joshwagstaff13

Aermacchi MB-339CB - Trainer and light attack aircraft for a land down under

MB-339CB  

13 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you want this added

    • Yes
      12
    • No
      0
    • Uncertain
      1
  2. 2. What BR should it go at?

    • 7.7
      5
    • 8.0
      4
    • 8.3
      2
    • 8.7
      1
    • Other (please specify)
      1
    • I don't want it
      0
  3. 3. Where should it go?

    • UK Tree (Premium/Gift/Event)
      4
    • UK Tree (Light Bomber/Attacker line)
      5
    • Other (please specify)
      4
    • I already said no twice
      0


Before anyone says anything: yes, the MB-339C was passed to development not that long ago. However, that was the MB-339CD, a later development of the MB-339C for Italy that incorporated a glass cockpit and the lower-powered engine from the MB-339A/PAN. This is an earlier version, which only served with the RNZAF, with different capabilities and improved performance compared to the MB-339CD.

 

Overview

 

The Aermacchi MB-339CB is an Italian-made trainer aircraft that first flew in 1985. Designed to mount a variety of weapons in order to meet all training requirements, this also gave it a light attack capability. Deliveries of this aircraft began in 1991 to the sole air arm to operate the MB-339CB, the Royal New Zealand Air Force, where it replaced the BAC Strikemaster Mk.88 in the lead-in jet trainer role. Operationally, the aircraft was used to train pilots moving on to the A-4K Kahu - A-4 Skyhawk aircraft upgraded to have the warfighting capability of an F-16. The MB-339CB was retired from service in 2001, along with the A-4K and TA-4K Kahu.

 

dBvLLPn.jpg

 

History

The MB-339C first flew in 1985, but in several years received no orders. Ultimately, it was the RNZAF that ordered the first MB-339C aircraft, in the form of the MB-339CB, in 1990. Intended to replace the ageing Strikemaster aircraft, the MB-339CB were fitted with weapons systems that gave them full compatibility with the modernised A-4K already in RNZAF service; these systems included:

  • Air-to-air HUD modes for both guns (with lead calculation) and missiles
  • Electro-Optical TV compatibility to enable the aircraft to fire the AGM-65B/D used with RNZAF A-4K aircraft
  • RADAR detection systems for aerial rangefinding, used in conjunction with the A2A HUD modes
  • CCIP bombing computation systems to be used with the Mk 82 500 lb bomb

 

In December 2001, the RNZAF Air Combat Force was disbanded, with No 2 (A-4K), 14 (339CB), and 75 (A-4K) squadrons disbanded, and their aircraft retired from service and placed in storage. In 2012, 8 of the 17 remaining MB-339CB aircraft were donated to museums around New Zealand, with the other nine being sold to Draken International.

 

Only one MB-339CB was lost in RNZAF service - NZ6465, which ditched near Kaitaia in 1993 following an engine failure. Both crew ejected and survived.

 

gnxcqlf.jpg

 

Specifications

 

Wingspan - 11.220 m

Length - 11.242 m

Height - 3.994 m

Crew - 2

Basic Mass - 3430 kg

Maximum Take-Off Mass - 6150 kg

Fuel Load - 1395 kg max (1781 liters)

Powerplant - 1x Rolls Royce Viper 680-43 Turbojet, 1941 kgf of thrust under ISA conditions at sea level (19.05 kN, 4280 lbf)

 

Max Speed - 500 KCAS (Mach 0.82) at 20,000 ft, clean

Stall Speed - 80 KCAS (148 km/h), clean, full flaps

Rate of Climb - 37 m/s (7283 ft/min)

Service Ceiling - 49,200 ft (14,996 m)

Range - 1170 km

 

Armament

5416916916_8689dca5d0_b.jpg
 

Spoiler

 

Up to 2720 kg (fuel dependent) of stores, comprising:

2x AN/M3 12.7mm Gunpods

or

6x LAU-5002 B/A rocket pods (6x 70mm CRV7 rockets/pod)

or

6x LAU-32 rocket pods (7x 70mm CRV7 rockets/pod)

or

6x LAU-51 rocket pods (19x 70mm CRV7 rockets/pod

or

Any combination of the above (symmetrical loading only)

 

Note: the above weapons are those cleared by the RNZAF to use with the MB-339CB. Other compatible weapons used by the RNZAF at the same time include:

6x Mk 82 LDGP Bombs

6x Mk 82 Snake Eye HDGP Bombs

6x LAU-10B/A rocket pods (4x 127mm Zuni rockets/pod)

2x AIM-9L Siderwinder air-to-air missiles

6x AGM-65B/D Maverick air-surface missiles

 

A full list of weapons compatible with the MB-339CB are shown below, taken from the flight manual:

kIcJrAP.jpg

nrHCwUE.jpg

 

 

 

Sources

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/mb339.html

http://www.avialogs.com/index.php/en/aircraft/italy/aermacchi/mb339/2249todo.html < Flight Manual specific to the MB-339CB, PI 1T-MB339C-1/NZAP 6212.006-1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aermacchi_MB-339

 

  • Upvote 1
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Open for discussion. :salute:

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If I'm understanding this correctly, this is basically the MB-339C but re-designated to MB-339CB for the New Zealand Air Force.

 

If that's the case, the plane itself was already passed to the devs for consideration

 

 

 

Edited by EpicBlitzkrieg87
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1 hour ago, EpicBlitzkrieg87 said:

this is basically the MB-339C but re-designated to MB-339CB for the New Zealand Air Force.

Yes and no.

 

As the CB was the earliest of the C-based variants produced - in fact, the RNZAF was the first customer for the basic MB-339C airframe - the capabilities when compared to later ones are different. For example, as the CB had to be compatible with the T/A-4K in RNZAF service, it had a small MFD screen with the ability to display the feed from the seeker head on the EO-guided AGM-65 (which it was never cleared to fire in RNZAF service), which is a capability the later, full-digital version likely lacks.

 

Additionally, the one you suggested was the later (1996 bs 1991) C-based variant for Italy, the MB-339CD, which features a full-digital, all-glass cockpit in comparison to the mostly analog cockpit on the MB-339CB. Other differences include the more powerful Viper 680-43 engine in the CB (the CD uses the less powerful 4,000 lbf Viper 632-43, which was also used in the MB-339A/PAN), which would result in better flight performance when compared to the CD. Additionally, the CD has added drag courtesy of the non-retractable refuelling probe on the right forward fuselage, while the CB is a cleaner airframe, aerodynamically speaking, which lacks IFR capabilities.

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On 24/09/2018 at 17:14, joshwagstaff13 said:

Yes and no.

 

As the CB was the earliest of the C-based variants produced - in fact, the RNZAF was the first customer for the basic MB-339C airframe - the capabilities when compared to later ones are different. For example, as the CB had to be compatible with the T/A-4K in RNZAF service, it had a small MFD screen with the ability to display the feed from the seeker head on the EO-guided AGM-65 (which it was never cleared to fire in RNZAF service), which is a capability the later, full-digital version likely lacks.

 

Additionally, the one you suggested was the later (1996 bs 1991) C-based variant for Italy, the MB-339CD, which features a full-digital, all-glass cockpit in comparison to the mostly analog cockpit on the MB-339CB. Other differences include the more powerful Viper 680-43 engine in the CB (the CD uses the less powerful 4,000 lbf Viper 632-43, which was also used in the MB-339A/PAN), which would result in better flight performance when compared to the CD. Additionally, the CD has added drag courtesy of the non-retractable refuelling probe on the right forward fuselage, while the CB is a cleaner airframe, aerodynamically speaking, which lacks IFR capabilities.

 

Interesting. What are the chances of a New Zealand tech tree though? I see no place for it in the game right now

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i vote yes, but for the time being for balance reasons not includes sidewinders, and not AGM65 mavericks.

 

 

Mavericks are fire and forget missile, requiring only acquisition by the pilot before launch.   This would allow it to kill tanks  outside of the ground forces battlefield  Given the fire and forget nature this would allow a pilot to egress and not wait until impact, or take the time to acquire and shoot another ground target.

Edited by kev2go
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