kleinerPanzer

T-34 Model 1943 (early): Speed is Key

T-34 (1943) (early)  

29 members have voted

  1. 1. Should the T-34 Model 1943 (early) be implemented?

    • Yes, in the tech tree
      27
    • Yes, as a premium (please explain)
      0
    • Yes, as a gift/rare (please explain)
      0
    • No (please explain)
      2


The early-production T-34 Model 1943 greatly resembled the Model 1942 to the point that they are almost indistinguishable, worsened by the poor records and inaccurate naming system of Soviet tank models.

 

File:T-34-76 Medium Tank (37661605271).jpg

A T-34 Model 1942 or 1943 in Kubinka. The fenders are incorrect and probably taken from a T-34-85. Otherwise, the tank looks to be in good shape. This vehicle carries design features of No. 183 Plant UTZ, some of which are unique.

 

OVERVIEW

The early Model 1943 was differentiated from the Model 1942 solely by the new armor construction methods, a thicker roof, and a new 5-speed transmission. Otherwise, it has the armor profile of the Model 1942 (save the roof) and the mobility of a T-34-85. These differences would not be enough to warrant an increased BR, more than likely.

 

Images

Spoiler

Image result for t-34 hex

A captured Model 1942 or 1943. The boxy rear stowage bins are not present, but due to the fact that this vehicle is captured, it is possible that they were simply removed and were actually part of the production.

Image result for t-34 hex

Another example. The rounded remains of the fenders are visible, as well as an atypical configuration of road wheels. 

Image result for t-34 hex

Another captured example. 

 

HISTORY

 

Copy-pasted from my previous T-34 Model 1943 suggestion: https://forum.warthunder.com/index.php?/topic/457424-t-34-model-1943-last-of-the-legend/

 

 

Production of the familiar Hexagonal turret of the T-34 Model 1942 began in April 1942. This was a substantial improvement over the original rounded turret, providing a more ergonomic interior. However, the same troubles of the 2-man turret crew and subpar vision devices remained. 

 

In August 1942, trials of a new transmission, idler, and cupola were conducted. After testing, only the new transmission was approved for production, while the idler and cupola underwent further testing. Additionally, various other improvements, such as new engine ventilation, a 20-mm thick roof, and new armor welding techniques, led to the creation of an overall superior tank. The mass production of this specification of tank began in December 1942, and was the new T-34 Model 1943. This early model is the variant I am suggesting. The weight of this tank was increased to 30 tons from the 29.8 of the Model 1942. It was probably at the same time that the box-shaped rear stowage bins were deleted from production at Factory No. 183 UTZ, although they would still be found on Factory No. 112's late T-34 Model 1941/42 tanks.

 

In June 1943, production of the Hexagonal turret with the cupola was approved for production. The cupola contained five vision slits in the sides. The hatch was split into two pieces. An additional Mk. IV periscope was also added for the loader, mirroring the PTK-5 periscope for the gunner.*  Production likely started first at Factory No. 183 UTZ, but quickly spread to the other 5 factories then producing the T-34. By decree, all factories should have produced T-34 Model 1943s with the cupola by September.

 

Despite the fact that the cupola was much needed as an addition to the T-34 to improve its battlefield functionality, it turned out to be very sub-par. The vision devices were too high up to be usable, and the two-piece hatch created all sorts of problems. Most of all, the gunner-commander which used the cupola was too busy firing the main gun to actually make use of the cupola, effectively making it useless. 

 

At some other point along the production period, presumably in early 1944, the round fuel drums as found on the T-34-85s were also added to Model 1943 production (with the cupola). Later on, the spare tracks stored on the fenders were deleted, as on the T-34-85. T-34-85s began production in January 1944, while the Model 1943 ended technically in September, although the vast majority stopped in March. Also around this time, likely coinciding with T-34-85 production, the nose of the hull was changed from the rounded shape to the angular shape. This setup of the T-34 Model 1943 was how production was completed.

 

*This was the production order. However, it was not uncommon to see twin PTK-5 periscopes or twin Mk. IV periscopes, as some of the photographic examples show.

 

STATISTICS

Crew

4 (Driver, Gunner, Loader, Radio Operator)

Length

6.07 m

Width

2.95 m

Height

2.604 m

Ground Clearance

0.4 m

Weight

30.0 t (sources vary by +/- 1.0 t)

Ground Pressure

~0.7 kg/cm2 (no agreement between sources)

Track-Ground Contact

3.84 m long, 0.55 m wide

Engine

V-2-34 V12 diesel
500 hp at 1800 rpm

Power-to-Weight Ratio

16.6 hp/t

Transmission

5 forward, 1 reverse

Speed

55 km/h (road), 30 km/h (cross-country)

Fuel

540 L

Range

300 km (road), 180 km (cross-country)

Wall-Climbing

0.7 m

Trench-Crossing

2.5 m

Max Gradient

35%

Max Fording Depth

1.3 m

Armor

Hull:

 45 mm front

 45 mm sides

 45 mm rear

 20 mm roof

 13 mm floor

Turret:

 45 mm front

 45 mm sides

 45 mm rear

 20 mm roof

Smoke

None

Armament

1x F-34

2x DT

Primary

76,2 mm F-34 (77 Rounds) (others say 100 Rounds)

Elevation: Manual, -5 to +28°

Traverse: Powered, 360°, 17.5°/s (this is Gaijin's stock number; sources do not agree at all)

Secondary

7,62 mm DT x2 (1890 Rounds)

Coaxial:

Traverse: Same as primary armament

Elevation: Same as primary armament

Hull:

 Traverse: Manual, +/- 12°

 Elevation: Manual, -6 to +16°

 

MINUTIA

Copy-pasted from my other T-34 Model 1943 suggestion.

Spoiler

1 - The T-34 Model 1943 could be fitted with various types of road wheels. Using S = Spoke, S/ = Spoke without tires, and D = Dish, the following arrangements are seen:

SSSSS

SDDDS

SS/SS/S

SDSDS

DDDDD

SSS/SS

DDSDD

and several more rarer types

2 - Fenders were always rounded

3 - Tracks were not fitted to the front hull

4 - The round-edged turrets produced with the steel press also existed in Model 1943 standard, but is not what is being suggested

 

SOURCES

 

1 - https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Т-34

2 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-34

3 - Soviet Tanks in Combat 1941-1945: The T-28, T-34, T-34-85 and T-44 Medium Tanks by Steven J. Zaloga, Jim Kinnear, Andrey Aksenov & Aleksandr Koshchavtsev 

4 - https://erenow.net/ww/russian-armour-in-the-second-world-war/3.php

5 - ТАНК Т-34 РУКОВОДСТВО ВТОРОЕ ИСПРАВЛЕННОЕ ИЗДАНИЕ ВОЕННОЕ ИЗДАТЕЛЬСТВО НАРОДНОГО КОМИССАРИАТА ОБОРОНЫ МОСКВА - 1944

6 - https://ww2-weapons.com/t-34-tank/

7 - http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/weapons_t-34_production.html

8 - http://tankarchives.blogspot.com/2016/03/t-34-improvements-1943.html

9 - http://tankarchives.blogspot.com/2016/09/tank-improvements.html

10 - http://tankarchives.blogspot.com/2015/10/t-34-commander-cupolas.html

Edited by HugoTroop
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 4
medal medal medal medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Open for discussion. :salute:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.