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So let's talk Situational Awareness in Simulator Battle


To the editing, could this be a solution?

 

Just use Spoiler at the index list?

 

Something like this:

 

Topics

 

Please feel free to pick any individual or multiple topics to discuss methodology.

 

Basic (Skills)
•SA Basic #1 - Visual and Auditory Cues for one's own aircraft behavior
•SA Basic #2 - Your Aircraft (Performance, Fuel, Ammo and Temperatures)
•SA Basic #3 - Accurate judgement of one's own relative position
•SA Basic #4 - Tracking an enemy's position

[spoiler]Elgonidas
To keep track of targets far below me while I maneuver and/or check my surroundings, I like to consciously pick out landmarks close to, and preferably slightly in front of the target. This'll narrow my search if I don't spot them immediately from "somewhere in that general direction" to "somewhere near that landmark". Good landmarks are of course forests, rivers, cities and the like, but more often than not, I end up picking out a particularly bright or dark field near them. It should go without saying that their speed and direction is important here as well. Keeping track of a maneuvering target can be a bit more challenging, but as long as you're not looking away for several seconds, reacquiring visual should not be too difficult.

A good technique for picking out targets against the ground is focusing on a fixed point on the ground, letting your eyes pick up the movement of the plane instead of actively looking for a tiny black dot. Give them a second or two before you shift your gaze and repeat until you spot something.
[/spoiler]
•SA Basic #5 - Accurate judgement of an enemy's relative position
•SA Basic #6 - Dealing with visual obstruction of the cockpit and the aircraft body

[spoiler]•Machineabuse
A thing I do prior to a match is set-and-forget my TrackIR center position in a slightly hunched over position. This means when I am sitting normally my virtual head is high and back in the cockpit and affords me the best view over the rim of the cockpit in most aircraft.

When I need to shoot, I hunch back into position to see the aiming reticule. In some aircraft with offset sights I will bias my center position so that when sitting upright my view is high and center in the pit, giving me equal visibility off both sides of the aircraft.[/spoiler]
•SA Basic #7 - Supplementing SA with cockpit instrumentation
•SA Basic #8 - Checking surroundings while offensive
•SA Basic #9 - Balancing watching aircraft vector and assailant while defensive

Edited by Senilix
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The "problem" for you Machineabuse will be the use of time editing :learn: ​and not flying, until the thread has calmed Down ;)s ​

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Not a bad idea, and keeping the link to the official wiki as a pinned topic with a description of the wiki content...

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Hmm, it would appear that the spoiler tags have some kind of limitation based around what looks like number of horizontal text lines before they stop working. I may have to hold off on this until I have a more organized way of implementing it.

I like the idea for a wiki, I was thinking that an external repository was the ultimate form of this. Still, I'm quite happy that this appears to have gained some traction with the community and could potentially be a wider resource :)

Don't worry about me; I'm quite inspired from seeing so many Youtube videos and other resources having been made by and for this community and thought I'd give back to that in my own way.

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I did, but it would seem one of the issues is that at some point the editing becomes quite difficult to deal with as the window becomes rather dense. I also have a hard time deciding whether to put titles on the outside and keep the spoiler tags just for content.

I will play with it some more until I can find a happy medium I think.

One thing that helps me truth check for overall readability is how well the format shows on mobile, since I'm sure quite a few regulars will consume it through there.

I probably also need to start versioning the updates.

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I will be writing up another contribution or two in a few days. Not sure what I'll write yet, but I have a few ideas floating around.
Just a bit too preoccupied to do it right now. Edited by Elgonidas
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I will be writing up another contribution or two in a few days. Not sure what I'll write yet, but I have a few ideas floating around.
Just a bit too preoccupied to do it right now.

"When it's done" is OK by me :)

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Good old pilot psychology.

I've been finding it harder to maintain SA in WT since 1.51 because the cloud rendering problems only got worse and the dots are harder to see (they are about 30-50% opacity beyond 2.5-4km depending on the plane and when the silhouette does appear they're usually easy to spot, upsetting my spotting effort balance) while if I get a little be closer to the silhouette or zoom in on it the actual model appears and I can no longer see it if the plane is brighly coloured (e.g. B29s... Yes, even those big planes). This means that when I track players I often need to stay at one zoom level which is exceedingly frustrating considering that one tap on the hatswitch is enough to rotate one full screen width when zoomed in due to my framerates and head-rotation rate. I find that if I reduce the rotation rate dogfighting is hard because I can't track the enemy when they're on my six, particularly if slightly above. And whenever I zoom out beyond default FoV my framerate decreases anyway so I almost never play zoomed out like most head-tracker players.

A lot of you may notice that I prefer to fly within 2km-6km and the reason for this is I prefer to be above the enemy so I can spot them against the ground. It is easier for me to spot them against the ground and I cannot spot against the clouds due to a certain bug that gaijin simply will not fix so inevitably my playstyle is in the vertical. I drag them up, potentially bleeding their energy (or rather I increase the kinetic/potential total energy difference) by abusing my wing lift for a slight vertical advantage and dodge simultaneously while they try to prop hang as they get a shot onto me and then I zoom back onto them. It is sometimes a bit tricky to tell when they're about to run out of energy since the 1.51 update and the water/tree rendering really hurts my aim when I zoom back onto them but well, it's easier than trying to prop hang and get someone in fear that I know they will be able to get onto me easily.

Regarding nose visibility I actually use a cheap trick as a non-head tracking user.
I almost permanently leave my head vision at the top of the aiming recticle in half of the planes (fockewulfs, bf 109s) and in others with somewhat excellent vertical cockpit visibility above the nose (like the Me 262) I shift the head even higher, and slightly forwards if I must to get a view around the headrest while maintaining horizontal head movement control (since it deminishes as you shift forward). However in some aircraft like the A6M3 and the Meteor mk 3-4 range, I permanently have the head in the upper most position unless I am sniping (by which I sometimes snipe without the aiming sight anyway) and use my "center view" button to aim. This means I cannot aim where I need to do a horizontal deflection shot or while I'm tracking someone above me but most of the time I don't need to anyway.

When I aim like this I literally just use my mouse-joystick interface as a pseudo-crosshair. This video in the spoiler was from over a year ago when I recently started playing simulator. My current framerates are worse than then of course but I was worse at tracking players anyhow and I've gained tactical knowledge and experience so in the end I'm still better than I was back then.
[spoiler]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ARCx8sA1Lc[/spoiler]

You could call it an exploit of the game interface but it isn't always reliable anyway such as when the aircraft shakes when getting bombarded by artillery (it changes the angular perspective as well) but this is a well-required tactic of mine considering I cannot waste time doing blind-leads with my horrible framerate which poses a severe latency on my input (it takes me about half a second most of the time before ANY input is registered, including typing text) coupled with the aircraft's own dampness I need to counter to prevent the bounce as such. I found leading exceedingly easy on my brother's computer when I had good framerates in a plane like the bf 109 E-1 where there's already a lot of dampening and so-so nose visibility simply because I had the framerates that would allow the plane to obey my input on-demand.
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  • SA Advanced #2 - Disengaging an offensive

Disengaging a offensive position can be a really hard choice. You are in a preferable position, maybe you are shooting, but then it comes. The weird feeling out of your subconscious that calls to you: "get out of here, its not safe".
You look around you see nothing. You continue the chase. You get drawn into the fight. Somebody of higher altitude pounces you and you are dead.
Maybe you got the kill, maybe not. Doesn't matter now because you are dead.

First tip:
Hear to your subconscious! It's not the force or something^^ But that feeling in your gut tells you that you are vulnerable. Break off your attack if you get a bad feeling.

Many Pilots believe that the ability to turn makes a good plane. Fact is that good turning planes are rather slow planes. At least in a lot of cases. Slower planes are able to dodge attacks with ease and they can slot in behind slower planes six without a problem.
And here it comes: Most planes aren't slower. Most enemy planes are faster than a good turning plane (Zero, Ki43, Spitfire)

Faster planes on the other side can close the gap to the enemy if he is trying to disengage and can easily disengage when he holds his speed up.
A faster plane can dictate the fight: can buy time, can attack when he wants and can disengage at will.
A turning plane is always in the defensive when slower than the enemy. Can only disengage when the attacker is busy, or has lost sight, is dead. 

So we come to the conclusion:
In a faster plane:
Fly at high alt where nobody is. Pick planes at the top of their loops/climbs (therefore high energy gap)
Don't do sustained turns with your enemy. That closes the energy gap between you and your target. A good turner wants that.
Disengage after each strike, judge the situation, then disengage completely or reengage the fight when in preferable position.(which means nobody can touch you booty after reengaging)
While judging if I reengage i do the following:
1. I check my six if somebody is following my climb.
2. A quick 360° check if there are planes at my alt.
3. A quick peek at higher alts.
4. I check my temperatures. (that important! What is a fast plane with a dead engine? Yes a downed one! Your engine must be cool enough to keep you running away from your enemy for minutes after reengaging)

In a good turning plane:
You want to surprise your opponent at the smallest energy gap possible. So low and slow on the deck right? Hoping that a slow plane comes along.... God no!
Close the energy gap by flying high and fast. look at the surprised eyes of that Dora pilot when a Spitfire comes from 2k meters higher than him. He cant do much on this conditions. He cant turn, he cant climb away, and he cant fly away in a straight line. He is temporarily slower than you. But he can dive away. Try to kill him before that or disengage by leveling out or climbing away.
If you dive after him you lose that energy advantage you builded up before so patiently. Let him disengage, maybe he comes up again if he wants to die or he is down at the deck. that's a kind of success as well. You didn't killed the plane but you killed his energy and his fighting potential.

(will do a typo sweep later on)



 

Edited by Der_Sheriff
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Will update that into the main post as soon as you're happy with it to minimize any degradation Sheriff!

@ZdrytchX Added your submission!

By the way. this resource is not only open for submissions of full posts. If anyone has any topics you think should be covered please let me know. Expanding the topic list helps people with the knowledge know the gaps they need to fill in our collective education.

I also gotta say I am blown away by the amount of support this thread has gotten. I am proud to serve you all  :salute:

Also in Situational Awareness News; The latest patch has revised mirrors. Hope I will find the time to try them out in combat soon.

Edited by Machineabuse

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • SA Basic #2 - Your Aircraft (Performance, Fuel, Ammo and Temperatures)

A very useful thing to do is have some method of note taking with you while you fly or experiment with airframes in test flight. While the stat cards in the game give you the performance parameters of the aircraft you are flying what they don't tell you are the behavior of the aircraft while flying it. Externalizing information in this way helps you wrap your head around the idiosyncrasies of an airframe before you have to learn the hard way in battle or refresh your memory as you transition between airframes.

Recently I have taken to using my phone with [url=http://i.imgur.com/XZ2K84C.png]Google Sheets[/url] for my note taking purposes, since I normally fly at night with the lights off it is the most practical method for me. I typically take a plane I intend to fly into a test flight then fill out the spreadsheet as I go with SWAG* values. It's time well spent if you're going to get into an unfamiliar plane.

*Scientific Wild A$$ Guess

 

Edited by Machineabuse
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  • 3 months later...

Thanks to all of you for the time you have taken to create and contribute to this thread.  Machineabuse thanks for starting and maintaining it; thanks to all the contributors for sharing. :salute:

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Thanks to all of you for the time you have taken to create and contribute to this thread.  Machineabuse thanks for starting and maintaining it; thanks to all the contributors for sharing. :salute:

I hope it helped you m8!

I've been meaning to do an update, now that I've gained a fair bit of experience since I started it :)

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  • 1 month later...
  • 6 months later...
  • 11 months later...

jFo0SeH.png

 

Due to this idiotic setting situational awareness is not a topic worth discussing in SB air warblunder.

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  • 8 months later...

So good info...but I disagree with this part:

 

  • Yapan SA Coms #4 - 2 Plane Buddy Tactics

Divide your work! The biggest mistake I see people doing; while flying together is that both are scanning 360 area - often one behind another as in finger four formation. Wrong! Finger four was to preserve the leader (as he was often the precious skilled pilot), the wingman/men were considered cannon fodder who's six was covered worse, than if he would be flying alone! Line abreast! Fly wing to wing! Aim for 500m separation, and finally gain total 360 watch by:

post-223407-0-59415400-1451052889_thumb.

Red area is where a wingman should look for contacts, while blue area is area where leader should look for. This way you achieve a few things:

  1. you cover whole 360° and all blind spots.
  2. each of you look just to the one side, 180° - that's just half of work to do!
  3. you got your wingman almost constantly in eyesight, which makes formation flying a lot easier.

Trust your wingman!

If you fly line abreast formation, then your visual lookout is THROUGH your wingman and outside.  His is the same. This enables you to more effectively clear his six (and his blind spots) and vice versa.  If you are on voice comms (and I think you would be), then when you start looking "Outside the formation", you need to communicate it so he can do same on his side.  Why is this important? Because you can pick up bandits further out, and you should never "trust" your wingman to be perfect (trust but verify!). So 80% looking through your wingman, and 20% outside the formation as a good rule of thumb.

 

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