AN/M2 Brownings and 2 x 20mm Mk II Hispanos.

 

Rank 12 – Supermarine Spitfire Mk XII (new)

 

Single-stage supercharged Griffon II or IV powered variant which first went into service in late 1942. Faster at low altitudes than the early F Mk IX, but slower over 6000m. Used a standard 'C' type wing with 4 Brownings and 2 Hispanos, but had clipped wings to enhance maneouvrability at low altitudes.

 

Rank 13 – Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk IXe [Merlin 66, 25 lbs/sq.in.] (existing, modified)

 

Existing LF Mk IXe modified with an 'E' type wing with 2 .50 calibre Browning machine guns in addition to the now standard 20mm Hispanos.

 

Rank 13 – Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk XVIe [Merlin 266, 25 lbs/sq.in.] (new)

 

Similar to the earlier LF Mk XVIe, but with a 150 octane fuel upgrade and a bubble canopy. Differs from the LF Mk IXe with 'clipped' wingtips, which give it a better rate of roll but slightly inferior turn performance and high altitude handling.

 

Rank 14 – Supermarine Spitfire F Mk XIVe [late] (new)

 

The main Griffon powered Spitfire variant. Had spectacular performance at mid- to high altitudes (owing to a two-stage, two speed supercharger) and a rate of climb that exceeded any Spitfire produced before it, especially with the 150 octane fuel upgrade. This is a later production variant, which has an 'E' type wing but retained the 'razorback' fuselage with a standard canopy.

 

Rank 14 – Supermarine Spitfire F Mk XVIIIe (new)

 

Similar to the Mk XIV, but with enlarged fuel capacity and a cut-back rear fuselage adorned with a bubble canopy.

 

Rank 15 – Supermarine Spitfire F Mk 21 (new)

 

A development of the Mk XIV airframe with a new, semi-elliptical wing which was stronger and carrier 4 x 20mm Hispano Mk II cannons with 150 rounds per gun. Came into service in January 1945.

 

Rank 16 – Supermarine Spitfire F Mk 22 (new)

 

Similar to the Mk 21 in most respects but with a cut-back rear fuselage, bubble canopy and a larger Spiteful tail unit. The last production variants had 4 x 20mm Hispano Mk V cannons. Missed the war, but continued in RAF service until 1955.

 

Rank 17 – Supermarine Spiteful F Mk XIV (new)

 

The ultimate development of the Spitfire platform. Production started in 1945 with orders for 150 examples, but with the advent of jet power and the war ending only 17 were ever built (not including prototypes). Initially based on the Spitfire Mk VIII airframe, the Spiteful grew to be a very different aircraft with a broader fuselage and laminar flow wings. It could do 780 km/h at 6000 m and had a rate of climb similar to Griffon powered Spits. In addition to the now standard 4 Mk V Hispano cannons it could carry between 8 to 12 RP-3 rockets and up to 2000 lbs of bombs.

 

Rank 17 – Gloster Meteor F Mk 3 (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 18 – Gloster Meteor F Mk 4 [long wing] (existing, unchanged)

 

Rank 18 – Gloster Meteor F Mk 4 [short wing] (existing, moved)

 

Moved to rank 18 to increase its competitiveness in HB.

 

Rank 19 – Gloster Meteor F Mk 8 (existing, moved)

 

Dropped by one rank like the F Mk 4 SW.

[/spoiler]

 

Coastal Command flying boats (author - Linx6):

[spoiler]

Chaps and girls stand down and let me tell you about what flies and floats the flying boats:

 

 

Rank 2 Saro Lerwick

300px-Saro_Lerwick_takeoff.jpg
 
Introduce in 1940 the Saro Lerwick was a Long Range Maritime Patrol flying boat and anti-submarine aircraft. It was powered by 2 Bristol Hercules II radial Engines developing 1,375 hp (1,026 kW) each.
 
Armed with one x303(7.7mm) Vickers K gun in the bow turret and two x0.303 in(7.7mm) Browning Machine guns in the dorsal turret and 4 in the tail turret. And up to 2,000 lb (900 kg) of bombs or depth charges
 

 

 

Rank 3 Short Sunderland Mk I

742641.jpg

 

Introduced in 1938 the Short Sunderland Mk I was a long range bomber flying boat. Powered by 4 × Bristol Pegasus XVIII nine-cylinder radial engine, 1,065 hp (794 kW) each

Armed with: 2,000 lb (910 kg) of bombs (usually 250 or 500 lb), mines (1,000 lb) and
    7× 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns(turrets)

    4x 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns(nose mounted)

    2x Browning 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) machine gun

 

 

Rank 4 Short Sunderland Mk III

Short_Sunderland_MkIII.jpg

 

Introduced in 1941 the Short Sunderland Mk III was a long range bomber flying boat. Powered by 4 × Bristol Pegasus XVIII nine-cylinder radial engine, 1,065 hp (794 kW) each

Armed with: 2,000 lb (910 kg) of bombs (usually 250 or 500 lb), mines (1,000 lb) and
    16× 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns

     2× Browning 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) machine gun

 

 

Rank 5 Short Sunderland Mk V

250px-Short_Sunderland_Mk_V_ExCC.jpg

 

Introduced in 1945 the Short Sunderland Mk V was a long range bomber flying boat. Powered by 4 × Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp 1,200 hp (895 kW) each

Armed with: 2,000 lb (910 kg) of bombs (usually 250 or 500 lb), mines (1,000 lb) and
    16× 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns

     2× Browning 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) machine gun

 

 

Rank 8 Short Seaford

 7921.jpg

Introduced in 1944 The Short S.45 Seaford was a 1940s flying boat, designed as a long range maritime patrol bomber. Powered by: 4 × Bristol Hercules XIX radial engines, 1,720 hp (1,283 kW) each

 

Armed with:

    Guns: 6 × .50 in Browning machine guns (two each in nose and tail turrets and two beam guns), 2 x 20 mm Hispano cannon in dorsal turret and 2 × fixed .303 in Browning machine gun
    Bombs: 4,960 lb (2,250 kg) of bombs and depth charges

[/spoiler]

 

Heavy/twin engined fighters (author - tajj):

[spoiler]

Tier 0 - Hawker Demon

 

Introduced in March 1935, the Hawker Demon was a fighter variant of the Hawker Hart light bomber and was the last two-seat biplane fighter to be manufactured in significant numbers.

 

Armed with two forward firing Vickers machine guns and one Lewis machine gun in the rear cockpit, the aircraft could be fitted with up to eight 9kg bombs for ground attack

 

http://www.airforce....r180/hawker.htm

 

Tier 1 -  (New) Bristol Blenheim Mk I F

 

The first Blenheims entered service in March 1937, the Mk 1F variant was a modification to the Mk 1 airframe that led to a long-range fighter version. For this role, about 200 Blenheims were fitted with a gun-pack under the fuselage for four .303 in (7.7 mm) Brownings

 

http://www.wwiivehic...ol-blenheim.asp

 

 

Tier 2 - (New) Boulton Paul Defiant Mk I 

 

Entering service in December 1939, this 'Turreted Oddity' (credit to Wg_Cdr_Lowe for that name) was conceived as bomber interceptor aircraft, In theory, turret-armed fighters would approach an enemy bomber from below or from the side and coordinate their fire. The separation of the tasks of flying the aircraft and firing the guns would allow the pilot to concentrate on putting the fighter into the best position while the gunner could engage the enemy. Without forward firing guns though and the additional weight of the turret the Defiant suffered against more agile Me 109s and was largely a failure it its conceived role. It found better success as a night fighter. Armed with 4 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns in hydraulically powered dorsal turret (600 rpg)

 

http://en.wikipedia....on_Paul_Defiant

 

 

Tier 3 - (New) Bristol Blenheim Mk IV F 

 

Another Blenheim night fighter variant. The Mk IVF had the same ventral gun pack that was in the Mk IF (four 7.7 mm machine guns under the fuselage). Introduced in 1939, 125 were converted. Improvements included self sealing fuel tanks, armor was also added and made use of a AI Mk III radar.

 

http://www.wwiivehic...ol-blenheim.asp

 

 

Tier 4 - (New) Westland Whirlwind Mk 1

 

Introduced in June 1940 The Whirlwind was a twin-engined heavy fighter developed by Westland Aricraft. It was the RAF's first single-seat, twin-engined, cannon-armed fighter, and a contemporary of the Spitfire and Hurricane  It was one of the fastest aircraft in service when it was introduced. Armed with 4x Hispano 20 mm cannons with 60 rounds per gun.

 

http://en.wikipedia....lwind_(fighter)

 

http://www.militaryf...aircraft_id=524

 

 

Tier 5 - (new) Westland Whirlwind Mk Ia "the Whirly Bomber".

 

A variant of the Whirlwind with the option to add 2x 250 lb (115 kg) or 500 lb (230 kg) bombs

 

 

Tier 6 - (New) Bristol Beaufighter Mk 1F

 

Introduced in September 1940, the Mk 1F Beaufighter was a twin engined heavy fighter armed with 4 nose mounted Hispano cannons. Powered by two two-speed supercharged Bristol Hurcules radial engines the IF achieved a maximum speed of 323 mph. 

 

http://en.wikipedia....ighter#Variants

 

http://www.aviation-...l/beaufite.html

 

Tier 7 - (existing, moved) Beaufighter Mk VIc.

 

 

Tier 8 -  (New) de Havilland Mosquito F Mk II

 

Entering service in January 1942, this fighter version of the Mosquito was armed with 4 .303 Browning machine guns and 4 20mm Hispano cannons in the nose. It was unable to carry an bombs. With it's twin Merlin 21 engines the Mosquito was capable of a max speed of 366 mph (with the correct paint!) 

 

http://www.historyof...osquito_II.html

 

http://www.wwiiaircr...o/mosquito.html

 

 

Tier 8 (existing, moved) Beaufighter Mk X.

 

http://www.historyof...r_variants.html

 

 

Tier 9 - (existing) Bristol Beaufighter Mk 21 

 

 

Tier 10 (existing, moved) de Haviland Mosquito FB Mk VI/early

 

http://www.historyof...osquito_VI.html

 

 

 

Tier 11 (new) de Havilland Mosquito NF Mk XIII

 

Based on the FB Mk VI, the Mk XVII night fighter version entered service in the autumn of 1943. Powered by the same Merlin 25 engines as the Mk VI it was capable of a top speed of 369 mph.

 

http://www.historyof...quito_XIII.html

 

 

 

Tier 12 - (existing, modified) de Havilland Mosqutio FB Mk VI/Late (access to rockets) 

 

 

 

Tier 14 - (new) de Havilland Mosquito NF Mk 30

 

The NF Mk 30 was the main Mosquito night fighter towards the end of the war. It was powered three different Merlin engines – the Merlin 72 (1,680 hp), Merlin 76 (1,710 hp) or Merlin 113 (1,690 hp) and was capable of 400 mph with two 50 gallon drop tanks.. It was otherwise very similar to the NF Mk XIX. It used the AI Mk X radar set, with the radar antenna in a nose radome. Firepower was provided by four 20mm cannon. The NF Mk 30 entered service with No. 219 Squadron, in June 1944.

 

 

Tier 15 - (New) de Havilland Hornet F1

 

A development of the Mosquito, the Hornet Entered service at the end of the Second World War, the Hornet equipped postwar RAF Fighter Command day fighter units in the UK and was later used successfully as a strike fighter in Malaya.  It was powered by  Two × Rolls-Royce Merlin 130/131 12-cylinder engines, 2,080 hp (1,551 kW) each, meaning the Hornet could reach a top speed of 472 mph. It was armed with 4 Mk V Hispano Cannons. 

 

 

http://en.wikipedia....avilland_Hornet

 

 

Tier 16 - (New) de Havilland Hornet F3

 

http://www.vicflinth...net/hornet.html

 

http://www.classicwa...land-hornet.php

[/spoiler]
 
Naval fighters (author - wafu_vasco):
[spoiler]

0 – Hawker Nimrod I/II (existing, unchanged)

 

1 – Gloster Sea Gladiator Mk.II

 

Adopted by the Fleet Air Arm in December 1938, the Sea Gladiator Mk.II’s main differences from its land based counterpart were the addition of an arrestor hook for carrier operations and an emergency dinghy for the pilot. 60 aircraft were purpose built and a further 38 converted from RAF Gladiators. Sea Gladiators played an instrumental part in the defence of Malta, where six of the fighters were erroneously seen as the famous three Faith, Hope and Charity.

 

2 – Hawker Sea Hurricane Mk.Ib

 

Due to the Sea Hurricane Ib coming from a variety of sources, it is difficult to provide an exact definition of this aircraft. Some were purpose built; others were converted from Hurricane Mk.Is and Mk.IIs, therefore giving a variety of performances due to a number of different variants of the Rolls Royce Merlin engine. A Sea Hurricane Mk.Ib is now generally accepted as any Hurricane fitted with an arrestor hook and armed with 0.303 inch machine guns.

 

2 – Fairey Fulmar Mk.I

 

Entering service with the Fleet Air Arm in summer 1940, the Fulmar was a quantum leap for British carrier fighters but still lacking the essential performance of land based counterparts. Admiralty Specifications still called for a two seat fighter as it was felt that over sea navigation was too complicated for a pilot alone; so whilst the Fulmar carried eight 0.303 inch machine guns and was powered by a Rolls Royce Merlin VIII, the addition of a second cockpit and crew member had a serious effect on performance.

 

3 – Hawker Sea Hurricane Mk.Ic

 

The Sea Hurricane Mk.Ic fitted the wings of a Hurricane IIc to a Hurricane I’s fuselage. This resulted in a fighter powered by a Merlin III engine, fitted with an arrestor hook, catapult spools and a naval radio and armed with four Hispano 20mm cannons. Whilst slower than its machine gun armed counterparts it was still capable of just under 300 mph and highly maneuverable, particularly in the turning plane at low level.

 

3 – Fairey Fulmar Mk.II

 

The Fulmar Mk.II replaced its predecessor’s engine with a Rolls Royce Merlin XXX, giving an increase of over 200 horse power. It was also modified for tropical operations. This gave a welcome increase in performance but it was still lacking when compared to land based fighters. However, testament to the crews which operated them was the fact that the Fulmar is credited with more aerial kills than any other type in the history of the Fleet Air Arm.

 

5 – Hawker Sea Hurricane Mk.IIc

 

Building on the Sea Hurricane Mk.Ic, the Mk.IIc was now fitted with a Merlin XX engine to give it a considerable boost in performance. Employed in a variety of theatres and capable of successfully operating from the small decks of Merchant Aircraft Carriers, over 400 had been converted by early 1944.

 

7 – Supermarine Seafire Ib

 

After successful carrier trials involving a hooked Spitfire V, the Seafire Ib entered service in June 1942. It was essentially a Spitfire V with a number of modifications including an arrestor hook and counterbalance weights, airframe strengthening, naval radio and a number of further modifications. Whilst these weight increases did have an effect on performance the Fleet Air Arm was now equipped with a fighter capable of meeting most land based opponent on even terms.

 

7 – Supermarine Seafire IIc

 

Intended as a purpose built Seafire to augment the modified Ib, the Seafire IIc included the addition of catapult spools, further strengthening, additional armour and further counter balance weights. The adoption of the ‘C’ wing was intended to provide the option for 4 20mm cannons, but as the Seafire IIc was already slower than the Seafire Ib by some 15 mph at all heights, this further increase in weight was never employed. The Seafire IIc entered service alongside the Ib in June 1942.

 

8 – Supermarine Seafire LIIc

 

Given that the majority of naval aviation interceptions were occurring at low to medium level, the decision was made to optimize the Seafire’s performance accordingly. March 1943 saw the beginning of  a program to convert Seafire IIc’s to the new LIIc by fitting the Rolls Royce Merlin 32 which was optimized for low level flight. A larger, four bladed propeller was also fitted. The LIIc’s performance was a huge leap over the IIc and it possessed the best low level rate of climb and acceleration of any naval fighter of the war.

 

9 – Supermarine Seafire FIII

 

An operational shortcoming in previous Seafires was now addressed in the FIII: a folding wing was added for storage below deck. As the folding mechanism was manual, the weight increase was only some 125 lbs. Further modifications included a reduction in drag from the ‘C’ wing’s cannon blister and stub and the fitting of a Merlin 55 engine. The resulting performance was impressive at all altitudes, but still inferior to the LIIc at low level.

 

9 – Supermarine Seafire LIII

 

The ultimate development of the Merlin engine Seafires, the LIII was also produced in the greatest numbers. The LIII replaced the FIII’s Merlin 55 with a Merlin 55M engine, which was optimized for low level performance. Individual exhaust pipe stacks and far greater quality control with airframe panels resulted in a speed increase of up to 20mph. The Seafire LIII’s finest hour came in August 1945 where, in the last aerial combat of World War 2, eight Seafires met fifteen A6M5 Zeros, shooting down eight for the loss of only one.

 

13 – Supermarine Seafire XV

 

The Seafire XV was an amalgamation of components from many sources; the fuselage of a Spitfire MkVb, the wings of a Seafire LIII, the fin and rudder of a Spitfire VIII but, most crucially, the naval variant of the now legendary Rolls Royce Griffon engine; the Griffon VI. A host of further modifications were required for the new engine but when the aircraft entered service in September 1945 it saw another significant step in the evolution of the Seafire.

 

14 – Supermarine Seafire 17

 

Further modifications to the Seafire XV led to the Seafire 17; these included a new, high visibility canopy and a strengthened undercarriage with further modifications to ensure greater propeller clearance in deck landings. Whilst the performance was similar, the Seafire 17 proved to be popular due to improvements in handling and the flexibility offered by the capability to fit bombs, rockets and cameras.

 

15 – Supermarine Seafire 46

 

Often described as a naval version of the Spitfire Mk22, the Seafire 46 was still a separate aircraft in its own right. Now fitted with contra-rotating propellers driven by a Griffon 85, the almost complete elimination of torque effect resulted in an aircraft with wonderful deck take off and landing characteristics. The lack of yaw or gyroscopic effects also meant that weapon firing was more accurate.

 

16 – Supermarine Seafire 47

 

The ultimate version of the Spitfire/Seafire line, the Seafire 47 was far removed from the Spitfire Mk.I it had evolved from. A Spiteful pattern fin and rudder, repositioned ram-air supercharger intake and new Griffon 88 engine were augmented with larger control surfaces and a new petrol injection system. In trials it was compared to the Sea Fury, Sea Hornet and Sea Vampire – the Seafire 47 had the highest dive speed and rate of climb at high altitudes, the greatest roll rate and was only out turned by the Sea Fury. In 1950, Seafire 47s of 800 Naval Air Squadron were amongst the first aircraft to enter action in the Korean War.

 

17 – Supermarine Seafang

 

Intended as a naval counterpart to the Supermarine Spiteful, the Seafang was powered by a Rolls Royce Griffon 61 or 89 engine with contra rotating propellers. Developed in a fixed and folding wing version, only 16 production aircraft were delivered out of the planned run of 150 airframes due to cancellations following the cease of hostilities in 1945. The Seafang was armed with four 20mm cannons and had a maximum speed of 475 mph at 21,000 feet.

 

17 – Gloster Sea Meteor F3 (existing, unchanged)

 

19 – Supermarine Attacker FB1

 

The first jet fighter to be standardized in front line squadrons of the Fleet Air Arm, the Attacker entered service in August 1951. Powered by a Rolls Royce Nene 3, the Attacker was capable of reaching speeds of 590 mph at sea level and was armed with four 20mm cannons and provisions for eight 60 lb rockets or two 1000 lb bombs. It was also fitted with a Martin Baker ejector seat and Rocket Assisted Take Off Gear. By 1954 Sea Hawks began to replace the Attacker in front line squadrons, but it continued in service with the RNVR until 1957.[/spoiler]

 

Anglomanii's premium aircraft descriptions:

[spoiler]

Tucks Gladiator II-see in game

 

Wirraway-see in game

 

Hudson V Bomber

The MkV Hudson carried up to seven .303 browning machine guns with two guns in a dorsal turret position, one in a retractable ventral position, and one in each beam position and two pilot controlled guns in the front above the bombardier’s position. The Hudson V was powered by two twin wasp s3c-g4 1200hp radial engines and could carry up to 1600lbs of bombs often a mix of 100lb or 250lb bombs and sometimes a pair of 500lb bombs in a internal bay.

“The Old Boomerang
The Hudson—nicknamed the “Old Boomerang” due to its ability to withstand enemy fire and safely return home—would go on to earn innumerable accolades during the war. It primarily served with the RAF Coastal Command hunting German and Japanese submarines, but Hudson crews also provided convoy escort, participated in the RAF’s first thousand-aircraft raid into Germany, performed reconnaissance missions, and dropped spies behind enemy lines.”

(thanks to the Lockheed's website)

 

Havoc I-see in game

 

Douglas Boston II DB7B-II

The French ordered 170 DB7B-II aircraft in 1939, but due to the fall of France in June 1940, possibly up to 160 of these aircraft would escape into RAF service. The French Purchasing Commission had been impressed with the performance of the Douglas Model DB7B-I, The Armèe de l’Air however wanted an aircraft which could carry more bombs over a longer ranges. The engineers at Douglas redesigned the fuselage of the Model 7B, modifying it to be narrower and higher. This design change allowed greater fuel and bomb stores to be carried, it did result in a very tight crew environment. The DB7B-II had two 1,100hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S3C4-G radial engines with two speed superchargers, carried six 7.5mm machine guns and then .303in guns in RAF service. The aircraft had four fixed forward firing guns with one flexible dorsal gun and one ventral position with a flexible rear firing gun. The interchangeable nose of the Model DB7B-I was replaced by a partly glazed bombardier’s nose, with room for the forward firing guns mounted in cheek blisters. These Aircraft would serve all over the European theatre, on both sides under Vichy and RAF command and do Stirling work in the north African and Mediterranean campaigns. Most of these aircraft would later find service as DB-7A Havoc I Night Fighter.

 

 

Douglas Boston DB7B-IIIA

the Boston III was powered by two Wright R-2600-23 engines, had more armour and several improved engine and electrical systems. With four fixed 0.303 guns in nose, twin hand operated guns in dorsal and ventral positions and with a fixed rear facing gun in the extreme tail operated by the rear dorsal gunner. The Boston III proved to be a difficult target. Bomb load 12x20lb light fragmentation bombs or 4x250lb bombs, 4x500lb bombs or 1x2000lb torpedo.

A couple of the Bostons operated by the RAAF also had a fixed 0.30-inch machine gun in the extreme tail. This gun was operated electrically by the rear-gunner. RAAF Bostons took part in the Battle of Bismark Sea and contributed in attacks on a large Japanese convoy headed towards Lae in Papua New Guinea. The Bostons served with No 22 Squadron where their operations became known as "Boston Tea Parties" and individual aircraft became legendary. Wing Commander Learmonth's "She's Apples" set a South-West Pacific bombing record; Flight Lieutenant Williamson's A28-5 was belly-landed with a bomb load and was back in operations within hours; and, most famous of all, Flight Lieutenant Bill Newton's A28-3 crashed off Salamaua on 18 March 1943, prior to his posthumous Victoria Cross award.

Buffalo I

The Brewster Model 339E supplied to the Commonwealth proved to be somewhat of a failure in Europe and hence would only see service in Far East commands. Based on the USN F2A-2 it was less powerful than it's predecessor being provided with a export engine the 1,100 hp Cyclone 1890-G105 compared to 1,200 hp R-1820-40 in the F2A-2, the Buffalo I was heavier, with armour protection for the pilot and despite the removal of the naval equipment needed in the F2A-2, the Buffalo I was woefully underpowered being around 900 lbs heavier. Top speed was reduced from 344 mph to 330 mph, manoeuvrability was reduced and landing proved difficult for new pilots.

 

Catalina IB (PBY-5B)

The PBY-5B was powered by Pratt & Whitney R-1830-82 engines and used Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers. The PBY-5 had a redesigned squared off rudder, and new horizontal stabilisers and elevators. It was the last true flying boat Catalina.

 

P40 A Tomahawk IIb

Armament: 2 x .50in and 4 x .303in or 4x. 303in

Powered by a 1150hp Allison engine, the Tomahawk's speed and performance closed the gap between the Bf-109 and the previous Hurricanes. Its two 12.7mm guns mounted above the engine,and four wing-mounted .303 brownings, gave the aircraft a better chance of matching the German aircraft's fire-power. A manoeuvrable enough machine which performed well at low altitudes and was well suited to the desert warfare conditions, after some problems were overcome and the RAAF technicians had modified the aircraft. These “Hotrods” sometimes had the .50 Machine guns stripped and, or the engines modified (unofficially of course!) to Boost power.

 

Boomerang MkI/MkII-see in game

 

Kittyhawk Mk IA

Armament: 6x 12.7 mm guns and provision for 454 kg (1,000 lb) of bombs or 4x 12.7 mm guns

Project X was the code name for the Curtiss Kittyhawk Mk IA P-40E but to the RAAF it was the A-29 . This fighter was a single-seat aircraft powered by a V-1710-39 Allison In-line liquid cooled engine. The armament was six M2 0.50 inch calibre Browning machine guns, mounted in the wings. The airframe was manufactured primarily from aluminium although the control surfaces were fabric covered. This aircraft saw extensive service with Australian forces from North Africa to the Pacific, These aircraft were on occasion (ok, extensively) modified to counter the better German or Japanese aircraft in their area of operations, from stripping out guns, filters, or armour to attain better performance. The P-40 still gave stellar service being key to winning the battles in Milne bay.

 

Kittyhawk Mk II Rolls Royce-engined Merlin

Armament:4 or 6 x .50-in guns

3 Squadron RAAF the only unit in the RAAF that received the Rolls Royce-engined Kittyhawk I's.

These P-40L variant aircraft saw service in the Mediterranean and North African theatre, while high altitude performance was still lacking, these aircraft where substantially better in every way over previous aircraft.

 

Martin Baltimore MK 3

Powerplant: two l,660-hp(1238-kW) Wright Cyclone GR-2600-19 radial piston engines the MK3 carried over 700gals of internal fuel, giving it a 5 ½ hour flight duration this came at the expence of the bombload but was ideal for mediterranean operations.

Armament: four .303in wing-mounted Browning machineguns, two (or four) .303-in Browning guns in a Boulton-Paul dorsal turret and two .303in Brownings in ventral position, plus four fixed .303 scatter-guns in the tail.

a maximum bombload of 4x500lb GP bombs

A powerful and much modified version of the Martin Maryland light bomber, the Martin Model 187 Baltimore was produced specifically for the Commonwealth.

RAAF Baltimore Mk III bombers went into action during 1942 completing long range naval sorties across the Aegean. a power operated Boulton-Paul turret was installed in this version with either two or four 7,7-mm (0.303-in) Browning machine-guns.

 

Avenger II aka TBF-1C (tarpon II)

“The first TBF-1 Avengers to reach Britain were given the designation Tarpon I. The Tarpon name was retained until January 1944 when the FAA adopted the American name, so the Tarpon I became the Avenger I, the Tarpon II the Avenger II and the Tarpon III the Avenger III. It is normally stated that this change was made to avoid confusion, but the summary of Naval Operations produced for the War Cabinet covering this period states that the change was made 'in deference to the wishes of the American manufacturers'.” (historyofwar.org)

The Avenger II or TBF-1C removed the earlier .30in gun and replaced it with two .50in guns in the wings. Unlike in USN planes the rear seat was kept by coastal command. Slight modifications were made to the engine which had a single scoop at the top of the cowling and one cowl flap on each side of the fuselage. This combination was unique to the -1C - the more powerful engine in theTBM-3 required more cowl flaps and a second scoop. The Avenger II was 500lb heavier than the Avenger I, and its top speed was reduced to 242mph at sea level and 257mph at 12,000ft.

 

Martlet II

The Martlet II used the same Wright R-1830-90 engine as the F4F-3A, with a single stage two-speed supercharger and was equipped with six .50in guns in folding wings as used on the F4F-4. The Martlet II was used on carriers, seeing action in the Mediterranean in 1941-3, including during Operation Torch, and also during the invasion of Madagascar.

 

D520

 

D521

 

P400

 

P40N Kittyhawk Kittyhawk Mk IV (kittybomber)

Armament:6 x .50-in guns 1x 1000lb gp bomb 2x 500lb bombs or 6x 250's

RAAF and Dutch 120sqn piloted P40N aircraft

The P-40N-40 was powered by the V-1710-115 engine of 1360 hp and also featured metal-covered

ailerons. The model included improved non-metallic self-sealing fuel tanks, new radio and

oxygen equipment, and flame-damping exhausts.

 

Hellcat F 1-see in game

 

B25 Mitchell II

In 1942, the RAAF accepted a number of Mitchells on behalf of the Dutch Government. These aircraft equipped No 18 (Dutch East Indies) Squadron and flew with mixed crews with mostly Australian gunners, by 1945, 150 Mitchells of various marks had been received.

In April 1944, No 2 Squadron replaced its Beauforts with Mitchells and the first 39 aircraft were transferred from No 18 Dutch East Indies Squadron but only a small number of these were taken on with No 2 sqn as they lacked defensive armament and naby had suffered serverlly due to enemy action in the NEI Sqn.. A total of 50 Mitchells were operated by No 2 Squadron including 30 Mitchell IIs and 20 Mitchell IIIs . The Mitchells of No 2 sqn and 18 Dutch East Indies Squadrons formed No 79 Wing, and these aircraft carried out many successful strikes against enemy targets. Powered by twin Wright Cyclone R-2600-13 engines and fuel capacity was increased to 974 gallons. Though some RAAF aircraft retained the flat navigators window of earlier versions and had the heaters and oxygen systems removed. The gun turrets were improved and fitted with 12.7mm browning guns though the dorsal turret remained to the rear of the aircraft’s mid way between the wing and tail-units . Capacity for external bomb racks was included with stronger wings to support the extra weight. The aircraft was given the ability to carry at 2,000 lb torpedo under the bomb bay when the bay doors were removed. Further RAAF modifications took place in the field. These included the addition of tail or waist guns with 12.7mm machine guns positioned in specially cut windows in beam positions and a added tail gun was fitted with a single 12.7mm machine gun in the RAAF version. The South West Pacific Theatre changed the way the aircraft was utilised. Low level strafing and skip bombing attacks were preferred against naval targets with low level bombing with delayed fuse bombs against airfields and ground targets. A number of RAAF B-25s had the bomb sight removed and the nose faired over with aluminium sheeting, where extra 12.7mm machine guns were fitted in the nose instead bringing the total up to four. forward firing guns could also be attached to the side of the fuselage in blister packs to increase this number by an additional four 12.7mm browning machine guns. This trend for increased fire-power was to be improved on in later versions. This aircraft was able to carry one 18in torpedo or a selection of one 2000lb HC bomb two 1,000 pound bombs, six 500lb bombs, eight 250lb bombs or up to twelve 100lb bombs, in addition up to eight 100lb or 250lbs bombs could be carried with any combinations of internal ordinance in the under wing bomb racks, this did reduce range and performance however.

 

Martlet IV

The Martlet IV (also known as F4F-4B) was a product of Lend-Lease. Two hundred and twenty Martlet IVs were delivered between February and November 1942. They were powered by the Wright R-1820-40B Cyclone engine, again with a single-stage two-speed supercharger. The Martlet IV shared the same six-gun wings as the F4F-4.

 

Corsair I-see in game

B25 Mitchell III

This was the version produced in the largest numbers fitted with the more reliable Wright R-2600-29 and with earlier modifications standardised and additional armour to protect pilots and bombardier’s. This version retained the defensive fire-power of the Mitchell II, with two waist turrets, one dorsal turret mounted forward and a tail turret with twin 12.7mm browning guns. The bomb bay was altered to allow a third 1,000 pound bomb to fit or alternatively 2x1600lb AP bombs or the standard combination of 12x100lb bombs 8x250lb or 6x500lb bombs, in addition 8x100lb bombs or 8x250lbs bombs could be carried in the under wing bomb racks . Most B-25s were built with strap-on gun packs on the side of the fuselage, although these were often removed in the field. A variety of other combinations of guns were also fitted in the field to suit particular circumstances. A small number had a solid armoured nose containing eight 12.7mm browning machine guns, for use in the ground attack role.

 

 

Mustang I-see in game

 

Mustang II-see in game

 

Corsair II-see in game

 

Hellcat FII / NF II-see in game

 

Typhoon Ib [e]-see in game

Mustang Ia-see in game

 

Mustang III-see in game

 

Welkin FI- descritption pending

 

Fortress IIa-see in game

 

CAC 18 Mk23 Mustang IV

Armament:6 x12.7mm guns with various under-wing stores. 8 to 10 hvar or 60lb warhead rockets or 2x100lb HE, 2x250lb HE, 2x500lb HE or SAP. The majority of Mk23's were Powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin 70 engines though some earlier models retained the Merlin 66 engines of the CAC-17 Mustang

 

Fortress III-see in game

 

Liberator VI (B24J Liberator)

Australian aircrew were intimately associated with the B-24 during the later war years,

probably in their largest numbers as members of RAF Bomber and Coastal Commands. The RAAF did not receive its first B-24s until February 1944 and these were theatre transferred ex-combat aircraft from the 90th and 380th Heavy Bombardment Groups of the USAAF, fit only for training. It was not until 6 July 1944 that the first operational flight of a RAAF Liberator was made, meaning that the type had an operational history in the RAAF of just 13 months. The RAAF was well aware of its unbalanced force without a four-engine bomber and had tried unsuccessfully for almost two years prior to this to obtain Liberators both direct from the USA and from RAF Lend-Lease stocks. At the same time the government was making every effort to get an equivalent RAF bomber design built in Australia. Apart from the 13 camouflaged theatre transfers, the remaining 275 Liberators were brand new and all operated in natural metal finish (NMF). Some attention must be made to the myriad of differences between models, field conversions and production blocks, but as a whole most aircraft where to the “J” standard.

 

New premiums considerations

DB-7A Havoc II NF

Armament: 12 .303in machine guns

The Havoc II NF was in actual fact the French DB-7A's ordered from the US just as the war broke, powered by the Pratt & Whitney R-2600-A5B Double Cyclones. The original French DB7A was designed to fly short range Attack missions, It was faster than the Boston III. But lacked Range, Bomb load and had no defensive weapons and so suited the night-fighter role. The Havoc II Night Fighter used a solid nose designed by Martin Baker it contained twelve 0.303in guns and ammunition.

 

[/spoiler]

 

I've recently been invited to give an interview to Bis18marck70 and RAMJB for their brand new War Thunder podcast, the Cuban Eight. Please make sure to check out their channels!

 

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddzF4_6CYRo[/media]

 

Our project was also featured on wbe886's channel. Go ahead and subscribe, you won't regret it!

 

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZlgYABAMBQ[/media]

 

Changelog

 

EDIT 1 - Added branch descriptions from our project members.

 

EDIT 2 - Added LB95's stunning graphic version of the tree. IT'S AWESOME!

 

EDIT 4 - Added anglomanii's notes about Australian aircraft.

 

EDIT 5 - Added the YT video.

 

EDIT 6 - Added anglomanii's premium aircraft descriptions.

 

EDIT 7 - Added a link to an unofficial discussion about our project on Reddit.

 

EDIT 8 - Added wbe886's short review of the tree.

Edited by Rautaa
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Chaps and girls stand down and let me tell you about what flies and floats the flying boats:

 

 

Rank 2 Saro Lerwick

300px-Saro_Lerwick_takeoff.jpg
 
Introduce in 1940 the Saro Lerwick was a Long Range Maritime Patrol flying boat and anti-submarine aircraft. It was powered by 2 Bristol Hercules II radial Engines developing 1,375 hp (1,026 kW) each.
 
Armed with one x303(7.7mm) Vickers K gun in the bow turret and two x0.303 in(7.7mm) Browning Machine guns in the dorsal turret and 4 in the tail turret. And up to 2,000 lb (900 kg) of bombs or depth charges
 
 

 

Rank 3 Short Sunderland Mk I

742641.jpg

 

Introduced in 1938 the Short Sunderland Mk I was a long range bomber flying boat. Powered by 4 × Bristol Pegasus XVIII nine-cylinder radial engine, 1,065 hp (794 kW) each

Armed with: 2,000 lb (910 kg) of bombs (usually 250 or 500 lb), mines (1,000 lb) and
    7× 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns(turrets)

    4x 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns(nose mounted)

    2x Browning 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) machine gun

 

 

Rank 4 Short Sunderland Mk III

Short_Sunderland_MkIII.jpg

 

Introduced in 1941 the Short Sunderland Mk III was a long range bomber flying boat. Powered by 4 × Bristol Pegasus XVIII nine-cylinder radial engine, 1,065 hp (794 kW) each

Armed with: 2,000 lb (910 kg) of bombs (usually 250 or 500 lb), mines (1,000 lb) and
    16× 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns

     2× Browning 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) machine gun

 

 

Rank 5 Short Sunderland Mk V

250px-Short_Sunderland_Mk_V_ExCC.jpg

 

Introduced in 1945 the Short Sunderland Mk V was a long range bomber flying boat. Powered by 4 × Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp 1,200 hp (895 kW) each

Armed with: 2,000 lb (910 kg) of bombs (usually 250 or 500 lb), mines (1,000 lb) and
    16× 0.303 inch (7.7 mm) Browning machine guns

     2× Browning 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) machine gun

 

 

Rank 8 Short Seaford

 7921.jpg

Introduced in 1944 The Short S.45 Seaford was a 1940s flying boat, designed as a long range maritime patrol bomber. Powered by: 4 × Bristol Hercules XIX radial engines, 1,720 hp (1,283 kW) each

 

Armed with:

    Guns: 6 × .50 in Browning machine guns (two each in nose and tail turrets and two beam guns), 2 x 20 mm Hispano cannon in dorsal turret and 2 × fixed .303 in Browning machine gun
    Bombs: 4,960 lb (2,250 kg) of bombs and depth charges

 

 

EDIT: Corrected my mistake with the Seaford's rank.

Edited by Linx6
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She's done :D

 

Seems to be the version I have. This is 7.6, correct? I have an... idea. Just wanna check if my file is up to date.

Edited by LB95
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She's done :D

 

Seems to be the version I have. This is 7.6, correct? I have an... idea. Just wanna check if my file is up to date.

I think yes.

Edited by Linx6
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ITS WITH NOT GOD DAMN WHIT HOLY xxxx floral GAAAH

Coastal Command: Where gunships fly and planes swim.

And I keep saying whit even when I know it's with. I fixed it.

Edited by Linx6
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Yes, yes, we know Electric Canberra *rolleyes*

 

Good job btw, +1

 

But I dont think that this could be done at least 2 years if we think the heavy load on Gaijin teams.

Edited by Century
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Dis. Don't be quick to jump into conclusions. Devs be very sad. ;~;

Why would they be sad?

Edited by Linx6
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Good stuff lads , the finished product looks amazing.

 

If we can even get a few of these into the devs notebooks , that's a win :salute:

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I still have to wonder if it makes more sense to have the Meteors on the heavy fighter line (and by extension, the Vampires and the Venom on the "Spitfire" line). I know that historically the Meteors were used as fighters and the Vampires and Venoms were used as fighter-bombers, but it just seems sensible to have the twin engined Meteor follow on from the Mossies and Hornets.

 

 

Also; WOO, SEAFORD! 

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I still have to wonder if it makes more sense to have the Meteors on the heavy fighter line (and by extension, the Vampires and the Venom on the "Spitfire" line). I know that historically the Meteors were used as fighters and the Vampires and Venoms were used as fighter-bombers, but it just seems sensible to have the twin engined Meteor follow on from the Mossies and Hornets.

 

 

Also; WOO, SEAFORD! 

 

With the exception of the F8 "Reaper" model , Meteors where always interceptors like the Spitfire was.

 

Having the Venom and Vampire with the Twins makes more sense as they were the multi role attacker/fighter/bombers rather than putting the Meteors in the mix. :salute:

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With the exception of the F8 "Reaper" model , Meteors where always interceptors like the Spitfire was.

 

Having the Venom and Vampire with the Twins makes more sense as they were the multi role attacker/fighter/bombers rather than putting the Meteors in the mix. :salute:

And that is why they where placed there. And because in game the Vampire is there.

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This is a little side project I've been working on for the better part of the past 2 hours.

 

I personally think it's a nice way to get the tree across visually. And I'd be happy to finish it.

 

What do you guys think?

 

66a0b088be.png

Edited by LB95
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LB95.. for my part have at it.. if you can't get the latest from Firefly, i can rummage around and see if i have the final..

 

also, did anyone finish the Premiums Descriptive section, or did i have to finish that, i've been busy with that other project i forgot what was happening.?

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Oh and by the way.. next is tanks. i think.... but it will be commonwealth only.. i think we still have to start work on that yet and put up a call for those interested..

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Just finished off the Hawker line. Think this' a good example of my work, as it has everything I have to do in there: From just copying existing planes to outright creating their slot.

6604f61eca.png

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Just finished off the Hawker line. Think this' a good example of my work, as it has everything I have to do in there: From just copying existing planes to outright creating their slot.

6604f61eca.png

Not bad for a first draft but it will need some more polish.

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Not bad for a first draft but it will need some more polish.

Yeah the colour transition is way too harsh, and the Hawk's position is a little off. Think I'm gonna get all of the sprites done and then tweak each one after.

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