Tantor57

MG 131 effectiveness

Hello guys.

 

Today id like to talk about the MG131 effectiveness. I know there has been some debate before bout this "obscure" weapon to say the least, since war reports concerning the effectiveness of the weapon are as rare as the reports saying how the MG 17 was lacking are legion.

 

My concern is that MG 131 ingame now are much much much better than what they were before but they seem "random" in terms of damages, they can either destroy control surface or a whole wing in one short burst and another time all the do is making noise...

 

So i would like to gather opinion about the MG 131 effectiveness in order to determines if they are modelled correctly in game or not. I tried to search both German and allied reports about this weapon but i must say i havent been really successful.

 

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Nothing scientific, but here is a size comparison. I might get you something concrete later.

 

4f5daa0e1a05ed047e9cf36bc9350c94.png

Edited by Ulatersk
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it should be mentioned that unlike the M2 ie the 13mm of the germans relied on the small HE filling inside... 've heard that the japanese 7mm HE rounds already did a small, but nice amount of damage

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1.3 g of PETN and 0.3 g of thermite IIRC was used as the explosive/incendiary filler for MG 131 bullets, wouldnt do much on armored parts but parts of the plane such as wings, fuselage and control surfaces would take quite huge amount of damage if hit by few of these bullets.

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32 minutes ago, RohmMohc said:

it should be mentioned that unlike the M2 ie the 13mm of the germans relied on the small HE filling inside... 've heard that the japanese 7mm HE rounds already did a small, but nice amount of damage

every nation had 7mm that exploded. Its just AP-I.

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21 hours ago, KillaKiwi said:

every nation had 7mm that exploded. Its just AP-I.

Japanese literally had HE 7.7mm rounds.

with PETN and everything

Type_92_7.7_mm_semi-rimmed.jpg

 

Hell, I'm also fairly positive they made a HE round for their MG 15's (Type 98 I think they called it)

YjTyYHn.png

(just don't ask me how small the filler atually was)

Edited by Hopit
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1 minute ago, fufubear said:

The MG 15 would be the type 1 machine gun. 

Type 98 for the Army, Type 1 for the Navy.

(Imperial Japanese military, yay)

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15 minutes ago, Max__Damage said:

According to a soviet pilot i ve read, he would prefer 1 berezin over 2 german heavy machineguns. 

And how many heavy machine guns do you think germans had?

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33 minutes ago, Hopit said:

And how many heavy machine guns do you think germans had?

 

Barely any. The MG 131 was really the most prolific one. Curious how they didn't make HMGs earlier. Anyone know why?

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4 minutes ago, Nope said:

 

Barely any. The MG 131 was really the most prolific one. Curious how they didn't make HMGs earlier. Anyone know why?

If you can even call the MG 131 a "heavy" MG, considering it only weights 16.6kg's (MG 42 somewhere around 12kg)

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1 hour ago, Hopit said:

If you can even call the MG 131 a "heavy" MG, considering it only weights 16.6kg's (MG 42 somewhere around 12kg)

 

HMG designation is based on the caliber, not the weight. 13x64B fits the bill.

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12 minutes ago, Nope said:

 

HMG designation is based on the caliber, not the weight. 13x64B fits the bill.

That's more modern basis for it and to my knowledge germans did not rate the machinguns as heavy based on their caliber but how they were employed

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2 hours ago, Nope said:

 

Barely any. The MG 131 was really the most prolific one. Curious how they didn't make HMGs earlier. Anyone know why?

 

Doctrinal differences I guess?

 

Remember that the Germans built their squads around a GPMG, a heavy machine gun would have likely been an unnecessary luxury for them.

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1 minute ago, Doktor_Junkers said:

 

Doctrinal differences I guess?

 

Remember that the Germans built their squads around a GPMG, a heavy machine gun would have likely been an unnecessary luxury for them.

also it's amusing considering using the MG34 and 42 allowed them to continue to produce only one kind of rifle ammo... since itu used the same rounds as the normal infantry rifles... a 12,7 or 13mm HMG would've only added an increase of different ammos... even if it would've used the same one as the planes... they would've needed to produce, and supply more ammo

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3 minutes ago, RohmMohc said:

also it's amusing considering using the MG34 and 42 allowed them to continue to produce only one kind of rifle ammo... since itu used the same rounds as the normal infantry rifles... a 12,7 or 13mm HMG would've only added an increase of different ammos... even if it would've used the same one as the planes... they would've needed to produce, and supply more ammo

 

That's what I meant when I was saying "Unnessecary luxury".

 

It's funny if you consider that they had the Tank und Flieger machine gun in development at the end of WWI, which was basically an inferior version of the .50.

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24 minutes ago, Doktor_Junkers said:

 

That's what I meant when I was saying "Unnessecary luxury".

 

It's funny if you consider that they had the Tank und Flieger machine gun in development at the end of WWI, which was basically an inferior version of the .50.

it's even more funny if you consider that hte first ammos of the .50 cals were based on the Ammo of the Mauser Anti-Tank Gewehr because seemingly the US Engineers weren't able to built a round powerful enough to accomplish what they wanted...

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I can't find any sources but i think this is damage by 7mm HEI

40e13afa43977b29dff8382997c29c25.jpg

Edited by Ryan97226
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12 hours ago, Nope said:

 

Barely any. The MG 131 was really the most prolific one. Curious how they didn't make HMGs earlier. Anyone know why?

 

They did, in fact. MG 151/15.

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35 minutes ago, Kurfurst_HUN said:

They did, in fact. MG 151/15.

 

That's more among the lines of superior to 14.5mm, not roughly equivalent to .50 BMG. 15mm and above is a cannon.

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MG = Maschinengewehr.

 

Depends on who's definition, personally I have never seen anywhere that 15mm would be already a cannon, but whatever.

 

BTW its perfectly comparable in size, weight, and even round size to the .50 BMG, its just a bit more powerful round. But for the LW it was soon realized its better to have a 2cm cannon in that package size, even with reduced ballistics.

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3 hours ago, Kurfurst_HUN said:

MG = Maschinengewehr.

 

Depends on who's definition, personally I have never seen anywhere that 15mm would be already a cannon, but whatever.

 

BTW its perfectly comparable in size, weight, and even round size to the .50 BMG, its just a bit more powerful round. But for the LW it was soon realized its better to have a 2cm cannon in that package size, even with reduced ballistics.

 

The 2cm cannons also were referred to as MG.

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