Jump to content
Boleslaw_Orlinski_w_Mosquito.jpg
Commander of No 305 (Polish) bomber squadron, famous aviator who flew from Warsaw to Tokyo (10,300 km/6,400 miles) and W/Cdr Orlinski with his navigator F/O Lemieszonek. in cockpit of Mosquito
 
 
Ace: Bolesław Orliński (by the way, "Orli" means "Eagle's")
Nationality: Polish
Service: Polish Air Force (in UK)
Aircraft: De Havilland Mosquito
Variant: FB.VI
Serial Number: LR303 code: SM-A
Time Frame: 1944
Approved by Biographer:
 
Plane pictures
 
SM_A_LR303.jpg
Epinoy, France, probably soon after the war. The CO's aircraft, and its crew: W/Cdr Orlinski and F/O Lemieszonek. (Tomasz Wilczewski archives) Source
 
Scale model to see how it can look in game:
IMG_1042.jpg
 
Time for story
I base on English wiki, but I checked and added information from article (in Polish) published in magazine
Przegląd lotniczy Aviation Revue (03/1997; 04/1997; 05/1997; 06/1997; 07/1997; 08/1997; 09/1997; 10/1997;11/1997;12/1997;1/1998; 2/1998; 3/1998;) written by Stanisław Babiarz  andStanisław Biasak.
 

Bolesław Orliński (13 April 1899 - 28 February 1992) was a Polish aviator, military, sports and test pilot.

He was born on the family estate in Niwerka, Podolia (now Niverka, Kamianets-Podilskyi Raion, Khmelnytskyi Oblast, Ukraine). He had two sisters. In 1909 Russian pilot visited Kamianets-Podilskyi on Farman 4, and since then Bolesłae fall in love with planes, however father opposed that..

 

During World War I he was commissioned in the Russian Army,  He was company guarding airfield in Vinnytsia, where he also met Igor Sikorsky . He applied to flying school, however situation on front changed. he fought in an infantry Regiment on the German front, becoming a NCO.

In 1917 he joined the newly formed Polish 1st Corps of Gen. Józef Dowbór-Muśnicki. When the corps was disarmed by the Germans in May 1918 he went to the Ukraine to search not diarmed Polish unit. However Ukrainian Ukrainian People's Republic was proclaimed and he was forced to join and briefly served in the army of the Ukrainian People's Republic. He returned to Poland in January 1919 and joined the Polish Army, but as a provate, because earlier during escape he destroyed his documents. He served in the cavalry during the Polish-Soviet war, and then volunteered for the air force.

 

He completed pilot training in Bydgoszcz and Grudziądz and in 1923 became an instructor in Grudziądz.

From 27 August to 25 September 1926, with mechanic Leon Kubiak, Orliński flew from Warsaw to Tokyo (10,300 km/6,400 miles) and back in a Breguet 19 A2. On the way back the plane was damaged by wind in Byrka and its left lower wing was broken and propeller was cracked. The Polish aviators removed cover from opposite wing and repaired the propeller with glue and wire, and thus repaired flew the 6680 km to Warsaw. For the feat Orliński was awarded the Japanese Order of the Rising Sun 6th class, French Legion of Honor and was promoted to Captain.

 

1024px-Breguet_XIX_Orlinskiego_i_Kubiaka

 

In 1928 he quit the service to  get married (being a unmarried was a condition to be in 11 fighter regiment)  and became a test pilot with the Polish PZL aviation works in Warsaw. He test-flew all PZL fighter prototypes, from the PZL P.1 designed by Zygmunt Puławski in 1928, through the PZL P.6, PZL P.7, PZL P.8, PZL P.11, PZL P.24 to PZL P.50 Jastrząb in 1939. He also tested the sports planes PZL.19, PZL.26, passenger planes PZL.4, PZL.44 Wicher, and liaison plane PZL Ł.2.

 

Apart from his test pilot work, he took part in numerous aviation contests and presentations of Polish aircraft abroad. Flying the PZL.5 he participated in the Challenge 1930 international touring planes contest, but failed to finish due to engine failure on 26 July. In December 1930 he presented the fighter PZL P.6 at the Paris Air Show. Flying the P.6, Orliński participated National Air Races in Cleveland from 29 August - 7 September 1931, which were outstanding success for him. Flying the PZL.19 he took part in the Challenge 1932 contest, but had to withdraw due to illness. On 28 June 1934 he set a world speed record for radial engined fighters of 414 km/h, flying the PZL P.24. During this time he survived several crashes and emergency parachute jumps.

By the way he had his own opinion about parachute:" If you don't have parachute when you need it, then you will never need it again."

 

Other intersting fact - when flying PZL.37 he won a dogfight with Seversky P-35, which was making a advertise tour on Europe.

 

In summer 1939 he was in England testing a planes bought by Poland, Hurricane, Spitfire and Battle. After his last fully tested plane in Poland was a PZL.50 fighter prototype, and P.11g Kobuz.

 

After the outbreak of World War II and German invasion on Poland, he volunteered for the Polish Army. 5 Septmrber he evacuted P.11g form Warsaw to Lviv. On 8 September 1939 he was sent to Romania in prepartion to receive British-built fighters. Via Yugoslavia, Italy and France he got to Great Britain, where the remnants of the Polish Air Force was serving. Because of his age he could not be a fighter pilot and became an instructor, also his earlier experience with British planes was priceless when comes to learn other. Interesting fact, 15.01.1940 Dutch company Koolhoven by Polish embassy sent a proposition to hire him as a test pilot (Orlińsk iestes Koolhoven FK.58 in 1939), but he refused and decided to stay in England and help war efforts. 

 

In 1943 his dreams become real, he was appointment to No. 305 Polish Bomber Squadron, flying the de Havilland Mosquito fighter-bomber. From 1 August 1944 to 31 January 1945 Wing Commander Orliński was the commander of No. 305 Squadron. He flew 49 operational sorties, mostly at night. Orliński was involved in most difficult missions.

 

First combat flight: 8 February 1944 - bombing targets in France

3 March - his plane was damaged by German Flak when attacking V-1 positions, plane returned on one engine.

Soon after that on his own will he retuned to bombing targets in France. When attacking target one by one at very low altitude, one bomb dropped earlier exploded with delay, and so cockpit was full of earth from explosion. After returning to base, He gave French pilots a bucket of their soil.

Other unusual mission was to prevent a execution of prisoners in Lille. He attacked s a 4th plane - 30 French prisoners died, 50 was cough be Germans, 200 escaped, and 70% of execution squad was killed.

Later he performed missions during D-Day and after

31 August 1944 – 6 mosquito with a task to destroy fuel tanks in (with capacity of 13 millions litres) Nomexy.

French site with photos

 

BP%2B%25282%2529.jpg

 

10 November squadron moved to Epinoy in France.

 

More is listed in mentioned article.

 

Between 1 August 1944 and 31 January 1945 he commanded No. 305 Squadron. From 1 February 1945 until the end of the war in Europe he was rested from combat.

There is interesting paragraph in article from secret  list to Command, when he strongly oppose a opinion that flying Mosquito is a walk

 

Oh, crew of Orliński and Lemieszonek was called "one hundred year crew) because their sum up age (in reality it was around 80).

 

Having handed over the command, he was posted to air transport service. From 5 till 23 March 1945 he was on a specialist course in the School of Air Transport RAF in Netheravon. After the course, he became a liaison officer to 46 Group Training Command HQ, and remained at that post till 20 February 1947. During his career he flew air on 92 types of aircraft in the air to spend seven thousand hours. In 1948 he left for the South Africa Union, and then to Canada. Till April 1967 he was working in De Havilland Aircraft Plant, and later in the Canadian Corps of Commisionaires in Toronto (till September 1980). He died on 28 February 1992 in Mississaunga. The funeral urn was committed to the earth on the Holy Family Cemetery in Wroclaw.

 

During his career he flew 92 aircraft types and spent some 7,000 hours in air.

 

In his last will and testament donated part of his wealth to create a trust fund in his name. This trust fund is administered by the Canadian Polish Millennium Fund.According to Col. Orliński’s wishes, part of the trust fund was specifically set up as a scholarship for training young Polish pilots or Canadian pilots of Polish descent - and that's only 10% part, other fund are also for example  for blind kids.

 

His decorations include

* Silver Cross of the Virtuti Militari

* Cross of Valour and three Bars

* Gold Cross of Merit and Bar

* Legion of Honour, Chevalier (France)

* Order of the Rising Sun, Jun class (Japan)

* Order of the Crown of Romania, Officer

* Distinguished Flying Cross (United Kingdom)

* Air Force Medal and three Bars

 

And last but not least, a photo of original Order of the Rising Sun, Jun class given to Orliński

 

1526715_831298406897724_8916087401982782

 

Source

Edited by Botan
  • Upvote 11
medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.... skipped again.

 
My point was that your not the only country, there are several countries that have not been done yet (even after being on the list for quite a while already) ;/
 
I have a new ace to suggest which flew both Spitfire's and Tempests, I am referring to flight lietenant Jan G.F. Jongbloed. He flew Spitfire XIV's in 322 squadron (with Rudy Burgwal) and got then moved to 222 squadron (flying Tempest MkV's) as flight lietenant.
 
He destroyed 1 Fw190 and 1 V-1 in the Tempest MkV but his squadron was mainly focussed on ground support in preparation (and in support) of the invasion. There even is gun camera footage of Jongbloed attacking ground targets -> http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/1060036759
 
He destroyed 7 + 2 shared V-1's1 before when flying the Spitfire MkXIV with 322 squadron which means his total is 1 aircraft, 10 V-1's and a lot of ground support. The interesting part about his time at 322 squadron is that he even got a V-1 kill in the the same Spitfire XIV (NH718) that Rudy Burgwal used to get his Ace in a Day status (on V-1's).
 
-- Space reserve for when I identify his exact aircraft --
 
Attached Pilot's Report about the Jongbloed's Fw190 kill, taken from http://www.wwiiaircraftperformance.org/tempest/temptest.html:
 
 

F/L G.F.J. Jongbloed of No. 222 Squadron recorded on his Combat Report of 25 March 1945:

      I was flying Blue 3 at approx 9000 feet in the CLOPPENBURG area when aircraft were reported at 12 o'clock above. A few seconds later I sighted 4 FW190's (short nose) at approx 7,000 feet crossing from our starboard to port, diving in NW direction.
      Blue 1 (F/L Varley) turned to port after the first enemy aircraft and I pulled up over his starboard side to cover his tail against another FW190 which I observed to be following him. This enemy aircraft however then pulled up behind me and we started doing tight turns, gradually losing height. The advantage was at first, slightly with the FW190, which advantage he gradually lost through flicking near the ground which compelled him to slacken his rate of turn. We were now approx 500 feet from the ground. I pulled up and, diving down again gave a one second burst from approx 300 yards with 1½ rings deflection, observing strikes on the tail. I gave two more burst head on, strikes being observed during the second burst. The FW190 flew past me and, flicking over, one and a half rolls, dived straight into the ground at a position which I pin-point at V 8656. The combat was witnessed by Red 4 (F/O Donald) and by Blue 4 (F/O Roberts).

 

Sources:

 

1 Page 86 of Andrew Thomas. V1 Flying Bomb Aces. 2013. Osprey Publishing

---

 

PS: This guy is insanely hard to track down, I would appreciate any help (if someone is willing). Furthermore, I will keep updating this post with any (new) information that I might dig up.

Edited by Tarskin
  • Upvote 1
medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 
My point was that your not the only country, there are several countries that have not been done yet (even after being on the list for quite a while already) ;/
 
I have a new ace to suggest which flew both Spitfire's and Tempests, I am referring to flight lietenant Jan G.F. Jongbloed. He flew Spitfire XIV's in 322 squadron (with Rudy Burgwal) and got then moved to 222 squadron (flying Tempest MkV's) as flight lietenant.

 

Now I'm a little wiser about Spitfire Mk XIV version.

 

In game we have

- Spitfire XIVc (c wing typne and high back) - first which goes into production

- Spitfire XIVe (e wing type) with low back (bubbletop) in production or service since march 1945 if I remember correctly.

 

Between those variants Spitfire XIVe (e wing type) but high back was produced - this variant is not in game.

And that's shot down one of pilots I found.

 

James Harry Lacey

9_67.jpg

 

It's a variant XIVe  with high back, which is not in game.... What a pity.

 

lacey_YB-A_1.jpg

Edited by Botan
medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmm, I always thought that the 322 used the higback XIVc's and the picture that you showed above looks like a regular XIVc highback to me. Just compare it with the picture of the XIVc of R. Burgwal below, note that small protrusion outside of the inner hispano gun. That protrusion is the second set of Hispano's, proving that the wing is a C wing and not an E wing (check the bottom picture for C and E wing comparison).
 
sp25.jpg

Structural picture of C-wing
 
spitfire-xiv-wing_small.jpg

Structural picture of E-wing
 
gun-installation-e-wing.jpg

Note that the protrusion is smaller and 'flatter' on an E-wing and both the picture that you showed (and the XIVc reconstruction (of R. Burgwal) from 322 RAF squadron) have the longer rounder protrusion, thus proving them to be the first XIVc's with a high back (currently in game as the premium spitfire XIV). Edited by Tarskin
medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are wrong... because the wing in the picture (scheme) that you show is quite clearly a C-wing (The protrusion is too long, the cap is too round and the guns are in the wrong order -> on an E-wing the browning is on the interior side and the Hispano on the exterior side, see pictures below). Heck, even the cover of Thomas, 'Griffon Spitfire Aces' shows a proper E-wing on it ;)
 
Structural overview of E-wing (showing that the browning MG is on the interior side)
 
209096d1344748279t-1-48-spitfire-mk-xvi-
 
Structural overview of non-clipped E-wing (just to prevent people from thinking that it has to do with the wing clipping)
 
MK1Xcportwing.jpg
 
 
Picture of an short wing MkIX with E-wing (to again illustrate the browning being the interior gun)
 
supermarine-spitfire-mk-lfixe-clipped-wi

Cover of the 'Griffon Spitfire Aces' (note the guns)
 

9781846032981-th2.jpg

 

I will also cite a passage from http://spitfiresite.com/2010/04/concise-guide-to-spitfire-wing-types.html/3

 

 

E type

A new wing was introduced in early 1944 – type E. Structurally unchanged from the C wing, the outer machine gun ports were eliminated. Although the outer machine gun bays were retained, their access doors were devoid of empty shell case ports and shell deflectors.

 

The inner gun bays allowed for two weapon fits two 20 mm Hispano Mk II cannon with 120 rounds/gun in the outer bays and two American .50 calibre M2 Browning machine guns, with 250 rounds per gun in the inner bays. Alternatively, four 20 mm Hispano cannon with 120 rounds per gun could be carried as per original C-wing production standard.

The cannon in the E wing was slightly relocated, positioned further to the rear in its bay. Consequently, the protruding portion of the barrel was shorter and almost entirely enclosed by a new cigar-shaped fairing. Also, the overwing blister was more narrow and a little deeper than the corresponding feature of the C wing.

An interesting curiosity is that several C-wing Spitfires LF Mk. IX of No. 485 (New Zealand) Squadron were converted to carry the Hispanos and .50 Brownings just before D-Day.

Edited by Tarskin
medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How can you refer to picture of Lacey plane, if I shown no photo were canons are not visible? I hope you on't trust a colous shcmae form net I posted, sometimes people doing them do not into details of version.

 

Spitfires from his unit

 

20_13_04_13_5_25_26.jpg

 

By the way, i wonder about one thing

 

The inner gun bays allowed for two weapon fits two 20 mm Hispano Mk II cannon with 120 rounds/gun in the outer bays and two American .50 calibre M2 Browning machine guns, with 250 rounds per gun in the inner bays. Alternatively, four 20 mm Hispano cannon with 120 rounds per gun could be carried as per original C-wing production standard.

 

I wonder, if Browning and Hispano could be swapped in wing.

Edited by Botan
medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They couldn't be swapped because of the layout/arrangement of ammo feed mechanisms (in an E-wing). The C-wing however was modular such that it could have the Hispano or Browning in either bay.

 

I was referring to the colour scheme indeed, as it was the only thing in the post where I could see them. The real life picture in your first post was taken at such an angle that the weaponry was not visible.

 

The photograph in your last post (just above this one) does add more credit to an E-wing since you can't see what is on the inside of the outer gun.

 

I assume that the scheme was not published in the book then?

 

---

 

PS: I would add this picture myself if I were you to illustrate the skin:

 

GingerLaceyXIVe.jpg

Edited by Tarskin
medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume that the scheme was not published in the book then?

 

No, it's not from Osprey book, random from internet.

Edited by Botan
medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, it's not from Osprey book, random from interent.

 

That explains that then :P

medal medal medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I-16 type 10 is coming to us, so it's time for Spanish Civil War Ace

It was hard to decide which SCW ace could be presented. Well, other forum members can propose their idea :)

 

mexico_people_tarazona.jpg

 

 

Ace: Francisco Tarazona Toran,

Nationality: Mexican (Spanish origin)

Service: Spanish Republican Air Force

Aircraft: I-16

Variant: Type 10

Serial Number: CM-193

Time Frame: 1938-1939

Approved by Biographer:

 

34239193259771733027.png

 

This aircraft was formerly flown by high-scoring ace Jose Maria Bravo Fernandez. Indeed, the fighter was photographed with Bravo sat beside it being shaved, and later with Tarazona leaning on the tail. These were two of the most widely circulated images of Republican aces to emerge from the civil war. The 1-16 displays a double-six domino on its rudder. Tarazona claimed his last success in this machine on 30 December 1938 when he downed a Bf 109. On 7 February 1939 he was lucky to escape with his life when 'CM-193' was attacked by Legion Condor aircraft while he was attempting to takeoff from Vilajuiga. Although Tarazona maintained that 'CM-193' was destroyed in the incident, other sources contradict that assertion. Historian Juan Arraez believes the aircraft was in airworthy condition when it was captured by Nationalist troops, while Thomas Sarbaugh says that contemporary French newspapers reported that Moscas 'CM-193', 'CM-244' and 'CM-202' managed to land near Gironde on 5 February 1939.

 

Although Francisco Tarazona Toran was born in Mexico City on 21 June 1915, his parents were Spanish and they returned home to settle in Valencia when he was still a child. Working as a draughtsman when the civil war commenced, Tarazona soon volunteered to serve the Republican cause as a pilot. On 17 January 1937 he sailed for the USSR on board the SS Ciudad de Cddiz and subsequently joined the flying course at Kirovabad. Returning to Spain in June, Tarazona attended the Escuela de Alta Velocidad at El Carmoli and was promoted to sargento piloto in April. He then became a member of the 2a Patrulla of the recently established escuadrilla de Moscas, led by Soviet pilot Boris Smirnov.
In August 1937 Tarazona flew with his unit from Alcala de Henares to La Albericia to reinforce the fighter force on the Northern front. There, he was quick to demonstrate his skill as a fighter pilot, downing a CR.32 on the 17th of that month and a Bf 109 on the 27th. However, on 13 October Tarazona was himself shot down near Gijon. Taking to his parachute, he landed in a tree in enemy-held territory and made his way to Valencia, via France, to recover from his wounds.
In March 1938 Tarazona was posted to the la Escuadrilla of Grupo de Moscas N° 21, based at Liria airfield and subsequently at Caspe for thedefence of the Aragon front during the Nationalist offensive. Having claimed a share in the destruction of a CR.32 with this unit on 15 March, Tarazona was posted to the recently re-formed 3a Escuadrilla -the Seis doble of Grupo N° 21 de Moscas - and appointed patrulla CO on 10 April. He duly participated in the campaign in Levante while based at Sagunto and Camporrobles, claiming four and three shared victories and one unconfirmed success from 25 Aprilthrough to 24 August.

 

During the latter month capitan Jose Maria Bravo was promoted to deputy grupo CO, and Tarazona - then still a sargento — assumed command of the 3a Escuadrilla, which he led in the aerial engagements during the battle of the Ebro. He was promoted to teniente in September (having been credited with one and one shared CR.32 victories that month) and confirmed as escuadrilla CO. In October Tarazona claimed one and three shared victories, followed by another success in November, but on 8 December he was injured when his Mosca ('CM-249') suffered engine failure while taking off from Vails. After a short spell in hospital, Tarazona returned to Catalonia to fly Mosca 'CM-193'. He claimed his last success in this machine on 30 December when he downed a Bf 109. On 7 February 1939 Tarazona was lucky to escape with his life when 'CM-193' was attacked by Legion Condor aircraft while he wasattempting to take off from Vilajuiga.

As Republican resistance crumbled the high-scoring ace sought refuge in France. Thanks to his Mexican nationality, Tarazona was able to return to Mexico and join his family there. Francisco Tarazona Toran later found employment as a captain with the airline Mexicana, flying Douglas DC-3s, DC-4s and DC-6s, de Havilland Comet 4s and Boeing 727s. After retirement from the flightdeck, he served as an air service inspector at the airline's headquarters at Mexico City international airport, before becoming operations manager for the Servicios Aereos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad. Tarazona then established the Francisco Tarazona Flying School, which he ran until he retired to Cuernavaca. He died there on 1 July 1988.

 

Francisco Tarazona logged a total of 23,300 flying hours and was awarded the Emilio Carranza medals for reaching 10,000 and 15,000 commercial flying hours. He was also a successful author, displaying a meticulous, precise style in numerous articles published in magazines and newspapers like Helice, the magazine of the Asociacion Sindical de Pilotos Aviadores (ASPA - Pilots' Trade Union). Tarazona also wrote two books, the first, entitled Sangre en el cielo (Blood in the Sky) and published by Costa Amic in Mexico City in 1958, was an account of his experiences in the civil war. It was also published in Spain by Editorial San Martin in 1974 — while the country was still ruled by General Franco — under the title Yo fuipiloto de caza rojo {I was a Red Fighter Piloi). His second book, El despertar de las dguilas {Eagles Awake), detailed the history of the ASPA, of which Tarazona was an enthusiastic member and office holder.
In his book Blood in the Sky, Tarazona stated that he had scored six individual aerial victories and some shared with other pilots during the civil war. The author interviewed Francisco Tarazona during a visit to Spain in 1988 and, after checking documentary sources and consulting renowned historians such as American Thomas Sarbaugh, he believes that Francisco Tarazona Toran scored at least eight aerial victories and another eight shared with Eduardo Claudin Moncada, Antonio Calvo Velasco, Jose Maria Bravo Fernandez and Manuel Montilla y Montilla.

 

 

His scored kills

 

17/8/37
CR.32
27/8/37
Bf 109
15/3/38
CR.32 (half-share)
25/4/38
He 111
11/5/38
Bf 109
10/6/38
Bf 109 (half-share)
14/6/38
Bf 109 (half-share)
4/7/38
SM.79
19/7/38
CR.32 (half-share)
14/8/38
He 111 (unconfirmed)
24/8/38
CR.32
21/9/38
CR.32
22/9/38
CR.32 (half-share)
16/10/38
2 CR.32s (credited to patrulla)
30/10/38
CR.32
31/10/38
He 111 (credited to patrulla)
7/11/38
Do 17 (set on fire)
30/12/38
Bf 109

 

Text taken from  'Spanish Republican Aces' by Rafael Lopez

Edited by Botan
  • Upvote 5
medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK to me, although some of the air victory claims do not match with enemy records - for starters Italians (Aviazione Legionaria) did not lost any Savoia S.M. 79 in air combat situation against enemy fighters during Spanish Civil War (although some were damaged by combat). There are also 3 full + 2 shares against Bf 109 in the claim list, but of these only one + one shared are possible. When it comes two full and one shared claims against He 111, only one full claim is possible.

I have the Spanish Republican Aces book, but I think that the author could have mentioned something about overclaiming. This regards specially the claims on Bf 109 which were wildy exaggerated by Republican pilots. But OK, everyone overclaimed and air victory records as such are always more or less open to doubt. For example in one nice day of December 1936 the boys of Legion Condor had a great fiesta with five enemy SB bombers shot down, but the Spanish Republican records have not confirmed any of these 5 claims.

Edited by hanwind

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

So, I-16 type 10 is coming to us, so it's time for Spanish Civil War Ace

It was hard to decide which SCW ace could be presented. Well, other forum members can propose their idea :)

 

mexico_people_tarazona.jpg

 

 

Ace: Francisco Tarazona Toran,

Nationality: Mexican (Spanish origin)

Service: Spanish Republican Air Force

Aircraft: I-16

Variant: Type 10

Serial Number: CM-193

Time Frame: 1938-1939

Approved by Biographer:

 

34239193259771733027.png

 

 

Although Francisco Tarazona Toran was born in Mexico City on 21 June 1915, his parents were Spanish and they returned home to settle in Valencia when he was still a child. Working as a draughtsman when the civil war commenced, Tarazona soon volunteered to serve the Republican cause as a pilot. On 17 January 1937 he sailed for the USSR on board the SS Ciudad de Cddiz and subsequently joined the flying course at Kirovabad. Returning to Spain in June, Tarazona attended the Escuela de Alta Velocidad at El Carmoli and was promoted to sargento piloto in April. He then became a member of the 2a Patrulla of the recently established escuadrilla de Moscas, led by Soviet pilot Boris Smirnov.
In August 1937 Tarazona flew with his unit from Alcala de Henares to La Albericia to reinforce the fighter force on the Northern front. There, he was quick to demonstrate his skill as a fighter pilot, downing a CR.32 on the 17th of that month and a Bf 109 on the 27th. However, on 13 October Tarazona was himself shot down near Gijon. Taking to his parachute, he landed in a tree in enemy-held territory and made his way to Valencia, via France, to recover from his wounds.
In March 1938 Tarazona was posted to the la Escuadrilla of Grupo de Moscas N° 21, based at Liria airfield and subsequently at Caspe for thedefence of the Aragon front during the Nationalist offensive. Having claimed a share in the destruction of a CR.32 with this unit on 15 March, Tarazona was posted to the recently re-formed 3a Escuadrilla -the Seis doble of Grupo N° 21 de Moscas - and appointed patrulla CO on 10 April. He duly participated in the campaign in Levante while based at Sagunto and Camporrobles, claiming four and three shared victories and one unconfirmed success from 25 Aprilthrough to 24 August.

 

During the latter month capitan Jose Maria Bravo was promoted to deputy grupo CO, and Tarazona - then still a sargento — assumed command of the 3a Escuadrilla, which he led in the aerial engagements during the battle of the Ebro. He was promoted to teniente in September (having been credited with one and one shared CR.32 victories that month) and confirmed as escuadrilla CO. In October Tarazona claimed one and three shared victories, followed by another success in November, but on 8 December he was injured when his Mosca ('CM-249') suffered engine failure while taking off from Vails. After a short spell in hospital, Tarazona returned to Catalonia to fly Mosca 'CM-193'. He claimed his last success in this machine on 30 December when he downed a Bf 109. On 7 February 1939 Tarazona was lucky to escape with his life when 'CM-193' was attacked by Legion Condor aircraft while he wasattempting to take off from Vilajuiga.

As Republican resistance crumbled the high-scoring ace sought refuge in France. Thanks to his Mexican nationality, Tarazona was able to return to Mexico and join his family there. Francisco Tarazona Toran later found employment as a captain with the airline Mexicana, flying Douglas DC-3s, DC-4s and DC-6s, de Havilland Comet 4s and Boeing 727s. After retirement from the flightdeck, he served as an air service inspector at the airline's headquarters at Mexico City international airport, before becoming operations manager for the Servicios Aereos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad. Tarazona then established the Francisco Tarazona Flying School, which he ran until he retired to Cuernavaca. He died there on 1 July 1988.

 

Francisco Tarazona logged a total of 23,300 flying hours and was awarded the Emilio Carranza medals for reaching 10,000 and 15,000 commercial flying hours. He was also a successful author, displaying a meticulous, precise style in numerous articles published in magazines and newspapers like Helice, the magazine of the Asociacion Sindical de Pilotos Aviadores (ASPA - Pilots' Trade Union). Tarazona also wrote two books, the first, entitled Sangre en el cielo (Blood in the Sky) and published by Costa Amic in Mexico City in 1958, was an account of his experiences in the civil war. It was also published in Spain by Editorial San Martin in 1974 — while the country was still ruled by General Franco — under the title Yo fuipiloto de caza rojo {I was a Red Fighter Piloi). His second book, El despertar de las dguilas {Eagles Awake), detailed the history of the ASPA, of which Tarazona was an enthusiastic member and office holder.
In his book Blood in the Sky, Tarazona stated that he had scored six individual aerial victories and some shared with other pilots during the civil war. The author interviewed Francisco Tarazona during a visit to Spain in 1988 and, after checking documentary sources and consulting renowned historians such as American Thomas Sarbaugh, he believes that Francisco Tarazona Toran scored at least eight aerial victories and another eight shared with Eduardo Claudin Moncada, Antonio Calvo Velasco, Jose Maria Bravo Fernandez and Manuel Montilla y Montilla.

 

 

His scored kills

 

17/8/37
CR.32
27/8/37
Bf 109
15/3/38
CR.32 (half-share)
25/4/38
He 111
11/5/38
Bf 109
10/6/38
Bf 109 (half-share)
14/6/38
Bf 109 (half-share)
4/7/38
SM.79
19/7/38
CR.32 (half-share)
14/8/38
He 111 (unconfirmed)
24/8/38
CR.32
21/9/38
CR.32
22/9/38
CR.32 (half-share)
16/10/38
2 CR.32s (credited to patrulla)
30/10/38
CR.32
31/10/38
He 111 (credited to patrulla)
7/11/38
Do 17 (set on fire)
30/12/38
Bf 109

 

Text taken from  'Spanish Republican Aces' by Rafael Lopez

 





Awesome!! This is one of the best news I've heard for the last months!
I like that one, although I would go for José María Bravo instead.

In any case, and taking into account that you usually show a user-made skin along with the article, I have to suggest this one: http://live.warthunder.com/post/64352/en/ (video preview in it, too)

I guess we could remake it to fit the I-16 type 10 though.

2014_10_25_00005.jpg


I'd love to see this skin or any similar one in the game instead of just a user skin, but that's another story :)


Thanks for the idea!

Edited by Olomez

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks or detailed information handwind :)

 

I was thinking  alsoabout Manuel Zarauza Clavero, but details of his claims and post SCW serviceseems to be more unknown.

 

 

I like that one, although I would go for José María Bravo instead.

Jose Maria Bravo Fernandez like for me is a very good choice too. Osprey book have a profile for his "CM-249", I think you also can make a filled form for him, it's always a more possibilities to wasco to chose from :)

  • Upvote 1
medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks or detailed information handwind :)

 

I was thinking  alsoabout Manuel Zarauza Clavero, but details of his claims and post SCW serviceseems to be more unknown.

 

Jose Maria Bravo Fernandez like for me is a very good choice too. Osprey book have a profile for his "CM-249", I think you also can make a filled form for him, it's always a more possibilities to wasco to chose from :)

 

Also José María Bravo is probably the best known ace here in Spain (I'm Spanish), that's why I think it would be an awesome surprise for the Spanish community :)

Oh, and I'd like to ask you something, maybe you can find it out. In the new I-16 devblog post they show a picture of the Republican Ishak with no red stripes on the wings... and that's strange. Why would Gaijin do that?
Will they change it? Is it the final version?

I'll copy my reply for you: [spoiler]This is my most anticipated aircraft since release!!! I'm so happy :)

BUT why no red stripes on the wings on the republican skin? Why Gaijin? :( That's strange.

MOSCA.jpg

Polikarpov_I16.gif

Polikarpov_I_16_Spain_clipped.jpg

75_28.jpg

75_6.jpg


Why, Gaijin?

shot_2014_11_28_10_06_14.jpg[/spoiler]

Edited by Olomez
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also José María Bravo is probably the best known ace here in Spain (I'm Spanish), that's why I think it would be an awesome surprise for the Spanish community :)

Oh, and I'd like to ask you something, maybe you can find it out. In the new I-16 devblog post they show a picture of the Republican Ishak with no red stripes on the wings... and that's strange. Why would Gaijin do that?
Will they change it? Is it the final version?

I'll copy my reply for you: [spoiler]This is my most anticipated aircraft since release!!! I'm so happy :)

BUT why no red stripes on the wings on the republican skin? Why Gaijin? :( That's strange.

MOSCA.jpg

Polikarpov_I16.gif

Polikarpov_I_16_Spain_clipped.jpg

75_28.jpg

75_6.jpg


Why, Gaijin?

shot_2014_11_28_10_06_14.jpg[/spoiler]

 

So, will you fill a form for José María Bravo or should I do this for you? :)

 

About those wings, I guess that's a mistake, may be not final.

 

When Dev sever appear, you can just made a bug report about this. Such bug report need at least two historical sources to be valid. If you need a help with that just PM me when dev sever will be open, I may drop some books there.

  • Upvote 2
medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, will you fill a form for José María Bravo or should I do this for you? :)

 

About those wings, I guess that's a mistake, may be not final.

 

When Dev sever appear, you can just made a bug report about this. Such bug report need at least two historical sources to be valid. If you need a help with that just PM me when dev sever will be open, I may drop some books there.

I'd like to do it, sure! But where should I? Is there a standard form for it?

Yep, I'm looking forward to seeing it when Dev server comes up.

Again, Botan, thank you! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's explained  on the first page on the topic, and you just post it here.

 

[spoiler]

There is now a form which needs filling in. Here's an example of an ace who has already been featured:

 

 

Ace: RJ Cork

Nationality: British

Service: British Royal Navy

Aircraft: Hawker Sea Hurricane

Variant: Mk.1b

Serial Number: AF955 (7-E)

Time Frame: May 1942

Approved by Biographer:

 

So, to explain:

Ace - name your suggestion

Nationality - this is the country of the ace's origin, NOT the tech tree his aircraft is in

Service - nationality and if he was army, navy or air force

Aircraft - the aircraft you suggest would make the most appropriate skin for the feature

Variant - the exact variant. Note that, unlike this old example, the aircraft and variant now have to be the exact aircraft already featured in War Thunder

Serial Number - the ace's aircraft's registration number, plus any other additional markings you feel are worth mentioning. EDIT: This is only an absolute requirement if the serial number was visible on the aircraft in question. For example, on the vast majority of British and US aircraft this would be a requirement, whereas on some Soviet aircraft a more simple 'White 33' or equivalent will be sufficient.

Time frame - when this ace flew this aircraft

Approved by biographer - that's me! I will approve your suggestion based on three things: 1 - the form is filled in correctly, 2 - I believe there is enough information on this ace for me to write an article on them, 3 - the ace was not what Gaijin would term as a 'controversial' character (i.e an ardent follower of National Socialism etc)

Edit - The section for 'Approval by artist' and 'Final Approval' has now been removed. The Master List here is for discussion between biographer, artists and WT HQ and so final approval is often variable and can have significant delays.

[/spoiler]

medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ace: José María Bravo Fernández-Hermosa (known as José María Bravo)

Nationality: Spanish

Service: F.A.R.E. (Fuerzas Aéreas de la República Española / Spanish Republican Air Force)

Aircraft: Polikarpov I-16

Variant: type 10

Serial Number: CM-193 (plus the "Seis Doble" / "Double Six" domino piece emblem)

Time Frame: July-November 1938 (during the Battle of the Ebro)

Approved by Biographer:
 


bravo_1555783c.jpg

1978_POLIKARPOV_I_16.jpg





As for the skin, I've just made a couple of shots that I think show pretty well the quality of it (click to enlarge)
 

[url=http://postimg.org/image/wt99g3ox1/full/]2014_12_05_00003.jpg[/url]
 
[url=http://postimg.org/image/819n8v7qd/full/]2014_12_05_00006.jpg[/url]
Edited by Olomez
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frank Tinker is rather controversial character - he came to Spain as mercenary pilot who was rewarded with extra bonus for every downed enemy plane. He claimed to have shot down 19 planes and said that Spaniards did not confirm his air victories to save money - the 19 air victory claim was very exaggerated as well as some other claims which he made in his book Some Still live. Some of his claims are controversial - it is not sure if he was the first ever pilot to be credited with Bf 109 (B) "kill". There is a competing Soviet claim on Bf 109 at that time near the same location, so we are left to guess who was the first ever pilot to shoot down a Bf 109. Could have been Tinker or not.

Tinker became also alcoholized and committed suicide - quite sad end. But one must admit that he was really a colourful character!

When it comes to his planes, he flew I-15 Chato and I-16 type 5 "Mosca" (but not type 10 "Supermosca"!). 

I consider the suggested Spanish guys as better candidates to represent an interesting Spanish Republican ace. They flew also with the very best that Republicans had ("Supermosca" with 4 mg). 

Any chance for some Italian/Spanish Nationalist Ace of SCW - is Fiat CR 32 a "wrong plane"? The very top ace of SCW was a Spaniard Joaquín García Morato with the famous Fiat "3-51":

1852846b-6058-4fae-89e8-12dfa65ec788_zps
 

Edited by hanwind
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, "Pappy" Boyington, had problem with alcohol too. But I agree, Tinker may be too controversial.

 

Any chance for some Italian/Spanish Nationalist Ace of SCW - is Fiat CR 32 a "wrong plane"? The very top ace of SCW was a Spaniard Joaquín García Morato with the famous Fiat "3-51":

 

Well, without Fiat in game we can only have then as a Ace profile. I hope soon Fiat CR.32 will appear in game.

Other interesting Fiat pilot is Belgian pilot Rodolphe De Hemricourt de Grunne.

 

Once I found a Italian SCW ace with G.50, but it was a early version with closed canopy.

medal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...