kleinerPanzer

BT-7 Artillery: High-Speed Support

Would you like to see the BT-7 Artillery in-game?  

44 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you like to see the BT-7 Artillery in-game?

    • Yes, in the tech tree
      32
    • Yes, as a premium (please explain)
      5
    • Yes, as a gift/rare (please explain)
      7
    • No (please explain)
      0


The BT-7 Artillery (Often referred to incorrectly as BT-7A) was a Soviet light tank/SPG from the late 1930's, created in an attempt to provide an infantry-support version of the successful BT-7 cavalry tanks. In-game there exists a version, the BT-7A (F-32), which is a modified and up-gunned version of the BT-7 Artillery, which, in a standard configuration, hosted the KT-28 gun as found on the T-35 and T-26-4. 

 

809628_original.jpg

A partially reconstructed BT-7 Artillery in Verkhnyaya Pyshma. Most of the turret has been re-created from scratch, but many of the large components, such as hatches, gun mounts, etc are original. The hull is mostly original.

 

OVERVIEW

 

The BT-7 Artillery is very similar to the current BT-7 with one exception: the firepower. In lieu of the 45 mm Tank Gun Model 1932/38 (20-K) , it receives the 76 mm Tank Gun Model 1927/32 (KT-28), a derivative of the 76 mm Regimental Gun Model 1927. This is also housed in a new cylindrical turret similar to that of the T-26-4. 

 

In-game, it would function as a firepower upgrade over the standard BT-7 and provide the USSR with a fast-moving high-powered gun at the low ranks.

 

Images

Spoiler

Image result for bt-7aImage result for bt-7aImage result for bt-7aWoMOTIeutms.jpgImage result for bt-7aImage

ukBkoJ11O50.jpg

Image

Imager-JMxoLCKT0.jpgBT_7A_02.jpg

CvgiP9-H31M.jpg

6gBlrORRKGc.jpg

qDUEmpNtV7M.jpg

BT_7A_21-6.jpg

 

78TeKiooY3k.jpg1PKrx4CpCrU.jpg

BT-7_A-fast-tank-ukraine-1941-01.jpg

refugees, BT-7A

BT_7A_05.jpg

BT_7A_24.jpg

BT_7A_13.jpg

BT_7A_07.jpg

BT_7A_09.jpg

BT_7A_14.jpg

BT_7A_16.jpg

BT_7A_18.jpg

Image result for bt-7a821013_original.jpg821527_original.jpg822167_original.jpg822432_original.jpg820896_original.jpg

The KT-28 in its mounting inside the tank

 

The BT-7 Artillery was also tested with guns L-11 and F-32, the latter of which is already in-game.

R7xrvp8odmM.jpgBdb3-IDs-iU.jpg (823×493)

Above, the BT-7 Artillery with L-11. Below, the BT-7 Artillery with F-32.

b8V-WRH5HIU.jpg5l3l9i_pEGU.jpg

HzjngqzvfTE.jpg

Nnf7OKlTOM4.jpg

 

HISTORY

 

Our story starts not with the BT-7, but rather, with the T-26. Specifically, the T-26-4.

 

Soon after the T-26's conception as the Red Army's new infantry support tank, it became evident that the twin 7,62 mm machine guns and later the 45 mm anti-tank gun were not suited for that job. As such, in 1933, plans to install a 76 mm Regimental Gun Model 1927 were made. Within a little over a year, a new turret was developed to house the larger KT-28 gun (a modification of the aforementioned regimental gun). Five prototypes were produced and testing commenced.

 

In September 1935, a disaster involving the operation of the gun on one of the T-26-4 prototypes led to an immediate halt of testing. The KT-28 gun, while it was meant to be replaced by a more modern gun, was thrown out. The T-26-4 project died with it.

 

Some time earlier, in 1934, the final designs were being brushed up for the new BT-7, and improvement on the BT-5 which entered service the previous year. Not long after the BT-7 entered production, it was noted that an infantry-support gun for the BT-7 was also a viable idea. The BT tanks and T-26's had shared turrets before—the T-26 Model 1933 and BT-5 used the same cylindrical turret with the 45 mm 20-K mounted inside. In April 1935, one of the T-26-4 turrets was sent from the T-26 factory (presumably No. 174 in Omsk) to the BT factory in Kharkov (KhPZ). Upon some revisions, the turret was mounted onto a standard BT-7 hull and sent to trials in October. Curiously, this occurred after the testing disaster of the T-26-4 with the KT-28 gun (which was also found on the prototype BT-7), yet testing was allowed to continue.

 

The tank was successfully trialed. In 1936, a pre-production run of 5 tanks was produced, and in late 1937, full production commenced. By January 1938, after only a few months of production and over 150 tanks produced, production was halted due to the discontinuation of the KT-28 gun. The majority of the vehicles entered service with the Red Army, with about a dozen remaining unarmed, while at least one was kept behind to support further weapons testing.  After some meddling with the L-11 and F-32 guns, the latter was decided to replace the KT-28 for the new production batch of BT-7 Artillery tanks. However, the breakout of war with Germany in 1941 prevented this plan from being fulfilled. 

 

There were some modifications made to the serial BT-7 Artillery. For one, the turret was modernized from the T-26-4's original design. It featured twin circular hatches, mounting points for a roof machine gun, and 11 tanks were built as command tanks with the 71-TK-3 radio installation and horseshoe antenna. The turret ring as likely widened, and features on the engine deck were reduced to stay clear of the larger turret. Additional optics were added, primarily as periscopes, and the rear machine gun mounting was slightly revised. The suspension was edited to account for the change in weight distribution. A considerable number of the BT-7 Artillery tanks actually used the P-40 anti-aircraft machine gun mount as well.

 

Of the over 150 tanks produced, only around 120 BT-7 Artillery that engaged the Germans in 1941, fighting alongside standar BT-7 as though they were regular tanks. They were all but lost by the end of the year. There is a sole document dating to February 1944 which mentions briefly a BT-7 with a 76 mm howitzer installation, but nothing more. 

 

The BT-7 Artillery could be considered a success. After all, it was the first proper Soviet 'artillery tank', and its basic concepts would lead to vehicles such as the KV-2, KV-9, and more.

 

At least one source states that, unlike standard BT tanks, the BT-7 Artillery could not run with wheels only due to the increased weight. This seems dubious as it is less than one ton heavier than the standard BT-7.

 

STATISTICS

Crew

3 (Driver, Gunner, Loader)

Length

5.66 m

Width

2.23 m

Height

2.42 m

Ground Clearance

0.40 m

Weight

14.0 t

Ground Pressure

0.74 kg/cm2

Track-Ground Contact

3.6 m long, 0.26 m wide

Engine

M-17T V12 petrol
500 hp at 1750 rpm

Power-to-Weight Ratio

32.14 hp/t

Transmission

3 forward, 1 reverse

Speed

Tracked: 50 km/h (road), 35 km/h (cross-country)

Wheeled: 72 km/h (road), 50 km/h (cross-country)

Fuel

790 L 

Range

Tracked: 350 km (road),  km (cross-country) 

Wheeled: 500 km (road), km (cross-country)

Vertical Obstacle

0.75 m

Trench-Crossing

2.00 m

Max Gradient

84% (40°)

Max Fording Depth

1.20 m

Armor

Hull:

 20 mm front

 20 mm sides (front)

 20 mm sides (rear)

 10 mm rear (top)

 13 mm rear (bottom)

 10 mm roof

  6 mm floor

Turret:

 20 mm front

 20 mm sides

 20 mm rear

 10 mm roof

Smoke

None

Armament

1x KT-28

2/3x DT

Primary

76,2 mm KT-28 (50 Rounds)

 Elevation: Manual, -4 to +40°

 Traverse: Manual, ±180°, 9.5°/s

Secondary

7,62 mm DT x2/3 (3339 Rounds)

Coaxial:

 Traverse: Manual, -20° to +30°

 Elevation: Manual, 10° left, 20°right

Rear:
 Traverse: Manual, -20° to +30°

 Elevation: Manual, ±10°

AA: (Optional)

 Traverse: Manual

 Elevation: Manual

 

SOURCES

1 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BT_tank

2 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BT-7

3 - https://tanks-encyclopedia.com/ww2/soviet/bt-7-artillery

4 - https://tanks-encyclopedia.com/ww2/soviet/soviet_BT-7.php

5 - https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/БТ-7

6 - https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/БТ-7А

7 - Russian Tanks of World War II - Stalin's Armoured Might by Tim Bean & Will Fowler

8 - http://tankarchives.blogspot.com/2015/08/world-of-tanks-history-section-bt-7.html

9 - http://tankarchives.blogspot.com/2016/05/late-war-rarities.html - CAMD RF 38-11355-2268

10 - http://tankarchives.blogspot.com/2013/12/t-26-upgrades.html - Report on experimental works at OKMO for January

11 - http://www.wardrawings.be/WW2/Files/1-Vehicles/Allies/2-USSR/02-FastTanks/BT/Data/BT-7A.htm

12 - http://www.wardrawings.be/WW2/Files/1-Vehicles/Allies/2-USSR/02-FastTanks/BT/File/3-Models.htm#BT5A

13 - http://aviarmor.net/tww2/tanks/ussr/bt-7a.htm

 

 

Edited by HugoTroop
  • Upvote 3
medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 to this, I think it would be a very fun tier 1 vehicle to see in the game.  

 

Thank you for making more low-tier suggestions of common vehicles, I'd rather have more of these than prototype modern MBTs any day.  :salute:

  • Like 1
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it would be a good premium.  +1

 

The reason that I am for it as a premium is that the Russian tree is pretty laden with goodies, and as a premium Gaijin could make some more $$ and perhaps sort out some long standing issues.

 

Edited by Valcour
Added comment
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Valcour said:

I think it would be a good premium.  +1

 

The reason that I am for it as a premium is that the Russian tree is pretty laden with goodies, and as a premium Gaijin could make some more $$ and perhaps sort out some long standing issues.

 


I would love to see it in-game, preferably in the tech tree for me as we already have the BT with the T-34’s 76mm as a reward / marketplace vehicle. 

medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 27/01/2020 at 23:20, Valcour said:

I think it would be a good premium.  +1

 

The reason that I am for it as a premium is that the Russian tree is pretty laden with goodies, and as a premium Gaijin could make some more $$ and perhaps sort out some long standing issues.

 

 

I can see your point of view, but personally I'd rather see it replace the T-26-4 in the standard tree (though obviously in the BT line). T-26-4 was only ever a prototype, and its place in the game is somewhat questionable now that the DeMarre changes nerfed its AP to barely-acceptable levels. The T-26-4, as with the regular T-26, is slow and poorly armoured, and since Italy and France were added there are now several vehicles even at Reserve rank that it cannot pierce easily or at all, while the opposite is hardly true. BT-7A, while equivalently-armed, would have the BT-7's excellent speed on its side, allowing it to take up more advantageous positions or strike from the flanks, rather than get caught lumbering across the open as T-26-4 now often is. Though my argument is mainly a gameplay thing, historically, BT-7A actually did replace T-26-4 (albeit indirectly), since after T-26-4's cancellation due to a malfunction in trials, its turret design was developed further for the BT-7A. All things considered, I feel like there are better options for premiums than a production tank with the potential to solve an actual problem in the tree. Something like the comparable BT-5A, which was built in much smaller numbers, could work for that, or the BT-SV sloped-armour prototype for a higher-tier (and therefore more expensive) premium that would most likely sell better than either artillery BT, since it's a fairly iconic tank. I'm as sick as anyone of the Soviet tree getting vehicles instead of nations with a more pressing need, but in this case I think it'd be a justified addition. 

Edited by Zombificus
medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.