Atlanta-class poll  

51 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you like to see an Atlanta-class light cruiser(s) represented as playable ships in WarThunder naval forces?

    • Yes!
      49
    • No!
      2
  2. 2. If you answered yes on the previous question, how many Atlanta-class cruisers would you like to see represented in the game?

    • Just one.
      32
    • Multiple (please elaborate in the comments).
      19
    • I answered "no" on the previous question.
      0
  3. 3. Do you agree with my choice of Atlanta-class cruiser, the USS San Diego?

    • Yes!
      48
    • No, I had another option in mind (please elaborate in the comments).
      3
  4. 4. What BR?

    • 5.0
      12
    • 5.3
      10
    • 5.7
      19
    • 6.0
      6
    • 6.3
      4
  5. 5. What armament preset should the USS San Diego get?

    • 1942 (standard armament)
      9
    • 1945 (retrofit armament)
      12
    • Both (one as an upgrade modification)
      30


Atlanta-class Light Cruisers

 

 Image result for printable american flag

 

Image result for atlanta ship

 

Introduction:

 

The Atlanta-class was a line of eight light cruisers built for the United States Navy during World War 2.  A development of the earlier St. Louis-class, the Atlanta-class ships were designed with the goal of creating an effective cruiser for scouting purposes, leading destroyer flotilla leaders, and increased anti-aircraft support.  Though they were smaller and less protected than many other light cruisers of the time, the Atlanta-class cruisers proved their worth in multiple battles throughout the war.

 

Development History:

 

I. Background:

Spoiler

Intended to serve as destroyer flotilla leaders, four Atlanta (CL-51) class light cruisers were authorized during the pre-World War II build-up program. Armed with eight dual 5-inch/38 gun turrets, they had the firepower of three destroyers. In operational use, they served as excellent anti-aircraft platforms, and the surviving ships were reclassified CLAA (anti-aircraft cruisers) in 1949.

 

This class was intended to replace the 1920s era Omaha class light cruisers. This class was developed to satisfy the need for a light displacement, high speed vessel whose mission was primarily combating large scale attack by aircraft, but which also possessed the ability to perform certain types of cruiser duty. Their initial purpose, contrary to popular belief, was not only that of an anti-aircraft cruiser but that of a small, fast scout cruiser that could operate in conjunction with destroyers on the fringes of the battle line in addition to the defense of the battle line against destroyer and aircraft attack. While they were not designed to "slug it out" with heaver ships, they were well suited to close surface action in bad weather (poor visibility) and to night actions, where their fast firing 5"/38's and eight 21" torpedos could be used to advantage.

 

In 1935, an experimental modernization was carried out by the Royal Navy on two British cruisers of WWI vintage, Coventry and Curlew. Their 6-inch main armament was removed and replaced by 4-inch antiaircraft weapons, "for use in the Mediterranean as AA escorts." The idea of a specialized AA ship gained surprising traction with the Admiralty (considering how little experience then existed to show how important AA defense was to a fleet). A new 5.25-inch dual purpose gun was being developed for the new King George V class battleships, and a new small cruiser was designed, the Dido class, to mount 5 twin turrets of these on some 6850 tons full load displacement.

 

These little ships had 62,000 SHP in a 4-screw power plant, good for 32-plus knots top speed and 4240 miles of range at 16 knots. They were adapted from a more conventional light cruiser design, the Arethusa class. Arethusas were successful as flotilla leaders. Didos were ordered in 1939 and 16 were produced; however, production of the ships outstripped production of the 5.25-inch guns, and some were commissioned with only 4 turrets while others had a turret removed later.

II. The Atlanta-Class (CL-51 - CL-54)

Spoiler

The American version of the antiaircraft cruiser is the Atlanta (CL 51) class. While its armament resembled the Dido's in photos with three twin turrets forward of the bridge, the actual layout was much different with a total of 8 dual purpose, 5inch/38 twin turrets. The propulsion plant was also much different with twin screw, 75,000 SHP for a similar top speed of 32.5 knots. Both ships were adequately armored – Atlanta had a 3.75-inch belt and 1.25-inch deck, with both being part of the hull girder; she was larger at 8340 tons full load.

 

As built the original main gun battery of the first quartet of Atlanta class was composed of eight dual 5-inch/38 caliber gun mounts (8 × 2 5-inch guns). This battery could fire over 17,600 pounds (8,000 kg) of shells per minute, including the radar-fuzed "VT" anti-aircraft (AA) shells. Fire control was by two Mk 37 fire control systems located on the centerline atop the superstructure. As built these lacked radar but in 1942 radar FD (Mk 4) was fitted. From 1943 this was replaced by the improved Mk 12/Mk 22 combination.

 

The first four had an original secondary anti-aircraft armament of twelve 1.1-inch (28 mm)/75 caliber guns in three quad mountings, initially without directors fitted. By early 1942 as more became available a fourth quad mount had been installed on the quarterdeck and directors were fitted (probably Mk 44). By late 1942 these troublesome and relatively ineffective weapons began to be replaced in the surviving ships by twin mountings for the new and far superior Bofors 40 mm anti-aircraft guns with Mk 51 directors.

 

Perhaps coincidentally, one of the intended functions of the CL 51 class was to replace aging Omaha class flotilla leaders for use in destroyer warfare. A flotilla leader protects destroyers against enemy surface and air attack while the destroyers carry out a torpedo attack against enemy capital ships. The type, sometimes called a destroyer leader, originated with HMS Swift in 1907. High speed is usual in flotilla leaders, and Atlanta was less outstanding than the Omaha's had been in this respect. However, her ability to protect against air attack was excellent. Unlike most US cruisers of the period she was equipped with torpedo tubes and depth charges, reflecting her destroyer-like mission. But, Atlantas were also intended as close screens for the battle line, protecting the capital ships against destroyer attack.

 

Also from early 1942 close-range AA armament was augmented by eight 20 mm rapid-fire anti-aircraft cannons in single Mk 4 mountings disposed two on the forward superstructure, 4 amidships between the funnels (displacing some of the ships boats) and 2 on the quarterdeck aft. From 1943 onward the number of these mounts increased by adding two more on the forward superstructure and a pair each side of the second funnel to counter the danger of Japanese air attacks (especially kamikazes). From the end of 1943, a quadruple 40 mm Bofors mounting replaced the twin mount on the quarterdeck, with the six depth charge projectors being removed as compensation. The additions of radar, additional close-range anti-aircraft guns and other equipment seriously impaired the stability of these ships as the war progressed and resulted in overcrowding as more ratings had to be added to man them.

 

The design consisted of many novel features, including the provision of an inner bottom extending to the second deck and following the contour of the outer shell. The side armor was of watertight reverted construction forming part of the watertight envelope of the hull. Armor protection was moderate, due to the weight limitation dictated by speed requirements, and consisted of side armor in way of the machinery spaces, bulkheads enclosing magazines, conning tower and steering engine room, with lighter protection on decks and on the boundaries off other vital areas.

 

The propelling machinery was of improved design based on experience gained in the operation of destroyer machinery. Manufactured by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, each set of turbines consisted of one cruising, one high pressure and one double flow low pressure. The cruising turbine connected to the forward end of the high-pressure turbine rotor shaft through a single reduction gear.  The ship was powered by four 665 psi boilers, connected to 2 geared steam turbines producing 75,000 horsepower (56,000 kW), and the ships could maintain a top speed of 33.6 knots (62.2 km/h; 38.7 mph). On trial the Atlanta made 33.67 knots (62.36 km/h; 38.75 mph) and 78,985 shp (58,899 kW). The ships of the Atlanta class had thin armor: a maximum of 3.5 inches (89 mm) on their sides, with the captain's bridge and the 5-inch gun mounts being protected by only 1.25 inches (32 mm).

 

In common with many other cruisers, the Atlantas were sometimes used for different functions from those for which they were designed. As a result, two of them were sunk by Japanese cruisers and destroyers while formed up in a battle line of larger US cruisers on 13 November, 1942. The class was most successful as part of the AAW screen around fast carriers, foreshadowing the function of later DL and DLG designs.

 

The Atlanta-class cruisers were the only class of U.S. Navy cruisers commissioned during World War II to be armed with torpedo tubes, with eight 21-inch (533 mm) torpedo tubes in two quad launchers.

 

The ships were originally designed for 26 officers and 523 men, but this increased to 35 officers and 638 men with the first four ships, and 45 officers and 766 men with the second group of four ships beginning with Oakland. The ships were also designed as flagships with additional space for a flag officer and his staff but the additional space was used for additional crew necessary to man anti-aircraft weapons and electronics.

 

During World War II a modification was ordered in which the torpedo tubes and two 5-inch turrets would be replaced by 5 quad and 4 twin 40mm AA guns but this was never completed.

 

Although very formidable as anti-aircraft ships, the Atlanta-class cruisers did not fare well in surface combat. The only two cruisers of the class that engaged in surface combat were sunk: Atlanta and Juneau. The U.S. Navy lost three light cruisers during World War II, two of which were Atlantas. Both were sunk in surface combat during the Guadalcanal Campaign. Both of these vessels received their fatal blows from Japanese torpedoes, and gunfire from larger, more heavily armed ships. The unique armament of the Atlanta class did not contribute to their loss.

 

The Atlanta-class design was also criticized for its shortage of gunfire directors for the main 5-inch gun battery, which reduced its effectiveness. Initially there were not enough intermediate anti-aircraft guns (i.e. 1.1 in guns, Bofors 40 mm and the Oerlikon 20 mm rapid-fire cannons). These problems were somewhat corrected in naval shipyards by the end of 1942, but the Atlanta-class warships were thereafter overloaded with weight, compared to the size of their hulls, and throughout World War II and the postwar years, they had problems with topside weight which was addressed by a redesign of the third repeat order which was called the Juneau-class cruiser.

 

CL-51 and 52 were assigned to Federal Shipbuilding, Kearny NJ. These were laid down Apr-May 1940 and commissioned Dec 1941 and Feb 1942, respectively. Atlanta (CL-51) and Juneau (CL-52) were sunk in a naval battle off Guadalcanal 13 Nov 1942.

 

CL-53 and 54 were assigned to Bethlehem Shipbuilding, Quincy MA. Laid down in March and May 1940, these joined the fleet Jan-Feb 1942 - both survived the war to decommission in late 1946 and were scrapped 1960-62.

III. The Oakland-Class Derivative (CL-95 - CL-98)

Spoiler

The second group, sometimes known as the Oakland class was commissioned with only six twin 5-inch/38 mounts and with Bofors guns from the start, with four additional twin Bofors 40 mm mounts compared to their predecessors: 2 displacing the former 5-inch/38 wing turrets (improving both stability and close-range AA firepower while easing congestion) and two between the funnels displacing the previous two pairs of 20 mm Oerlikons. In addition the battery of 20 mm anti-aircraft cannons was increased with a pair on the bow, 4 on the forward superstructure, 8 amidships arrayed either side of the aft funnel and 2 on the quarterdeck aft for a total of 16.

 

By the end of the war USS Oakland had been given an anti-kamikaze upgrade which included replacing the 4 aft twin Bofors with quad mountings and greatly reducing the number of 20 mm mounts (possibly as few as 6) while replacing those that remained with twin rather than single guns. Torpedo tubes were removed.

 

Although ships of the class were planned as destroyer flotilla leaders, the original design did not include anti-submarine armament such as sonar or a depth charge battery. In early 1942 along with anti-aircraft and radar upgrades these ships were fitted with sonar and the standard destroyer battery of 6 depth charge projectors and 2 stern mounted tracks. When the vessels were determined to be more valuable as protection against aircraft, the projectors were removed but the tracks were retained. The Oakland sub-class never received the projectors, getting only two stern tracks, probably due to marginal stability.

IV. Post War

Spoiler

After the end of the war, all the remaining Atlanta and Oakland-class cruisers were quickly decommissioned, largely due to the number of problems that had occurred with them throughout the war.  Within twenty years, all of them were struck and sold for scrap.

 

Three follow-on ships (Juneau Class) were commissioned in 1946 and were distinguished from the Atlanta Class by a reduction of the superstructure height by one level, a reduction in the distance between the stacks, and a substantial increase in the antiaircraft batteries. This class had an array of various types of radar antennae installed on the fore and main masts.

 

List of Atlanta-class Light Cruisers

 

Atlanta Class Service History Battle Stars
Ship
Name
Commissioned
Decommissioned
Re-Commissioned
Re-Decommissioned
Days
WWII
Korea
Vietnam
Total
CL-51
Atlanta
12/24/1941
Sunk
-
-
1698
5
-
-
5
CL-52
Juneau
2/14/1942
Sunk
-
-
1585
4
-
-
4
CL-53
San Diego
1/10/1942
11/4/1946
-
-
1598
18
-
-
18
CL-54
San Juan
2/28/1942
11/9/1946
-
-
1576
13
-
-
13

 

 

cl-51-line.gif

 

In WarThunder:

I'd like to suggest that at least one Atlanta-class light cruiser be added to the ranks of the United States naval forces tree.  After careful consideration of the options at hand and the current era of WarThunder's naval forces, I've decided that the best option would be the third ship of this class and the most U.S. light cruiser of World War 2, the USS San Diego (CL-53).

 

USS San Diego (CL-53)

 

Image result for uss san diego (cl-53)

 

Overview:

 

The U.S.S. San Diego (CL-53) was the second U.S. Navy ship to bear the California city's name. The Atlanta-class light antiaircraft cruiser, commissioned in 1942, played a part in almost every major Pacific campaign during World War II. Although it was attacked on numerous occasions, the San Diego never lost a man in combat or suffered any major damage. During its lifetime, the ship participated in 34 major battles, earned 18 battle stars, more than any other United States ship except for the famous USS Enterprise (CV-6), and traveled 300,000 miles.

 

On August 28, 1945, it earned the distinction of being among the first major Allied warships to enter Tokyo Bay since the beginning of the war. The San Diego was decommissioned in November 1946 and placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet in Bremerton, Washington. It was re-designated CLAA-53 in 1949, was struck from the Naval Vessel Register 10 years later, and was scrapped in Seattle in 1960.

 

Service History:

Spoiler

San Diego was laid down on 27 March 1940 by Bethlehem Steel in Quincy, Massachusetts, launched on 26 July 1941, and acquired by the Navy and commissioned on 10 January 1942.

 

After shakedown training in Chesapeake Bay, San Diego sailed via the Panama Canal to the west coast, arriving at her namesake city on 16 May 1942. Escorting Saratoga at best speed, San Diego barely missed the Battle of Midway. On 15 June, she began escort duty for Hornet in operations in the South Pacific. Early in August, she supported the first American offensive of the war, the invasion of the Solomons at Guadalcanal. With powerful air and naval forces, the Japanese fiercely contested the American thrust and inflicted heavy damage; San Diego witnessed the sinking of Wasp on 15 September and of Hornet on 26 October.

 

San Diego gave antiaircraft protection for Enterprise as part of the decisive three-day Naval Battle of Guadalcanal from 12–15 November 1942. After several months of service in the dangerous waters surrounding the Solomon Islands, San Diego sailed via Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, to Auckland New Zealand, for replenishment.

 

At Noumea, New Caledonia, the light cruiser joined Saratoga, the only American carrier available in the South Pacific, and HMS Victorious in support of the invasion of Munda, New Georgia, and of Bougainville. On 5 November and 11 November 1943, she joined Saratoga and Princeton in highly successful raids against Rabaul. San Diego served as part of Operation Galvanic, the capture of Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. She escorted Lexington, damaged by a torpedo, to Pearl Harbor for repairs on 9 December. San Diego continued on to San Francisco for installation of modern radar equipment, a Combat Information Center and 40 mm antiaircraft guns to replace her obsolete 1.1 in (27 mm) batteries.

 

In 1944, she joined Vice Admiral Marc Mitscher's Fast Carrier Task Force at Pearl Harbor in January 1944 and served as an important part of that mighty force for the remainder of the war. Her rapid-fire guns protected the carriers against aerial attack. San Diego participated in "Operation Flintlock", the capture of Majuro and Kwajalein, and "Catchpole", the invasion of Eniwetok, in the Marshall Islands from 31 January to 4 March. During this period, Task Force 58 (TF 58) delivered a devastating attack against Truk, the Japanese naval base known as the "Gibraltar of the Pacific."

 

San Diego steamed back to San Francisco for more additions to her radar and then rejoined the carrier force at Majuro in time to join in raids against Wake and Marcus Islands in June. She was part of the carrier force covering the invasion of Saipan, participated in strikes against the Bonin Islands, and shared in the victory of the First Battle of the Philippine Sea on 19–20 June. After a brief replenishment stop at Eniwetok, San Diego and her carriers supported the invasion of Guam and Tinian, struck at Palau, and conducted the first carrier raids against the Philippines. On 6 and 8 August, she stood by as the carriers gave close air support to Marines landing on Peleliu, Palau Islands.

 

On 21 September, the Task Force struck at the Manila Bay area. After replenishing at Saipan and Ulithi, she sailed with TF 38 in its first strike against Okinawa. From 12–15 October, the carriers pounded the airfields of Formosa while San Diego's guns shot down two of the nine Japanese attackers in her sector and drove the others away; however, some enemy planes got through and damaged Houston and Canberra. San Diego helped escort the two crippled cruisers out of danger to Ulithi. After rejoining the fast carrier force, she successfully rode out the typhoon of 17–18 December, despite heavy rolling of the ship.

 

In January 1945, TF 38 entered the South China Sea for attacks against Formosa, Luzon, Indochina, and southern China. The force struck Okinawa before returning to Ulithi for replenishment.

 

San Diego next participated in carrier operations against the home islands of Japan, the first since the Doolittle Raid of 1942. The carrier force finished the month of February with strikes against Iwo Jima.

 

On 1 March, San Diego and other cruisers were detached from the carrier force to bombard Okino Daijo Island in support of the landings on Okinawa. After another visit to Ulithi, she joined in carrier strikes against Kyūshū, again shooting down or driving away enemy planes attacking the carriers. On the night of 27–28 March, San Diego participated in the shelling of Minami Daito Jima; on 11 April, and again on 16 April, her guns shot down two attackers. She helped furnish anti-aircraft protection for ships damaged by suicide attacks and escorted them to safety. After a stop at Ulithi, she continued as part of the carrier force supporting the invasion of Okinawa, until she entered an advanced base drydock at Guiuan, Samar Island, Philippines, for repairs and maintenance.


She then served once more with the carrier force operating off the coast of Japan from 10 July until hostilities ceased. On 27 August, San Diego was the first major Allied warship to enter Tokyo Bay since the beginning of the war, and she helped in the occupation of the Yokosuka Naval Base and the surrender of the Japanese battleship Nagato. After having steamed over 300,000 mi (480,000 km) in the Pacific, she returned to San Francisco on 14 September 1945. San Diego gave further service as part of "Operation Magic Carpet" in bringing American troops home.

 

San Diego was then decommissioned and placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet on 4 November 1946, berthed at Bremerton, Washington. She was redesignated CLAA-53 on 18 March 1949. 10 years later, she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register, on 1 March 1959, and sold in December 1960 to Todd Shipyards, Seattle, WA.

 

During the war, USS San Diego (CL-53) received 18 Battle Stars for service in World War II, placing her among the Most decorated US ships of World War II.

 

Following is a list of the campaigns participated in:

  • Guadalcanal Capture
  • Buin-Faisi-Tonolai Raid
  • Santa Cruz Islands
  • Guadalcanal (Third Savo)
  • Rennel Island Jan.
  • New Georgia-Rendova-Vaugunu
  • Buka-Bonins Strike
  • Gilbert Islands Occupation
  • Kwajelein-Wotje
  • Truk Attack, February 16–17, 1944
  • Saipan-Pagan Attacks
  • Southern Palau Islands
  • Southern Palau Islands, Philippine Islands Assaults
  • Okinawa Attack
  • Formosa Attacks
  • China Coast Attacks
  • Iwo Jima, Feb. 15 To March 16, 1945
  • Okinawa Assault And Occupation March, 17 To June 11, 1945
  • Philippine Liberation

 

 

Specifications:

 

Name: USS San Diego

Namesake: City of San Diego, California

Ordered: 1938

Builder: Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation's Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts

Laid down: March 27th, 1940

Launched: July 26th, 1941

Commissioned: January 10th, 1942

Decommissioned: November 4th, 1946

Struck: March 1st, 1959

Identification: 

  • Hull Symbol: CL-53
  • Code letters: NCDF

Honors and awards: 18 x battle stars

Fate: Sold for scrap, December 1960

 

Class and type: Atlanta-class Light Cruiser

Displacement:  

  • 6,718 long tons (6,826 t) (standard)
  • 8,340 long tons (8,470 t) (max)

Length: 

  • 541 ft 6 in (165.05 m) oa

Beam: 53 ft (16 m)

Draft: 

  • 20 ft 6 in (6.25 m) (mean) 
  • 26 ft (8.08 m) (max)

Installed power:  4 ×  Steam boilers, 75,000 shp (56,000 kW)

Propulsion: 

  • 2 × geared turbines
  • 2 × screws

Speed: 32.5 kn (37.4 mph; 60.2 km/h)

Range: 11,000 nmi (20,000 km) at 15 kn (17 mph; 28 km/h)

Compliment: 796 officers and enlisted

Armament:

  • 1942:
    • 16 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 caliber Mark 12 guns (8×2)
    • 16 × 1.1 in (28 mm)/75 anti-aircraft guns (4×4)
    • 8 × single 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannons
    • 8 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
    • 6 × depth charge projectors
    • 2 × depth charge tracks
  • 1945:
    • 16 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 caliber Mark 12 guns (8×2)
    • 4 × quad 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors anti-aircraft guns
    • 13 × 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannons
    • 8 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
    • 6 × depth charge projectors
    • 2 × depth charge tracks

Armor:

  • Belt: 1.1–3 3⁄4 in (28–95 mm)
  • Deck: 1 1⁄4 in (32 mm)
  • Turrets: 1 1⁄4 in (32 mm)
  • Conning Tower: 2 1⁄2 in (64 mm)

Aircraft carried: None

 

More Images/Videos:

Spoiler

1024px-Launching_of_USS_San_Diego_%28CL-

 

Image result for uss san diego (cl-53)

 

Image result for uss san diego (cl-53)

 

Image result for uss san diego (cl-53)

 

 

 

 

In summary, I believe that the Atlanta-class light cruiser would make an excellent addition to the United States naval lineup, and that the USS San Diego would be a fine representative of this decorated cruiser class, fitting the current meta of naval forces very well.

 

Sources:

Primary:

Secondary:

 

 

Thank you all for your time, and I hope you'll consider this suggestion!

 

Edited by RogueStarflyer
  • Upvote 2
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Open for Discussion.:salute:

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The Atlanta class were gorgeous ships.  +1

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+1 to bringing the Church of the Multiple Gun mounts God to WT.

 

Although as fun as it will be, its implimentation will be very touchy given how many 127s and 20mm, 28mm and 40mm guns it would have, not to mention its 127s being Dual Purpose, its basicly 2 Sumner DDs in one hull, and if its prem, its going to start the usual P2W outcrys

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10 hours ago, SAUBER_KH7 said:

Open for Discussion.:salute:

 

Thank you, sir!

 

9 hours ago, daTungsten said:

Although as fun as it will be, its implementation will be very touchy given how many 127s and 20mm, 28mm and 40mm guns it would have, not to mention its 127s being Dual Purpose, its basically 2 Sumner DDs in one hull, and if its prem, its going to start the usual P2W outcrys

 

The Atlanta will definitely have to come into the game along with counterparts from the other nations' navies.  As of right now, there are no top tier premiums, and since light cruisers are currently top tier, I doubt that it would be premium.

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This is one of my favourite us navy ships of ww2 I would definitely love to see her in game. no aircraft would get near her. +1

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On 27/10/2018 at 10:24, RogueStarflyer said:

The Atlanta will definitely have to come into the game along with counterparts from the other nations' navies.  As of right now, there are no top tier premiums, and since light cruisers are currently top tier, I doubt that it would be premium.

Do you mean higher tier DDs and CLs or other CL-AAs?

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1 hour ago, WulfPack said:

Do you mean higher tier DDs and CLs or other CL-AAs?

 

I meant higher tier CLs for other nations.

 

The U.S. light cruiser line atm is in a bit of a predicament.  As compared to the other light cruisers in the game, the Omaha is a bit mediocre.  That's not the problem, though.  The problem is that any other WW2 era U.S. cruiser would completely break the current in-game balance.  The next logical step up from the Omaha would be the Brooklyn-class, which would club everything with its fifteen 5' guns.  You can add some pre-war U.S. cruisers in, but they would essentially be either on par or worse than the Omaha.

 

So, the other nations need to get some better light cruisers in order for the U.S. to get light cruisers like the Atlanta class, the Brooklyn-class, and the Cleveland-class.

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8 hours ago, RogueStarflyer said:

So, the other nations need to get some better light cruisers in order for the U.S. to get light cruisers like the Atlanta class, the Brooklyn-class, and the Cleveland-class.

Definitely 

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If I hadnt played much i'd say no, just because of how many 127mm guns it has.

But when debating if I should reaserch the Sumner or the US CL in game i tested them out. And the 150mm on the current CL vastly out preform 127mm fordamage and accuracy.

Seeing as the Atlanta is a CL and would thus spawn with the other CLs her overwhelming number of 127mm guns would be balanced by the ranges she'd start at and the lack of damage per shell compared to other CLs.

 

She'd suffer from afar but soon prove to be one of the deadliest ships about when she gets close or amongst the islands.

 

So 

+1 from me, i think she'd balance quite well as a CL. 

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All of the yes from me. 2.66 Sumners would be an excellent ship to have. With regards to which version we should have, the San Diego is certainly an excellent pick. Perhaps a folder of three ships, the Atlanta as built, San Diego from the refit, then Oakland as the last one. They'd all pretty much fit in the same BR, and as they're basically all the same ship, it would be easy enough to do. Thoughts?

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On ‎16‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 10:58, sergeanthop said:

All of the yes from me. 2.66 Sumners would be an excellent ship to have. With regards to which version we should have, the San Diego is certainly an excellent pick. Perhaps a folder of three ships, the Atlanta as built, San Diego from the refit, then Oakland as the last one. They'd all pretty much fit in the same BR, and as they're basically all the same ship, it would be easy enough to do. Thoughts?

I have to say I like the idea of putting them in a folder, although what about implementing Atlanta as built as a Premium and instead of having an as built in the folder, start off with the Refit, then go to Oakland, and have the final ship in the folder being the post war Juneau?

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3 minutes ago, jon_man1199 said:

I have to say I like the idea of putting them in a folder, although what about implementing Atlanta as built as a Premium and instead of having an as built in the folder, start off with the Refit, then go to Oakland, and have the final ship in the folder being the post war Juneau?

 

There's really all sorts of ways this could be done. The main reason I included San Diego was because of her history. Unless you meant San Diego instead of Juneau, because there is no post-war Juneau.

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3 minutes ago, sergeanthop said:

 

There's really all sorts of ways this could be done. The main reason I included San Diego was because of her history. Unless you meant San Diego instead of Juneau, because there is no post-war Juneau.

This is what I mean by Post War Juneau, as in CL-119 

As built she was armed with

12 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 caliber Mark 12 guns (6×2)

6 × quad 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors

6 × dual 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors

8 × dual 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon

But she received a Refit that substantially changed her armament in the early 50s 

12 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 caliber Mark 12 guns (6×2)

7 × twin 3 in (76 mm)/50 caliber Mark 22 anti-aircraft guns

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On 25/11/2018 at 10:07, jon_man1199 said:

This is what I mean by Post War Juneau, as in CL-119 

As built she was armed with

12 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 caliber Mark 12 guns (6×2)

6 × quad 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors

6 × dual 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors

8 × dual 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon

But she received a Refit that substantially changed her armament in the early 50s 

12 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 caliber Mark 12 guns (6×2)

7 × twin 3 in (76 mm)/50 caliber Mark 22 anti-aircraft guns

 

Yeah, but that's not reaaally and Atlanta. It's similar, based off of, but quite a bit different in a number of aspects. Either way, it would be a lot of fun.

Edited by sergeanthop
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3 hours ago, sergeanthop said:

 

Yeah, but that's not reaaally and Atlanta. It's similar, based off of, but quite a bit different in a number of aspects. Either way, it would be a lot of fun.

Indeed, Juneau is more of a Cousin I suppose 

Edited by jon_man1199
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43 minutes ago, jon_man1199 said:

Indeed, Juneau is more of a Cousin I suppose 

 

I'd think it would be the next one up in the tech tree from the Atlantas. Improved, more survivable, better AA suite. 

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