Lord_Waka

NC.223.4 "Jules Verne" : The Shoedropper (First over Berlin)

Your opinion on the NC.223.4 "Jules Verne"  

107 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you support the addition of the Jules Verne ingame ?

    • Yes.
      102
    • No.
      3
    • Undecided.
      2
  2. 2. What status would you like the Jules Verne to have ?

    • Regular Aircraft
      32
    • Premium Aircraft
      46
    • Rare Aircraft
      23
    • I answered no to the first question
      3
    • Undecided
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With the recent addition of the French Tech Tree, we saw the introduction of two models of Farman bombers - the F.222.2 and the NC.223.3. Those two are enjoyable Low tiers bombers; But I think there is at least a third one that should be added: The NC.223.4 

 

I. A mail plane that went to war

 

The NC.223.4 was directly based on the NC.223.3 we have ingame. It was a mail plane derivate ordered by Air France, the national french airline and mail plane company. In order to fullfill it's role, the NC.223.3 had to undertake a number of modifications.

 

First, pretty obviously, the bomb bay and defensive armament were removed, to make place for a storage area. The fuel tanks were moved; originally in the wings, they were moved to the iower fuselage. There were 12 tanks, with a total capacity of 14,000 litres of fuel. The nose and it's shape was heavily modified, with a less-squared shape; it was lighter. The two vertical stabilizers were largened and put further from each other. 

 

The original 12Y-29 920hp engines were replaced by the newest model of 12Y, the 12Y-37, which developped 960hp each. Their optimal altitude, however, was closer to the ground than the one of the 12Y-29; 1,250 meters instead of 3,600. On the other hand, the aircraft were optimized for high-altitude flight; they were given a pressurized cabin (but this did not apply to the storage areas) allowing flgihts over 9,000 meters.

 

-7pX2X0D

Profile differences between the NC.223.3 and NC.223.4; as far as I know, it's the same scale.

 

Three NC.223.4 were ordered by Air France (there were not any real "prototype", as all three would serve in the company). Each one was given a designation and a nickname: The first one, which flew on the 15th of March 1939, was designated "F-AJQM" and nicknamed "Camille Flammarion". The second (and hero of this story) was designated "F-ARIN" and nicknamed "Jules Verne". The last was designated "F-AROA" and nicknamed "Le Verrier".

 

nc223-9.jpg

The Jules Verne, with it's markings & earth emblem.

 

In September of 1939, as World War Two broke out, the three NC.223.4 were seized by the french government. The army did not want them, but the Navy took them in, as their long range could be an useful element when patrolling the Atlantic. The Jules Verne was put under the command of a 38-years old officer, the Corvette Captain Henri Laurent Daillière; Daillière was already quite famous for having performed the world record of range crossed by a seaplane, in June of 1935, crossing 4,347km from Cherbourg (Normandy) to Ziguinchor (Senegal). He was a charismatic and andacious man, with a good knowledge of aviation and it's capacities. 

 

The Jules Verne was used as a patrol plane untill the 6th of May 1940; at this date, a conversion proccess was started, with the objective to turn the Jules Verne into a bomber. Height hardpoints were added on the wings, each able to house a 250kg bomb; giving a respectable bombload of 2,000kg to the Farman. A 7.5mm machine-gun (as far as I know it was a Darne mle 1933) was added on the right-side lateral door. A bomber position was added in the nose, aswell as a navigator position. Additional fuel tanks (4,000 liters) were added, and, finally, the iow fuselage and wings were painted in a black color, to make the aircraft hard to detect in the night.The Jules Verne was based in Lanvéoc, Brittany.

 

Berlin_Le-Jules-Verne-va-pa.jpg

The Jules Verne, eitheir in Lanvéoc or Bordeaux-Mérignac

 

 

In the night of the 13th to the 14th of May, as the first signs of a disaster were noticed in Sedan, the Jules Verne started it's first mission, bombing the railroad centers of Aachen and Maastricht, in an attempt to reduce the mobility of German troops. In the following days, as German forces steamrolled through the Netherlands, the Jules Verne would continue to attack infrastructures at places such as Flessingue or Middleburg.

 

On the 6th of June 1940, the Farman changed airfield, for Bordeaux-Mérignac, and performed it's first mission deep into German territory - Bypassing German air defence by flying over the North Sea and Baltic, the Jules Verne bombed Rostock coming straight from the North. This attack angle was unexpected by the German air defence, and the Jules Vernes suffered no damage. This successfull operation conviced Daillière that a bombing operation over Berlin, just South of Rostock, was possible. 

 

Berlin_equipage-du-Jules.jpg

The Jules Verne's crew

 

The idea of an attack over Berlin was a retaliation for operation "Paula": A German bombing operation against military target aside and in Paris. But bombing Paris as the germans was way easier than bombing Berlin as the French; German lines were now just a few tens of kilometers from the capital, and while German Bombers were able to benefit from fighter escort, the French bombers couldn't. However, Daillière was not a man to cancell such an operation because of his fear. 

 

The Jules Verne took of in the afternoon of the 7th of June, in order to arrive over Berlin in the middle of the night. It carried not only eight 250kg bombs, but also eighty 10kg incendiary bombs, stored in the fuselage. Going all the way through the North Sea, Denmark, and the Baltic sea, and using the city of Stettin (nowadays Szczecin, Poland) to find it's way and turn to the right direction, the Farman managed to reach Berlin. In order to not be detected, it performed a fake landing preparation for Tempelhof airfield, making the Germans believe it was one of their aircraft. Flying at just 350 Km/h and at an altitude of just 100 meters, the Jules Verne finally found it's target; it did not perform a terror raid, but an attack against a valid target: The Siemens factory of Berlin's suburbs

 

premiere-frappe-roy-grinnell.jpg

The Jules Verne's bombing mission - painting by Roy Grinnel

 

As the aircraft dropped it's payload (a long proccess; the eighty incendiary bombs had to be hand-dropped by two men), German anti-air artillery started to open fire; but the Jules Verne, after dropping all of it's bombs (and the shoe of the bomber, Corneillet, perhaps as a last "**** you" to Hitler) managed to escape, and safely landed at Orly airfield, near Paris, without having suffered significant damages. It safely landed at Orly airfield, near Paris, on the 8th of June morning, after eleven hour and forty minutes of flight; French newspapers did all relate the events, which ended up being an important propagande success in the dark hours of June 1940. This was the first bombing of Berlin during the Second World War, months before the British made their first attempts (which would end more tragically) Following this action, Daillière and his crew were condemned to Death by Nazi Germany, and treated of pirats; to this they responded, in the pure tradition of Surcouf or Duguay-Trouin, that they were in fact corsairs. 

 

On the 10th of June, the Jules Verne once again went for a mission in Germany; going straight into German territory after a stop at Chartres (where the crew learned the Declation of War from Italy), the Farman bombed the Heinkel factory of Rostock. It was, this time, rather heavily damaged, but, once again, made it out alive, and kicking. 

 

verne4.jpg

"The French naval aviation bomb the factories of Berlin's suburbs" ; from a French newspaper, 9th of June 1940

 

The missions of the Jules Verne did not end with it's successfull operation over Germany. On the 13th of June, it attacked Italy, as a retaliation for their declaration of war against France. The Jules Verne dropped it's bombs over the refiniries of Porto Maghera, and, in the same missions, dropped thousands of antifacist tracts over Rome. (It is even said that, to avoid any civilian on the ground being wounded, Daillière de-linked the tract bundles). Two other missions were performed over Italy, bombing Livourne and once again dropping tracts over Rome. The missions of the glorious Farman stopped on the 18th of June, the same day De Gaulle pronounced his speech that would later become famous; as France was seeking for an armistice, bombing the Axis forces was not judged a good idea. As Bordeaux fell into the German occupation zone, the Jules Verne (aswell as the three over Farman NC.223.4 , which had not been converted into bombers) was evacuated to Toulouse on the 24th of June. 

 

On the 7th of August 1940, the B5 squadron in which the Jules Verne operated was dissolved; the aircraft was hidden in Marignane, and Daillière ordered it to be destroyed if the Third Reich ever came to this place.

 

Daillière, as the respectable Corsair he was, died in combat on the 11th of October 1942; He was flying a reconnaissance Martin 167A3 over Freetown, Liberia. He was buried in Dakar, French Occidental Africa. 

 

offici10685.jpg

Henri-Laurent Daillière (1901-1942)

 

On the 11th of November 1942, the Third Reich launched operation "Anton": the occupation of the "Free" zone of France, entirely left to the Vichy administration; but before they reached Marignane, on the Southern Coast of France, the Jules Verne had already been burnt by an individual who is still unindentified today. 

 

II. Performances

 

To be honest, data lacks in terms of performance - I searched as deep as I could, but only barebones informations could be recovered. I believe French Military Archives should be checked for further informations.cMost performances, however, are most likely very close to the NC.223.3 we already have ingame

 

Maximum speed: 350 Km/h at least (Most likely around 400 Km/h

At altitude: 1,250m

Ceilling: More than 9,000 meters 

Powerplant: 4x Hispano-Suiza 12Y-37 (960hp)

Empty weight: Exact data unknow, around 10,000kg

Loaded weight: Exact data unknown, around 20,000kg

Payload: 8x250kg bombs, 80x10kg (incendiary) bombs, 1xShoe 

Armament: A Darne mle 1933 7.5x54mm mle 1929C machine-gun. 

Crew: 6 (Commander, pilot, co-pilot, navigator, bomber, mechanician)

 

III. Ingame

 

The NC.223.4 could, in my opinion, be a good BR 1.7 or 2.0 bomber. In comparison to the NC.223.3, it have comparable performances, but weaker armament and bombload. I think it could be a good premium aircraft, considering only a single NC.223.4 bomber existed. If the addition of this aircraft is considered, I would suggest adding a shoe-dropping animation, as it would justify the purchase of this aircraft because of it's uniqueness. 

 

IV. Sources

 

(Most of my sources are, sadly, in French language.)

 

http://batailles-1939-1940.historyboard.net/t322-le-farman-223-4-le-jules-verne-bombarde-berlin

http://www.opex360.com/2016/05/08/quand-laeronavale-francaise-bombardait-berlin/

http://ecole.nav.traditions.free.fr/officiers_dailliere_henri.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispano-Suiza_12Y (EN) 

http://www.avionslegendaires.net/avion-militaire/farman-nc-223/

https://hangar47.com/farman-nc-223-4-preview/ (EN)

 

Thanks for having read this suggestion ! 

 

 

 

Edited by Lord_Waka
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+1

 

i think the french need some more real bomber. after the NC.223.3, the bomber are so lightly loaded, they are nearly useless and carry less than the american fighter. i think the light bomber should be in a separate line than the heavy bomber for the french tree.

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58 minutes ago, CaID said:

after the NC.223.3, the bomber are so lightly loaded, they are nearly useless and carry less than the american fighter. i think the light bomber should be in a separate line than the heavy bomber for the french tree.

 

Well ...

 

The Potez 633 is an assault-bomber (like the Ju-87 Stuka);

The MB.174A3 is in fact a reconnaissance unit, with a small payload (it was intended as a bomber, but ... well... too small to carry something important);

I heard the MB.162 doesn't have his 3.6 tons of payload, only 2 tons;

 

There is many other kind of bombers here & there; even an other heavy-jet bomber from the late 40's. Give Gaijin some times to put some weight on this stock/initial tree.

Remember the US-tree: it's technically just recently that they separated the bomber branches.

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1 hour ago, CaID said:

+1

 

i think the french need some more real bomber. after the NC.223.3, the bomber are so lightly loaded, they are nearly useless and carry less than the american fighter. i think the light bomber should be in a separate line than the heavy bomber for the french tree.

 

They are comparable to other bombers of the era - the Stuka gets 500kg, the Su-2 600, Fairey Battle 1000lb (450kg) plus an overload of another 1000lb externally, TBD 1000-1200 lb (450-550 kg) etc.

 

Had the French fought on and developed them they would have received more powerful engines and heavier bombloads - in 1940 4-600 kg was the standard light bomber load and fighter bombers were a year or 2 ahead after 1940 showed light bombers were not actually a viable concept.

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2 hours ago, CaID said:

+1

 

i think the french need some more real bomber. after the NC.223.3, the bomber are so lightly loaded, they are nearly useless and carry less than the american fighter. i think the light bomber should be in a separate line than the heavy bomber for the french tree.

Alright, guess I'll suggest the Breguet Bre.682 then :P (It don't have a lot of bombs (2,500kg) but it's fast (560 Km/h))

 

bre482c.jpg?w=809

 

But to be fair, France could just have the best anti-tank aircraft line of history, with aircraft having the 450mm-pen T10 rocket as early as tiers I, thanks to the Algerian War attackers. 

 

1 hour ago, Josephs_Piano said:

 

They are comparable to other bombers of the era - the Stuka gets 500kg, the Su-2 600, Fairey Battle 1000lb (450kg) plus an overload of another 1000lb externally, TBD 1000-1200 lb (450-550 kg) etc.

 

Had the French fought on and developed them they would have received more powerful engines and heavier bombloads - in 1940 4-600 kg was the standard light bomber load and fighter bombers were a year or 2 ahead after 1940 showed light bombers were not actually a viable concept.

Light bombers not a viable concept ? I think you never heard of the Mosquito :P (Sure it had two engines, but it was still a light bomber) 

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1 minute ago, Lord_Waka said:

Light bombers not a viable concept ? I think you never heard of the Mosquito :P (Sure it had two engines, but it was still a light bomber) 

 

And it was an entirely different concept from the ones fielded in 1940, which I was clearly talking about......:facepalm:

Edited by Josephs_Piano
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Just now, Josephs_Piano said:

 

And it was an entirely different concept from the ones fielded in 1940......

Sure, it had nothing to do with 1940 designs. But it was still a light bomber by most regards.

 

And what about the SBD Dauntless ? It was put in service during 1940 and had quite the amazing service life. 

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3 minutes ago, Lord_Waka said:

Sure, it had nothing to do with 1940 designs. But it was still a light bomber by most regards.

 

By 1940 "regards" it was a medium or even a HEAVY bomber, and it ended up carrying heavier loads than the US "medium" bomber range.

 

Quote

 

And what about the SBD Dauntless ? It was put in service during 1940 and had quite the amazing service life. 

 

Indeed - as a naval dive bomber - again a different concept entirely....   although again it's load was entirely comparable.

 

Please try to not be argumentative

 

 

Edited by Josephs_Piano
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3 minutes ago, Josephs_Piano said:

 

By 1940 "regards" it was a medium or even a HEAVY bomber, nd it ended up carrying heavier loads than the US "medium" bomber range - try not to be argumentative.

 

 

Indeed - as a naval dive bomber - again a different concept entirely....   although again it's load was entirely comparable.

By 1940 regards the Mosquito just couldn't be judged effectively, being faster than a light bomber but carrying as much as an heavy one. However, I tought you meant the concept of light bomber was discarded for the whole war.

 

Wasn't the Ju 87 Stuka a dive bomber too ? :P

Edited by Lord_Waka
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The two reasons not to add this would be the weak armament combined with the low speed. and the lack of data available.

 

That being said I don't consider these reasons good enough not to add it. It would be a nice T1 premium plane.

Perhaps as a bundle with a novel? ;)

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Lord_Waka said:

By 1940 regards the Mosquito just couldn't be judged effectively, being faster than a light bomber but carrying as much as an heavy one.

 

And yet it is the comparison you chose to make.....

 

2 minutes ago, Lord_Waka said:

However, I tought you meant the concept of light bomber was discarded for the whole war.

 

Or you could have noticed that I was talking about contemporaries, and said "after 1940 showed light bombers were not actually a viable concept"....... clearly referring to those in service in 1940......or you might have realised you were wrong when I said that I was only referring to those in 1940 when I wrote in a reply "...the ones fielded in 1940" and stopped trolling at that point.

 

2 minutes ago, Lord_Waka said:

 

Wasn't the Ju 87 Stuka a dive bomber too ? :P

Which part of "NAVAL dive bomber" is it you don't understand?

 

Her's a potted history lesson for you, since you seem to have little idea of reality:

 

the Stuka was a land based light bomber that was designed to dive bomb - the Fairey Battle was also designed as a land based light bomber designed to dive bomb (yes, erally - it extended it's internal bombs and had dive brakes) both around the idea of supporting land forces.

 

Other light bombers of the era were also designed to support land forces - and ALL (including the SBD) were found to be vulnerable to flak and fighters and withdrawn from front line use ASAP - some were able to "soldier on" in areas where they didn't have to worry too much about those - eg French ones suffered badly when used against hte German front lines in 1944, so were withdrawn to help against the German occupied cities along the Atlantic coast until they surrendered, the RNZAF replaced SBD's with Corsairs ASAP because they were simply better - newer, faster, better armed, carried a bigger load, the USAAF pretty much only used them in Alaska.

 

the 1940-era bombers had successors in design or prototype stages, but few of them weer built, and they werr only operated in secondary theaters - eg Vultee Vengance (ironically a design started for the French!), the SB2C was un-needed by the USAAF, and none of the other allies wanted them either.  then there was the disaster known as the SB2A Buccaneer (Bermuda in British/Commonwealth service) - also initially ordered by the French and not delivered until 1942 by with time it was totally useless for anyone..   admittedly it was a crap aircraft produced by a crap company (Brewster) so it is possibly not a fair comparison with anything....never used in combat.

 

Hope this helps overcome your problem in this area.

 

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27 minutes ago, Josephs_Piano said:

 

And yet it is the comparison you chose to make.....

 

 

Or you could have noticed that I was talking about contemporaries, and said "after 1940 showed light bombers were not actually a viable concept"....... clearly referring to those in service in 1940......or you might have realised you were wrong when I said that I was only referring to those in 1940 when I wrote in a reply "...the ones fielded in 1940" and stopped trolling at that point.

 

Which part of "NAVAL dive bomber" is it you don't understand?

 

Her's a potted history lesson for you, since you seem to have little idea of reality:

 

the Stuka was a land based light bomber that was designed to dive bomb - the Fairey Battle was also designed as a land based light bomber designed to dive bomb (yes, erally - it extended it's internal bombs and had dive brakes) both around the idea of supporting land forces.

 

Other light bombers of the era were also designed to support land forces - and ALL (including the SBD) were found to be vulnerable to flak and fighters and withdrawn from front line use ASAP - some were able to "soldier on" in areas where they didn't have to worry too much about those - eg French ones suffered badly when used against hte German front lines in 1944, so were withdrawn to help against the German occupied cities along the Atlantic coast until they surrendered, the RNZAF replaced SBD's with Corsairs ASAP because they were simply better - newer, faster, better armed, carried a bigger load, the USAAF pretty much only used them in Alaska.

 

the 1940-era bombers had successors in design or prototype stages, but few of them weer built, and they werr only operated in secondary theaters - eg Vultee Vengance (ironically a design started for the French!), the SB2C was un-needed by the USAAF, and none of the other allies wanted them either.  then there was the disaster known as the SB2A Buccaneer (Bermuda in British/Commonwealth service) - also initially ordered by the French and not delivered until 1942 by with time it was totally useless for anyone..   admittedly it was a crap aircraft produced by a crap company (Brewster) so it is possibly not a fair comparison with anything....never used in combat.

 

Hope this helps overcome your problem in this area.

 

1. I made this comparison because I believed you meant light bombers were discarded for the whole war. 

2. "After 1940 showed light bombers were not a viable concept" : This could have meant they were not a viable concept from 1940 to,the end of the war.

3. I don't need your history lesson, thanks. 

 

The SBD Dauntless, used only in Alaska ? Wow. I didn't know the IJN focused all of it's efforts around the Alaska, considering the SBD is the aircraft that sunk the most important number of Japanese ships during the entire war. As far as I know they were usually towars the middle of the Pacific, the Fidjis or the Philippines.  That's fascinating, actually.

Of course the SBD was vulnerable without proper fighter cover. Pretty much any bomber except the Mosquito was. The point is, to properly use bombers, you need air superiority. Have you ever heard about the campaign of May-june 1940 ? Ju 87 Stuka had astonishing performances because they were escorted; otherwise it would have been a turkey shoot. On the other hand, maybe the LN 401 and LN 411 would have had astonishing performances, if the allies had the air superiority.

 

Please stop being arrogant and treating other like they have a knowledge that is necessarly inferior to yours. I am in no way trolling, or if I am, you are too, as you are doing the same thing as me: arguing. 

 

4. You put the line at naval. Why not put it a dive ? You create an arbitrary border for what you consider a 1940 light bomber and what you don't. And the concept of an arbitraty border you create is that it isn't universal. (PS: Was the Su-2 fitted with dive bombing sights ? I am not sure)

 

Edited by Lord_Waka
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@Lord_Waka

The epic Jules Verne "Corsair Plane" during the Battle of France, which was the first in history to bomb Berlin.

Sources : "Le Jules Verne, Avion Corsaire" d'Henri Yonnet, et la revue ICARE n°61

Edited by Xenecrite
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9 hours ago, Lord_Waka said:

Alright, guess I'll suggest the Breguet Bre.682 then :P (It don't have a lot of bombs (2,500kg) but it's fast (560 Km/h))

 

bre482c.jpg?w=809

 

But to be fair, France could just have the best anti-tank aircraft line of history, with aircraft having the 450mm-pen T10 rocket as early as tiers I, thanks to the Algerian War attackers. 

 

Light bombers not a viable concept ? I think you never heard of the Mosquito :P (Sure it had two engines, but it was still a light bomber) 

That does look fast.:DD

Edited by SAUBER_KH7
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9 hours ago, Xenecrite said:

@Lord_Waka

The epic Jules Verne "Corsair Plane" during the Battle of France, which was the first in history to bomb Berlin.

Sources : "Le Jules Verne, Avion Corsaire" d'Henri Yonnet, et la revue ICARE n°61

Very nice video... but you posted the French version :P 

 

 

9 hours ago, SAUBER_KH7 said:

That does look fast.:DD

We frenchies like fast bombers :P (Just look at the Vautour, or the MB.174; back in it's days even the BF 109E couldn't intercept it ! Well, it was mainly a reconnaissance plane... but still) 

 

19 hours ago, Lord_of_Sofa said:

The two reasons not to add this would be the weak armament combined with the low speed. and the lack of data available.

 

That being said I don't consider these reasons good enough not to add it. It would be a nice T1 premium plane.

Perhaps as a bundle with a novel? ;)

 

 

It is true the performances of the Jules Verne are not amazing, but I think the main reason for it's addition would be it's amazing story & performance in combat. 

 

I'm very concerned about the lack of data too - there is most likely some data about the standard NC.223.4 in the french archives, but most likely not about the Jules Verne conversion. I still believe we could find a relatively accurate estimation, however. 

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So basically what we have here is a unique version of the first bomber on the French tech tree, which has longer range, hardpoints instead of a bomb bay, and an extra machine gun on the right side?  Sounds good to me.

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On 11/5/2017 at 2:11 PM, Lord_of_Sofa said:

The two reasons not to add this would be the weak armament combined with the low speed. and the lack of data available.

 

That being said I don't consider these reasons good enough not to add it. It would be a nice T1 premium plane.

Perhaps as a bundle with a novel? ;)

 

6 hours ago, Z3r0_ said:

So basically what we have here is a unique version of the first bomber on the French tech tree, which has longer range, hardpoints instead of a bomb bay, and an extra machine gun on the right side?  Sounds good to me.

 

and if this picture is anything to go by, you'll also get a really good coffee too :P

 

premiere-frappe-roy-grinnell.jpg

 

+1 to the slightly less derpy looking version of the baguette barn bomber!

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7 hours ago, Admiral_Aruon said:

 

 

and if this picture is anything to go by, you'll also get a really good coffee too :P

 

premiere-frappe-roy-grinnell.jpg

 

+1 to the slightly less derpy looking version of the baguette barn bomber!

 

And a complementary espresso, even better! :016:

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On 07/11/2017 at 10:08 AM, Admiral_Aruon said:

 

 

and if this picture is anything to go by, you'll also get a really good coffee too :P

 

premiere-frappe-roy-grinnell.jpg

 

+1 to the slightly less derpy looking version of the baguette barn bomber!

Eh, it's true a less angular canopy helps quite a lot in looking more "normal" :P

 

But there are quite a lot of derpy looking Farman that would be enjoyable to see. I could notably mention the Farman F.221

 

 

img10010.jpg

The first in the 220/221/222/223 line to actually be put in service; just look at those nice boys from French Indochina, those little headlamps and... that canopy. We need it.

 

On 07/11/2017 at 3:46 AM, Z3r0_ said:

So basically what we have here is a unique version of the first bomber on the French tech tree, which has longer range, hardpoints instead of a bomb bay, and an extra machine gun on the right side?  Sounds good to me.

Well, it have an extra machine-gun... But the original cannons are gone, so in fact it lose quite a lot of firepower :/

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If this plane is going to be add, it will be the first civilian plane of the game (because before the war, he was a civilian plane namesd Farman 223 but when the war arrive, the Army has transformed the plane)

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On 16/06/2018 at 02:36, Atomeur said:

If this plane is going to be add, it will be the first civilian plane of the game (because before the war, he was a civilian plane namesd Farman 223 but when the war arrive, the Army has transformed the plane)

 

Hardly.  Most early war German bombers began as civil aircraft (granted, they were designed with the intent to convert them into bombers later).  Perhaps a better example would be the US' B-18, which is a militarized version of the DC-2 airliner; the original DC-2 was never made with military use in mind but this didn't bother the Army in the slightest since it was faster than the medium bombers already in service.

Edited by Z3r0_
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Suggestion passed to the developers for consideration.

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