Do you want to see a unique variant of the Blackburn Buccaneer, in this case the SAAF Buccaneer S Mk.50?   

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  1. 1. Do you want to see a unique variant of the Blackburn Buccaneer, in this case the SAAF Buccaneer S Mk.50?

    • yes!
      60
    • no
      2


 SAAF Blackburn Buccaneer S Mk.50

'Easy Rider'

 

> Export to South Africa

In spite of the Buccaneer's undoubted qualities, export success for the aircraft was distinctly limited.Sadly this is probably due to having been labelled a 'naval' aircraft and in the part to the British Government's somewhat ineptitude with foreign governments! Had Blackburn been able to negotiate directly with the US air force or West German military authorities, things may have been different. After all, the NA.39 was carefully studied by the American authorities in 1957 under the terms of the Mutual Weapons Development Program (MWDP) treaty, and later declared the project 'sound'.Unfortunately, it was not to be and instead the US Government placed significant orders for the Grumman YA2F (later A-6) Intruder aircraft for their Navy.Similarly, negotiations had been conducted by the British Government officials with West Germany military officials for an aircraft to replace the British-built Sea Hawk Mk.100 and the 101 then in service with the Bundesmarine. It seems that negotiations were not conducted in a suitably professional manner and the large order went to Lockheed for their F-104 Starfighter. Thankfully, negotiations between Britain and the South African Government fared a little better, success for the Buccaneer.

 

> Simonstown Agreement

In 1962, discussions with the South African Government regarding a possible order for the SAAF (South African Airforce) become detailed. The subject of the negotiations was the S.2 variant , which at that time had not taken to the air. However, it did include a significant number of changes to meet the 'hot and high' airfield operations.The contract was signed in January 1963 for 16 Buccaneer S Mk.50, as the SAAF variant had become known. At the time of the negotiations, Britain and South Africa were operating under the Simonstown Agreement - whereby Britain offered South Africa maritime equipment and weapons to defend the vital trade routes around the Cape of Good Hope. Following the closure of the Suez Canal in 1956, these routes had become of great importance to Britain and Europe. In addition to he defense of the trade routes, Britain was also granted base facilities at Simonstown, near Cape Town.

 

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> Rocket Powered

The SAAF Buccaneer S.50's were basically similar to the Royal Navy S.2 aircraft, but were fitted with a pair of Bristol Siddeley BS.605 single-chamber,retractable, auxiliary rockets in the rear fuselage to improve take-off performance in the 'hot and high' situations. These rocket motors were powered by a mixture of kerosene drawn from the aircraft's standard fuel supply and HTP (high-test peroxide), held 8,000lb of thrust for 30 seconds. As a result, the total thrust installed was over 30,000lb - significantly better than the 14,000lb of thrust of the Gryron Junior-powered Buccaneer S.1 The main innovation on the S.50 was the enlarged slipper tank, which could accommodate 430 imperial gallons of additional fuel.

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The first S.50-serial number 411, class B markings as 'G-2-1'

 

The first S.50-serial number 411, which operated under class B markings as 'G-2-1' made its first flight on 9 January 1965. Trials made the new rocket motors were soon completed satisfactory, as were the trails with the underwing armament of four Nord AS30 guided missiles. The S.50 did not feature hydraulic wing-folding capabilities, but was able to fold its wings manually.It had been decided that all 16 Buccaneers would be allocated to 24 Squadron, to be based at WaterKloof Air Force Base, south of Pretoria, located 4.914 ft above sea level. It was because of this factor the installation of the rocket pack was deemed necessary by the SAAF. The runway at Waterkloof was long enough for the Buccaneer, even operating at maximum permitted weights, although it was considered that under certain conditions it might be necessary-as a safety precaution-to utilize the additional thrust; not just during take-off but also soon afterwards while trying to gain the necessary flying speeds in the climb. What must be remembered is the amount of effective thrust that was utilized by the bleeding of air for the BLC system on the Buccaneer. That all said, the success of the booster rockets will remain a matter for debate as they were removed from the aircraft during the fleet modification program in 1976. I will add a subsection here elaborating more on the modification program when more information is available.

 

 > Power and Dimensions

The S.50 was also equipped with strengthened undercarriage and higher capacity wheel brakes, and had manually folded wings.Due to the need to patrol the vast coastline, they also specified In-flight refueling and larger under-wing tanks.

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Description Specification
Two Rolls Royce RB. 168-1A Spey Mk 101 Turbofans 11 100 lb (5 035 kg) thrust.
Bristol BS. 605 twin chamber rocket engine (RATO) 8 000 lb (3 630 kg) thrust. Housed in retractable panels in lower part of rear fuselage just forward of air brakes.
Wingspan 44 ft (13,41 m)
Height 16 ft 3 in (4,95 m)
Length 63 ft 5 in (19,33 m) 6 inches shorter than a DC 3!
Empty Weight  29 980 lbs (13 599 kg)
Maximum take-off weight

62 000 lbs (28 123 kg)

> Fuselage and Structure 

The fuselage of the Buccaneer was designed using the area rule technique, which had the effect of reducing drag while travelling at high subsonic and transonic speeds, and gave rise to the characteristic curvy shape of the fuselage. The majority of the airframe and fuselage was machined from solid casting to give great strength to endure the stress of low level operations. Considerable effort went into ensuring that metal fatigue would not be a limiting factor of the Buccaneer's operational life even under the formidable conditions imposed of continuous low level flight.
A large air brake was built into the tail cone of the aircraft. The hydraulically operated air brake formed two leaves that could be opened into the airstream to quickly decelerate the aircraft. The style of air brake chosen by Blackburn was highly effective in the dive-attack profile that the Buccaneer was intended to perform, as well as effectively balancing out induced drag from operating the Boundary Layer Control (BLC system). It featured a variable incidence tail plane that could be trimmed to suit the particular requirements of low-speed handling or high-speed flight; the tail plane had to be high mounted due to the positioning and functionality of the Buccaneer's air brake.
The wing design of the Buccaneer was a compromise between two requirements: a low aspect ratio for gust response and high aspect ratio to give good range performance. The small wing was suited to high-speed flight at low altitude; however, a small wing did not generate sufficient lift that was essential for carrier operations. Therefore, BLC was used upon both the wing and horizontal stabilizer, having the effect of energizing and smoothing the boundary layer airflow, which significantly reduced airflow separation at the back of the wing, and therefore decreased stall speed, and increased effectiveness of trailing edge control surfaces including flaps and ailerons.

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Above: A cutaway of a Blackburn Buccaneer S.2 which is almost structurally identical to the S Mk.50 except for the exclusion of the Bristol Siddeley BS.605 rockets in the rear fuselage.

Spoiler

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Spoiler

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Boundary Layer Control (BLC)

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In order to dramatically improve aerodynamic performance at slow speeds, such as during take-off and landing, Blackburn adopted a new aerodynamic control technology, known as boundary layer control (BLC). BLC bled high pressure air directly from the engines, which was "blown" against various parts of the aircraft's wing surfaces. A full-span slit along the part of the wing's trailing edge was found to give almost 50% more lift than any contemporary scheme. In order to counteract the severe pitch movements that would otherwise be generated by use of BLC, a self- trimming system was interconnected with the BLC system and additional blowing of the wing's leading edge was also introduced. The use of BLC allowed the use of slats to be entirely discarded in the design.Before landing, the pilot would open the BLC vents as well as lower the flaps to achieve slow, stable flight. A consequence of the blown wing was that the engines were required to run at high power for low-speed flight in order to generate sufficient compressor gas for blowing. Blackburn's solution to this situation was the adoption of a large air brake; this also allowed an overshooting aircraft to pull away more quickly during a failed landing attempt. The nose cone and radar antenna could also be swung around by 180° to reduce the length of the aircraft in the carrier hangar. This feature was particularly important due to the small size of the aircraft carriers that the Buccaneer typically operated from.
The Buccaneer took off in 3,000 feet (914 m) at 144 knots (267 km/h; 166 mph) with blown air, the figures become 3,700 ft (1,128 m) at 175 knots (324 km/h; 201 mph) without blown air.
 

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> Performance Figures

 

Description

Specification

Operational Ceiling

40 000 ft

Design Speed

560 knots (645 mph or 1 038 km/h or Mach 0,85)

Maximum Speed (Clean Configuration)

580 knots (668 mph or 1 238 km/h or Mach 0.95

Basic Range (No IFR or extra tanks)

2 000 nautical miles (3 700 km)

Bomb Bay Tank

440 Imp Gallons (2 000 litres)

Under-wing Slipper Tank

430 Imp Gallons (1 955 litres)

 

 

 > Weapons

 

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As part of the initial contract, when the Mirage III aircraft arrived in South Africa in 1963, two air-to-air missile types were supplied for the intercept role and one air-to-surface missile type was supplied for the ground attack role. The forerunner of the AS-30 was the smaller AS-20, and a number of these were supplied with inert warheads to be used as training missiles. At that stage a single AS-30 missile cost R37 000-00 each and each pilot was only allowed to fire (and guide) one AS-20 per year and one AS-30 every two years. The AS-30 was also used in anger during the Bush War when in 1981, four out of five radar stations at Cahama in Southern Angola were knocked out by six Buccaneers firing twelve AS-30 missiles.

 

Description Specification
NORD AVIATION (Aerospaciale) AS-30 Role: Tactical Air-to-Surface Missile; Maximum range: 11 km; Length: 3,885 m; Wingspan: 1m; Launch Mass: 520 kg; Warhead: 230 kg General Purpose, or 213 kg Semi (Armour) Piercing
1000 lb Bomb Length: 2.3 m (7.55 ft) Explosives: 180 kg (396 lb) Torpex
68mm SNEB Rocket Length: 0.94 m (3.08 ft) Weight: 6.8 kg (15 lb) Explosives: HEAT; HE fragmentation; Marker; Training Slant Range: 1.6 km
Natak 165 mm recce flare
Condib (anti-runway bomb) Length: 1.58 m Weight: 70 kg Explosives: 43kg Typically released from an altitude of 300 ft. A couple of seconds later, the tail section separates allowing the deployment of the xxxx parachute, once opened this breaks the Condib's decent, steering it at a 60deg angle, with its nose pointed towards the ground. At that precise moment, a rocket which is attached to it, propels the bomb's warhead into its target (e.g. runway), penetrating and piercing through its concrete layer. After a 6 second delay, the warhead is detonated, creating a 5 m wide by 1.6 m deep hole in the runway, preventing its operational status
LOROP The Vinten Long-Range Oblique Photographic (LOROP) system was carried in the bomb bay of the Buccaneer. The 60 inch lens with a 5 inch film gave the ability to do reconnaissance photography at a safe standoff distance. The aircraft went in below the radar, pitched up and photographed the target and then got out of the area before counter-measures could be activated.
Mk 81 250 lb Bomb Length: 1.78 m (5.84 ft) Diameter: 23.0 cm (9.05 ft) Weight: 120 kg (265 lb) Explosives: 113 kg (250 lb)
Mk 82 500lb Bomb Length: 2.14 m (7.02 ft) Diameter: 27.3 cm (10.7 ft) Weight: 241 kg (531 lb) Explosives: 125 kg (275 lb) H-6 high-explosive

H2 Glide Bomb

Range: 60+ km (37+ miles) Length: 3.65 m (11.98 ft) Width: 3.7 m (12.1 ft) Diameter: 38 cm (14.9 ft) Weight: 980 kg (2,160 lb) Explosives: HE
ELT-555 (ACS) Electonic Warfare Pod (Bikini) The ELT-555 is a self-contained self protection ECM pod for fighter aircraft. Electrical power generation is ensured by a ram-air turbine located on the nose of the pod. Internal equipment include fore and aft facing antennas which receive pulsed and continuous wave signals and transmit pulsed responses, plus separate fore and aft facing continuous wave transmitter antennas on the under-surface. The system operates in H- to J-band (6 to 20 GHz) and is designed to operate in dense electromagnetic environments. It has multiple target contrast capability and features BITE.

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H2 Glide Bomb

> Various colour schemes during service

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Spoiler

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Buccaneer S.50 numner 417  (No. 24 Squadron, RAF Lossiemouth, United Kingdom, 1965) Pictured in the delivery colour scheme of gloss PRU blue undersides & gloss dark sea grey topsides, number 417 was one of eight aircraft flown to South Africa from RAF Lossiemouth in the UK. The aircraft suffered a double engine flame-out whilst over the mid-Atlantic, and the crew of Capt. CM Jooste and Lt. JJ de Klerk, were forced to eject. They were subsequently rescued by a passing freighter, after having spent some 13 hours in the water. The aircraft carries the under-wing 'slipper' fuel tanks which have a capacity of 1136 litres per tank.

 

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Buccaneer S.50-serial number 411, class B markings as 'G-2-1'(Hawker Siddeley Aviation Company, Home-on-Spalding Moor, United Kingdom, 1965) Prior to being accepted by 24 Squadron at RAF Lossiemouth

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Buccaneer S.50 number 416 (No. 24 Squadron, AFB Waterkloof, 1979).

 

 

> Retired from service 1991

In the rationalization process that followed South Africa's withdrawal form South West Africa and the latter's independence in 1990, it was announced that 24 Squadron operations would be discontinued in March 1991.On the 28 March, 24 Squadron flew its last official Buccaneer sortie in Squadron service and on the 30 June, the squadron was formally disbanded. The nature of its training and operations had taken its toll on aircraft numbers with only 5 remaining form the original order of 16.IN a tribute to an exceptional aircraft in both war and peace, it is fitting to note that all five survivors are preserved today in order to educate future generations of the part played by the incredible Buccaneer S.50 and it's crews-affectionately earning the nickname 'Easy Rider' among SAAF pilots in the process.

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References: 

Spoiler

 

Blackburn Buccaneer - Full Story:

 

ANGOLA The War : 

24 SQN Buccaneers NPC: https://24sqnbuccaneers.org/ 
SAAF, the unofficial webiste on the South African Air Force: http://www.saairforce.co.za/gallery-and-media/21/buccaneer/2

 

Image result for FROM FLEDGLING TO EAGLE Dick Lord

From Fledgling to Eagle: The South African Air Force During the Border War

 

Related image

[email protected] 8: SAAF'S BORDER WAR. THE SOUTH AFRICAN AIR FORCE IN COMBAT 1966-89

 

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Blackburn/BAE Buccanneer Owners' Workshop 

Authors Notes 

Spoiler

The Blackburn Buccaneer is a beautiful and fascinating aircraft. I love how unique it is and its legacy here in South Africa!

After the addition of top tier Jets in recent updates i now wonder whether high speed bombers and strike aircraft have a place in war thunder. Its no surprise that the Buccaneer has no offensive armament in the form of cannons, yet i believe it can excel in the role it does best, fast low level strike missions. The many different types of weaponry under the pylons and in the bomb bay could make it very effective in mixed battles? what do you guys think?


I love to make these detailed suggestions to share what I have learned with the war thunder community! It is a passion of mine to learn about military history and especially the history of my own country. I learn so much through war thunder and the research I do.
 This suggestion is the second 'SAAF  series' suggestions of mine (first one being: 
Hurricane Mk.IIC) I try to use these posts that I make to raise awareness about the history of the SAAF, it is a pity that the second oldest air force in the world doesn't get much spotlight. I plan to change that one post at a time :salute:

 

Edited by VexViper_Tiffs
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Open for discussion. :salute:

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I'd prefer to just see an ordinary Buccaneer in the British tree as a standard vehicle, but I would not be opposed to seeing this version as a premium, and if we get a standard Buccaneer, I think this should DEFINITELY be a skin for it.  +1.

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I will be adding a link to this suggestion on my daily Buccaneer post on WT Live to make people aware and to vote. Although i would prefer the Fleet Air Arm or RAF   version to be added at the end of the day a Buccaneer is a Buccaneer

 

:torpedo:

Edited by Lowjak
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I've just added my vote for this aircraft!

 

I would hope we would see an RAF/FAA version of this aircraft in the British Tech tree anyway, but will certainly add my support to a SAAF variant as well. Here's hoping, and fingers-crossed! 

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The problem with adding an identical premium that is only a reskin is that it causes a large amount of the player base to just buy the premium one, and the tech tree one is often not worth buying and playing, and so rots away. You see this with the Hunter FGA.9 vs the F.6 (or the now obsolete F.1), and the Israeli/French Vautours.  There are often few benefits of playing the tech tree aircraft other than posterity, since the premiums are often the same or slightly better, and come with repair costs equivalent to a Tier II and huge reward benefits.  For me, premiums should be aircraft that were low-production, or prototypes, or a one-off design by a satellite country that didn't really continue past that model.  Something special, something unique. 

 

The idea of reskinning a tech tree plane and selling it as a premium - especially within the same nation - feels like a cash grab, and a waste of time to put the tech tree one in in the first place, since few people will play the tech tree one without incentives.  It makes about as much sense as putting in a premium EE Lightning that's in Saudia Arabian colours, though there's potentially an argument there since the Saudi jets were uniquely modified to have ground attack munitions.  The South African Buccaneer is fundamentally the same, perhaps holding ordinance from other manufacturers rather than what the Royal Navy/RAF was using.

 

I would request that the Buccaneer be added as a tech tree aircraft under either the Scimitar or the Canberras (especially since its role was primarily strike with a high bomb load, and was compared to the A-6 Intruder), and that it have some 200 GE skins for the RAF/Royal Navy and the South African Air Force.  The RAF or RN could be an unlockable one with bomb delivery, and the SAAF could be a GE only skin.  I would much rather spend a few GE on a skin than see a plane sit in a tech tree unplayed because everyone is spamming a premium version they've shelled out upwards of $50-60 for.  Save premiums for more uncommon or unique things like the Avro Canada CF-100 Mk 3 or Mk 4, the CAC Sabre, or the Indian HAL HF-24 Marut.

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3 hours ago, IvoryJedi said:

The problem with adding an identical premium that is only a reskin is that it causes a large amount of the player base to just buy the premium one, and the tech tree one is often not worth buying and playing, and so rots away. You see this with the Hunter FGA.9 vs the F.6 (or the now obsolete F.1), and the Israeli/French Vautours.  There are often few benefits of playing the tech tree aircraft other than posterity, since the premiums are often the same or slightly better, and come with repair costs equivalent to a Tier II and huge reward benefits.  For me, premiums should be aircraft that were low-production, or prototypes, or a one-off design by a satellite country that didn't really continue past that model.  Something special, something unique. 

 

The idea of reskinning a tech tree plane and selling it as a premium - especially within the same nation - feels like a cash grab, and a waste of time to put the tech tree one in in the first place, since few people will play the tech tree one without incentives.  It makes about as much sense as putting in a premium EE Lightning that's in Saudia Arabian colours, though there's potentially an argument there since the Saudi jets were uniquely modified to have ground attack munitions.  The South African Buccaneer is fundamentally the same, perhaps holding ordinance from other manufacturers rather than what the Royal Navy/RAF was using.

 

I would request that the Buccaneer be added as a tech tree aircraft under either the Scimitar or the Canberras (especially since its role was primarily strike with a high bomb load, and was compared to the A-6 Intruder), and that it have some 200 GE skins for the RAF/Royal Navy and the South African Air Force.  The RAF or RN could be an unlockable one with bomb delivery, and the SAAF could be a GE only skin.  I would much rather spend a few GE on a skin than see a plane sit in a tech tree unplayed because everyone is spamming a premium version they've shelled out upwards of $50-60 for.  Save premiums for more uncommon or unique things like the Avro Canada CF-100 Mk 3 or Mk 4, the CAC Sabre, or the Indian HAL HF-24 Marut.

 

What you say is very true and i agree. This year i have a different stance on the aircraft being a premium. My old opinion on this aircraft as premium was solely because it is a unique variant that flew for a foreign nation ( at the time South African vehicles such as the Rooikat didn't exist in the game ). Now that the British tech tree has non premium foreign vehicles, i believe the the SAAF buccaneer can appear in the tree as a stand alone researchable variant or modification of an existing S2. 

6 hours ago, Lowjak said:

I will be adding a link to this suggestion on my daily Buccaneer post on WT Live to make people aware and to vote. Although i would prefer the Fleet Air Arm or RAF   version to be added at the end of the day a Buccaneer is a Buccaneer

 

:torpedo:

Thank you for your support! it is awesome to have someone passionate about the Buccaneer 

5 hours ago, fenris said:

I've just added my vote for this aircraft!

 

I would hope we would see an RAF/FAA version of this aircraft in the British Tech tree anyway, but will certainly add my support to a SAAF variant as well. Here's hoping, and fingers-crossed! 

Thanks for supporting , yes fingers crossed! :D

On 03/10/2019 at 20:32, Solarmod said:

South Africa needs some representation in game. +1

Couldn't agree more. thanks for ur support 

Edited by VexViper_Tiffs
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On 05/10/2019 at 06:40, Milocat said:

I'd prefer to just see an ordinary Buccaneer in the British tree as a standard vehicle, but I would not be opposed to seeing this version as a premium, and if we get a standard Buccaneer, I think this should DEFINITELY be a skin for it.  +1.

Thank you again for supporting :) 

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