OrsonES

War Thunder's Top Screenshots of the month competition September

OreoBird_147

Blackburn's Irregulars

Straight Screenshot

https://live.warthunder.com/post/655015/en/

 

59beaa5662959_shot2017_09_1711.53_09.thu

Lt. Cdr. J.T. Blackburn was the commander of VF-17: the most successful Corsair fighter unit of WWII. Because of the squadron's exceptional performance the gained the nickname ''Blackburn's Irregulars.''

The commander's F4U is depicted above. Shot taken from the 1.71 dev server. 

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                                                                                                    Pro100e
                                 https://live.warthunder.com/post/656312/en/

                                            10 points for Gryffindor                                                                     

shot+2017.09.20+12.29.12.jpg

Edited by Pro100e
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HowardHughes1947

"Scramble From Haleiwa Field"

Artistic Screenshot

https://live.warthunder.com/post/656939/en/

 

Scramble from Haleiwa Field.jpg

 

 

          This screenshot is based off of the historical scramble of pilots Kenneth M. Taylor and George Welch of the USAAC's 47th Fighter Pursuit Squadron on the morning of Dec. 7th, 1941 during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Taylor and Welch had moved their planes to Haleiwa Field, a small unpaved fighter strip, from Wheeler Airbase to better disperse their aircraft from the main fighter force at Wheeler in the event of sabotage or aerial attack. After a long night of playing poker and dancing at Wheeler Field's Officer's Club, they awoke late on Dec. 7th to the the sound of machine gun fire, low flying planes, and bombs exploding at roughly 7:55 a.m., a mere hour and a half after they had gone to sleep. Taylor quickly put on his tuxedo pants from the night before and called Haleiwa airstrip to have their P40B's armed and refueled. Driving a Buick at speeds of up to 100 miles an hour, they drove 10 miles to the airfield while being strafed on multiple occasions by Japanese aircraft. When they arrived they scrambled their planes, which had been refueled but armed only with .30 caliber Browning ammunition. They headed towards Barber's Point on the Southwestern tip of Oahu, initially seeing a flight of B17 Flying Fortresses which were nearly out of fuel and trying to land at multiple airfields around the harbor. When they eventually arrived at Ewa Mooring Mast Field they saw that it was being strafed by 12 Japanese Aichi D3A1 "Val" dive bombers, and they proceeded to engage, with Taylor shooting down two and damaging a third and Welch scoring an additional two shot down (one of Welch's 2 victories was only claimed and it returned to it's carrier damaged after the attack). They landed at 8:40 a.m. to rearm with .50 caliber ammunition at Wheeler Field and had to dodge friendly anti aircraft shells and ground fire. As they were being rearmed, they came under attack by 12 more "Val" dive bombers, and scrambled for a second time. Taylor still had ammunition boxes left on his wing by the ground crew who scattered to protect themselves from the incoming attack, and they fell off as he motored down the runway, his P40 barely passing over an ammunition dolly that was left out in the open prior to the first attack wave. They took off toward the enemy to avoid becoming strafing targets as they took off, with Taylor performing a 180 degree climbing turn, nicknamed a chandelle, while opening fire on the incoming planes. Taylor was hit with shrapnel fragments of a bullet from the rear gunner of a dive bomber that exploded less than an inch from his head, with pieces entering his left arm and leg. Taylor reflected on the injuries he sustained in a 2001 interview, saying "It was of no consequence; it just scared the hell out of me for a minute." A few years after the interview, Taylor received from his crew chief two other slugs that had been found behind his seat. The bomber that had wounded Taylor was soon shot down by Welch, and they then broke away to pursue a formation of A6M Zeroes. Welch then proceeded to shoot down a Zero about 5 miles West of Barber's Point, and Taylor chased the retreating Japanese aircraft, expending the rest of his ammunition before the two pilots returned to Haleiwa. 

          When they returned to Wheeler still wearing their tuxedo attire, their commanding officer, Major Gordon H. Austin, who was unaware of their earlier dogfights, shouted at the two men, saying "Get back to Haleiwa! You know there's a war on?" The two pilots then explained what they had done, and the commander thanked them. According to the 25th Infantry Division's Tropic Lightning Museum, 14 different American pilots were able to take off during the surprise attack and record 10 Japanese aircraft kills. Air Corps records credit Welch with four kills and Taylor with two, yet new research of Japanese combat reports confirms Taylor got four kills (when the two probable kills are included). Taylor claimed in an interview: "I know for certain I shot down two planes or perhaps more; I don't know." On the 13th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, the United States Air Force stated that they could not determine which of the two pilots shot down the first Japanese bomber: "Each of them in his first attack shot down an enemy bomber, so the difference in time would have been but a few seconds in any case." While in the air during the dogfight, the two pilots agreed that whoever survived the battle would claim credit to the title for the first kill. However, both pilots survived and because Welch outranked Taylor (he was a 41A, Taylor a 41C) and was the lead aircraft in the fight, he was credited with the first kill. The efforts of the two pilots’ dogfights were able to divert the Japanese from destroying the Haleiwa airfield, which the Japanese intelligence did not know about prior to the attack. Taylor later reacted to the attack, saying "I believed I was a better-trained pilot than the enemy. I had good equipment, and I was proud of it."

          Both men received the Distinguished Service Cross for their actions, and although they were recommended for the Congressional Medal of Honor, they were denied due to them taking off without orders. Welch died testing the F-100 Super Sabre on October 12th, 1954. Although he had ejected, he was in critical condition when found in his seat and was pronounced dead on arrival at the Air Force Hospital following a helicopter medivac from the scene. Kenneth Taylor also would later receive the Legion of Merit, the Air Medal, and a Purple Heart for injuries he sustained. He retired from the Air force in 1967 and retired a Brigadier General from the Alaska Air National guard in 1971. He died in 2005, aged 86, at an assisted living facility in Tuscon, Arizona. He was cremated and buried at Arlington National Cemetery, the same place where his former wingman George Welch was laid to rest some 52 years earlier.  In 1970, their actions were immortalized by the film "Tora Tora Tora," in which they were portrayed by actors Carl Reindel and Rick Cooper.

Information regarding George Welch and Kenneth M. Taylor found using wikipedia:

 

Kenneth Taylor - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_M._Taylor

George Welch - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Welch_(pilot)

"Tora Tora Tora" scene depicting their actions - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qd5ZBoRzr3I

Historical analysis of the film - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PfdQod8HTw

Edited by HowardHughes1947
Addition of Description and resources/sources
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5 hours ago, HowardHughes1947 said:

HowardHughes1947

"Scramble From Haleiwa Field"

Artistic Screenshot

https://live.warthunder.com/post/656939/en/

 

Scramble from Haleiwa Field.jpg

 

 

          This screenshot is based off of the historical scramble of pilots Kenneth M. Taylor and George Welch of the USAAC's 47th Fighter Pursuit Squadron on the morning of Dec. 7th, 1941 during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Taylor and Welch had moved their planes to Haleiwa Field, a small unpaved fighter strip, from Wheeler Airbase to better disperse their aircraft from the main fighter force at Wheeler in the event of sabotage or aerial attack. After a long night of playing poker and dancing at Wheeler Field's Officer's Club, they awoke late on Dec. 7th to the the sound of machine gun fire, low flying planes, and bombs exploding at roughly 7:55 a.m., a mere hour and a half after they had gone to sleep. Taylor quickly put on his tuxedo pants from the night before and called Haleiwa airstrip to have their P40B's armed and refueled. Driving a Buick at speeds of up to 100 miles an hour, they drove 10 miles to the airfield while being strafed on multiple occasions by Japanese aircraft. When they arrived they scrambled their planes, which had been refueled but armed only with .30 caliber Browning ammunition. They headed towards Barber's Point on the Southwestern tip of Oahu, initially seeing a flight of B17 Flying Fortresses which were nearly out of fuel and trying to land at multiple airfields around the harbor. When they eventually arrived at Ewa Mooring Mast Field they saw that it was being strafed by 12 Japanese Aichi D3A1 "Val" dive bombers, and they proceeded to engage, with Taylor shooting down two and damaging a third and Welch scoring an additional two shot down (one of Welch's 2 victories was only claimed and it returned to it's carrier damaged after the attack). They landed at 8:40 a.m. to rearm with .50 caliber ammunition at Wheeler Field and had to dodge friendly anti aircraft shells and ground fire. As they were being rearmed, they came under attack by 12 more "Val" dive bombers, and scrambled for a second time. Taylor still had ammunition boxes left on his wing by the ground crew who scattered to protect themselves from the incoming attack, and they fell off as he motored down the runway, his P40 barely passing over an ammunition dolly that was left out in the open prior to the first attack wave. They took off toward the enemy to avoid becoming strafing targets as they took off, with Taylor performing a 180 degree climbing turn, nicknamed a chandelle, while opening fire on the incoming planes. Taylor was hit with shrapnel fragments of a bullet from the rear gunner of a dive bomber that exploded less than an inch from his head, with pieces entering his left arm and leg. Taylor reflected on the injuries he sustained in a 2001 interview, saying "It was of no consequence; it just scared the hell out of me for a minute." A few years after the interview, Taylor received from his crew chief two other slugs that had been found behind his seat. The bomber that had wounded Taylor was soon shot down by Welch, and they then broke away to pursue a formation of A6M Zeroes. Welch then proceeded to shoot down a Zero about 5 miles West of Barber's Point, and Taylor chased the retreating Japanese aircraft, expending the rest of his ammunition before the two pilots returned to Haleiwa. 

          When they returned to Wheeler still wearing their tuxedo attire, their commanding officer, Major Gordon H. Austin, who was unaware of their earlier dogfights, shouted at the two men, saying "Get back to Haleiwa! You know there's a war on?" The two pilots then explained what they had done, and the commander thanked them. According to the 25th Infantry Division's Tropic Lightning Museum, 14 different American pilots were able to take off during the surprise attack and record 10 Japanese aircraft kills. Air Corps records credit Welch with four kills and Taylor with two, yet new research of Japanese combat reports confirms Taylor got four kills (when the two probable kills are included). Taylor claimed in an interview: "I know for certain I shot down two planes or perhaps more; I don't know." On the 13th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, the United States Air Force stated that they could not determine which of the two pilots shot down the first Japanese bomber: "Each of them in his first attack shot down an enemy bomber, so the difference in time would have been but a few seconds in any case." While in the air during the dogfight, the two pilots agreed that whoever survived the battle would claim credit to the title for the first kill. However, both pilots survived and because Welch outranked Taylor (he was a 41A, Taylor a 41C) and was the lead aircraft in the fight, he was credited with the first kill. The efforts of the two pilots’ dogfights were able to divert the Japanese from destroying the Haleiwa air field, which the Japanese intelligence did not know about prior to the attack. Taylor later reacted to the attack, saying "I believed I was a better-trained pilot than the enemy. I had good equipment, and I was proud of it."

          Both men received the Distinguished Service Cross for their actions, and although they were recommended for the Congressional Medal of Honor, they were denied due to them taking off without orders. Welch died testing the F-100 Super Sabre on October 12th, 1954. Although he had ejected, he was in critical condition when found in his seat and was pronounced dead on arrival at the Air Force Hospital following a helicopter medivac from the scene. Kenneth Taylor also would later receive the Legion of Merit, the Air Medal, and a Purple Heart for injuries he sustained. He retired from the Air force in 1967 and retired a Brigadier General from the Alaska Air National guard in 1971. He died in 2005, aged 86, at an assisted living facility in Tuscon, Arizona. He was cremated and buried at Arlington National Cemetery, the same place where his former wingman George Welch was laid to rest some 52 years earlier.  In 1970, their actions were immortalized by the film "Tora Tora Tora," in which they were portrayed by actors Carl Reindel and Rick Cooper.

Information regarding George Welch and Kenneth M. Taylor found using wikipedia:

 

Kenneth Taylor - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_M._Taylor

George Welch - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Welch_(pilot)

"Tora Tora Tora" scene depicting their actions - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qd5ZBoRzr3I

Historical analysis of the film - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PfdQod8HTw

 

 

Darned well love your screenshots m8. They have a very real feel to them. makes it seem more like real life then a game :salute:

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56 minutes ago, ROOKIE101 said:

 

 

Darned well love your screenshots m8. They have a very real feel to them. makes it seem more like real life then a game :salute:

 

Thanks ROOKIE, I always try to base mine off of either real stories or historical scenarios, and try to depict the situations in the best light possible to replicate what it must have been like for those men to have fought back then.  The only negative is that a lot of research is required to gather proper conditions to take the unedited shot and furthermore to make proper adjustments to things such as weather, aircraft modifications, camouflages, ID numbers, etc., and as a result take a lot of time.  That said thanks again, and I look forward to seeing some more of your posts on .Live :salute:;)

 

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