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EternalAutotaku

[wiki contest] Critical Damage Landings

Introduction

A aircraft is only as good as its pilot... but what happens when your aircraft is not responding at its maximum efficiency.Pilot, it is time that you learn how fly and land a plane that has taken critical damage. This article will cover everything from wing skin damage to stabilizer control failure in independent topics. Many of these damage models and their counter actions at the time of approach happen together, if this is the case you should be able to use these skills in co-operation with one another adjusting speed and approach angle respectively. We hope that you never need to use this training, Pilot, but it would be best if you knew should the situation present itself. While the sections including some kind of damage and control loss are hard to simulate it is advised that aircraft new to the pilot are taken out in a test flight to practise ditching, retracted gear landings and un-powered landings as each aircraft behaves differently from others.

 

  • Landing with wing skin damage
  • Landing with flap damage
  • Landing with aileron loss
  • Landing with rudder loss
  • Landing with elevator loss
  • Landing without landing gear/Ditching
  • Landing without engine power

Landing with Wing Skin Damage

Wing skin damage can be a silent killer in the world of War Thunder, causing you to loose turning ability during combat hampering your ability to engage enemies effectively. But it can spell disaster on the approach to an airfield or aircraft carrier as well. As the aircraft approaches the airfield you will be be loosing speed to avoid overloading your landing gear and deploying flaps to increase lift. At these low speeds however the damage to the wing will cause that wing to loose lift, effectively making that wing stall at low enough speeds. If this is not corrected the aircraft to roll over onto its side and crash, wing tip first.

The best way to combat this scenario is to keep your approach angle as shallow as possible and have your speed relatively high. Generally aircraft will land at speeds lower than 190km/h with flaps extended and engine running at 30%-40%; a aircraft with damaged wings should aim to have speeds no lower than 190km/h, this will keep the lift levels over the damaged wing acceptable and the plane will not roll much more than 10'.

 

Landing with Flap Damage

Flap damage will cause drag on the landing approach, the plane will rotate about its vertical axis. The rudder can be used to correct this in all but the worst of damage situations, in which case it is prudent to approach landing as if the plane was suffering wing skin damage (often the two go hand in hand which can increase the difficulty of the approach). Keeping a low, long, high speed approach to the airfield is the way to go about handling the aircraft as you may not be able to deploy flaps to increase your lift at lower speeds.

 

Landing with Aileron Loss

Aileron loss is often catastrophic during combat flight, the plane will lock its orientation at the moment of control loss often resulting in a irrecoverable dive. However there are certain situations where the plane may right itself after loosing control, often where the roll was not very pronounced at the time of control loss. The roll can be corrected slowly using the rudder, unchecked the rudders' movement will roll the plane without much effort. As you will not be able to correct a turn quickly you should ensure that you are lined up with the runway well ahead of schedule, using the rudder to make minor adjustments to your flight path once lined up. Aside from this extended approach, landing should not be much different than any other landing, speed is not a factor unless the aircraft is suffering either flap of wing skin damage, in which case, you should approach as if you were only suffering from that specific issue as the distance that you will be covering negates the issues of having no ailerons.
 

Landing with Rudder Loss

Rudder loss behaves and impacts your flight in the same way as aileron loss, but the problems will be less pronounced and easier to deal with as rolling the aircraft with the ailerons is easier than with the rudder. Hence you can afford to make the approach a shorter than that with damaged ailerons as course corrections will be easier to implement and over-corrections will be easier to address.

 

Landing with Elevator Loss

Landing without the elevator is one of the most strenuous exercises that any pilot will have to accomplish. Everything that you do on approach can cause you to loose or gain speed; which in turn, without the intervention of the elevator, will cause your aircraft to pitch down or up respectively. Being close to the ground, this is a dangerous situation to be in. The only way to keep you aircraft in the air and relatively level is to use your engine power. The aircraft, under constant 100% power, will describe a oscillating vertical line. As the aircraft noses up it gains altitude, its speed decreases and it looses lift, eventually it will nose back over and begin loose altitude for increasing speed and increasing lift and the process will start all over again. To address this you should manage the throttle to control the speed, lift and altitude it will gain and loose. Decreasing the throttle will cause it nose over faster or loose more altitude if it is at a nose down attitude. Increasing or decreasing the throttle during the change from attitudes will level out its oscillation. Unfortunately, the final stages of your landing will affect that flight model that you have been used to on your approach. Deploying the landing gear will increase the drag, meaning that the throttle must be increased to accommodate this. Also of note, the deployment of the flaps will increase the lift the wings generate, no matter how level the flight path is this will cause a extreme nose up attitude under "normal" power in this situation. Therefore it would be best to deploy your aircraft into its final landing configuration early so that you can manage the flight model in this configuration and not cause any sudden disturbances in a critical situation, either too low or too slow.

 

Landing without Landing Gear/Ditching

Landing without your under carriage extended is quite common after your aircraft has gone through a intense fire, which can physically burn your landing gear from the inside, or after taking critical cannon round damage. Either way landing a crippled aircraft in this state is a high difficulty skill, at least in such a way that the aircraft does not sustain more damage causing it to become unrepairable. The trick is to "bottom out" the aircraft on landing, approaching the ground as slowly as possible while keeping the under belly in as parallel a orientation as possible to the ground. Obviously the angle of attack of the wings will change from plane to plane but as long as the belly impacts on a flat the structural integrity of the fuselage should be preserved. Come in to the runway and level off your decent at about 20m off the runway surface and reduce power to your engines, slowly raising the planes nose until its belly is level with the ground, but keeping enough power that your aircraft does not stall or descend too fast. If you land properly without the gear you will only suffer propeller bending. If you over angle you risk loosing the tail section, which can be fatally critical to bombers with the impact to personnel, while under angling can result in a high speed lean on one of the wings or even engines in multi engined craft which will often lead to fire and irrecoverable loss of the aircraft. Ditching, while due to more recent up dates does not seem to save the aircraft as often, is still a effective test of skill and will allow you to save the crew. You must be going slower than on a usual gear less landing as impact with water is often very forceful and can tear a aircraft apart and it is often prudent to angle slightly more than usual, keeping the engine blocks out of the water until you have sufficiently slowed down.

 

Landing without Engine Power

None of the aircraft you will pilot were meant to fly without powered assistance. In the desperate situation where power is no longer available to the aircraft the pilot must engage in the most intense balancing act every to be forced upon a pilot. That is the balance of horizontal speed and vertical speed, other wise known as the glide slope. Each plane has a different glide slope; however, if you are not familiar with your planes preferred glide attitude here is an easy way to orientate your plane Pilot. You should angle your plane so that the speed of the plane is increasing as slowly as possible. As you loose altitude you will gain speed over time, but if you gain speed too fast you will be loosing altitude too fast as well. Use any control you have at your disposal to adjust your angle of attack to keep your fall and speed increase in check, using your speed to slow your decent when necessary by pitching up and pitching down to increase your decent and increase your speed, should you approach stall speed. When you are about to land, assuming you have reached the runway and are able to deploy your gears, you must set yourself into landing configuration, that is to say gears out and flaps down, at the latest possible time. Both the flaps and gears generate drag which will hamper your ability to control the planes speed and decent which will be catastrophic close to the ground.

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This is very nice work. Unfortunately, this event is about the vehicles themselves, not things you do with them.

We were tasked with creating a page about a vehicle and teaching new players how to use them.

 

This would be an excellent article in the Wiki itself though, and I would actually suggest creating a page concerning this topic and submit it for the Wiki Editors. As I said, this is excellent advice for new players, just not within the scope of the event.

 

Keep up the good work!

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Unfortunately this Contest is for vehicle pages not strategy pages, please see contest rules.

Your efforts are appreciated and if we ever run a contest for these type of articles i suggest to resubmit.

medal medal

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On 4/18/2015 at 0:42 AM, EternalAutotaku said:

Landing without the elevator is one of the most strenuous exercises that any pilot will have to accomplish. Everything that you do on approach can cause you to loose or gain speed; which in turn, without the intervention of the elevator, will cause your aircraft to pitch down or up respectively. Being close to the ground, this is a dangerous situation to be in. The only way to keep you aircraft in the air and relatively level is to use your engine power. The aircraft, under constant 100% power, will describe a oscillating vertical line. As the aircraft noses up it gains altitude, its speed decreases and it looses lift, eventually it will nose back over and begin loose altitude for increasing speed and increasing lift and the process will start all over again. To address this you should manage the throttle to control the speed, lift and altitude it will gain and loose. Decreasing the throttle will cause it nose over faster or loose more altitude if it is at a nose down attitude. Increasing or decreasing the throttle during the change from attitudes will level out its oscillation. Unfortunately, the final stages of your landing will affect that flight model that you have been used to on your approach. Deploying the landing gear will increase the drag, meaning that the throttle must be increased to accommodate this. Also of note, the deployment of the flaps will increase the lift the wings generate, no matter how level the flight path is this will cause a extreme nose up attitude under "normal" power in this situation. Therefore it would be best to deploy your aircraft into its final landing configuration early so that you can manage the flight model in this configuration and not cause any sudden disturbances in a critical situation, either too low or too slow.

 

I'd like to add something there: often I see people flying planes without elevator control, and often they somehow end up in a dive and panic, not knowing how to pull out. Well atleast at high(er) altitudes you can use your rudder as an elevator; turn your plane sideways and then apply rudder as you would normally use your elevator. There are a few downsides however; your rudder is usually less effective, you can not use this at low altitude because of your wing hitting something, and some planes with bad roll rates like bombers might be very hard to control, especially when trying to swith between vertical and horizontal corrections using only your rudder.

Hope this helps some unlucky pilots that find themselves in such a dilema.

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On 10/09/2016 at 0:19 PM, nuclearjasper said:

I'd like to add something there: often I see people flying planes without elevator control, and often they somehow end up in a dive and panic, not knowing how to pull out. Well atleast at high(er) altitudes you can use your rudder as an elevator; turn your plane sideways and then apply rudder as you would normally use your elevator. There are a few downsides however; your rudder is usually less effective, you can not use this at low altitude because of your wing hitting something, and some planes with bad roll rates like bombers might be very hard to control, especially when trying to swith between vertical and horizontal corrections using only your rudder.

Hope this helps some unlucky pilots that find themselves in such a dilema.

 

I made a video showing a landing on a He-111 withtou any elevator control, I used power variations with some give and take flap and made it home from really far away... Until I got the grip I almost stalled the thing... whatch it carefully (I didnt narrate it) and you´ll get.. The name is in portuguese but it says "Miracle with a HE-111 - without elevator control"...

 

 

This is another one that i losto both engines on a HE-111 and made a deadstick to the airport..

 

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This one I lost engine power in a Bf-109 really far from home and had to glide through a cloud layer... When glinding You have to maintain a best gliding speed, If you go too fast or too slow you are loosing range... You basically fly an airplane using its Atitude, when unde instrument conditions you maintain that using artificial horizon. Flaps and gear are to be used only when landing is assured... PS: Longest deadstick in history is a joke ok?... not a brag...

 

On 17/04/2015 at 7:42 PM, EternalAutotaku said:

Introduction

A aircraft is only as good as its pilot... but what happens when your aircraft is not responding at its maximum efficiency.Pilot, it is time that you learn how fly and land a plane that has taken critical damage. This article will cover everything from wing skin damage to stabilizer control failure in independent topics. Many of these damage models and their counter actions at the time of approach happen together, if this is the case you should be able to use these skills in co-operation with one another adjusting speed and approach angle respectively. We hope that you never need to use this training, Pilot, but it would be best if you knew should the situation present itself. While the sections including some kind of damage and control loss are hard to simulate it is advised that aircraft new to the pilot are taken out in a test flight to practise ditching, retracted gear landings and un-powered landings as each aircraft behaves differently from others.

 

  • Landing with wing skin damage
  • Landing with flap damage
  • Landing with aileron loss
  • Landing with rudder loss
  • Landing with elevator loss
  • Landing without landing gear/Ditching
  • Landing without engine power

Landing with Wing Skin Damage

Wing skin damage can be a silent killer in the world of War Thunder, causing you to loose turning ability during combat hampering your ability to engage enemies effectively. But it can spell disaster on the approach to an airfield or aircraft carrier as well. As the aircraft approaches the airfield you will be be loosing speed to avoid overloading your landing gear and deploying flaps to increase lift. At these low speeds however the damage to the wing will cause that wing to loose lift, effectively making that wing stall at low enough speeds. If this is not corrected the aircraft to roll over onto its side and crash, wing tip first.

The best way to combat this scenario is to keep your approach angle as shallow as possible and have your speed relatively high. Generally aircraft will land at speeds lower than 190km/h with flaps extended and engine running at 30%-40%; a aircraft with damaged wings should aim to have speeds no lower than 190km/h, this will keep the lift levels over the damaged wing acceptable and the plane will not roll much more than 10'.

 

Landing with Flap Damage

Flap damage will cause drag on the landing approach, the plane will rotate about its vertical axis. The rudder can be used to correct this in all but the worst of damage situations, in which case it is prudent to approach landing as if the plane was suffering wing skin damage (often the two go hand in hand which can increase the difficulty of the approach). Keeping a low, long, high speed approach to the airfield is the way to go about handling the aircraft as you may not be able to deploy flaps to increase your lift at lower speeds.

 

Landing with Aileron Loss

Aileron loss is often catastrophic during combat flight, the plane will lock its orientation at the moment of control loss often resulting in a irrecoverable dive. However there are certain situations where the plane may right itself after loosing control, often where the roll was not very pronounced at the time of control loss. The roll can be corrected slowly using the rudder, unchecked the rudders' movement will roll the plane without much effort. As you will not be able to correct a turn quickly you should ensure that you are lined up with the runway well ahead of schedule, using the rudder to make minor adjustments to your flight path once lined up. Aside from this extended approach, landing should not be much different than any other landing, speed is not a factor unless the aircraft is suffering either flap of wing skin damage, in which case, you should approach as if you were only suffering from that specific issue as the distance that you will be covering negates the issues of having no ailerons.
 

Landing with Rudder Loss

Rudder loss behaves and impacts your flight in the same way as aileron loss, but the problems will be less pronounced and easier to deal with as rolling the aircraft with the ailerons is easier than with the rudder. Hence you can afford to make the approach a shorter than that with damaged ailerons as course corrections will be easier to implement and over-corrections will be easier to address.

 

Landing with Elevator Loss

Landing without the elevator is one of the most strenuous exercises that any pilot will have to accomplish. Everything that you do on approach can cause you to loose or gain speed; which in turn, without the intervention of the elevator, will cause your aircraft to pitch down or up respectively. Being close to the ground, this is a dangerous situation to be in. The only way to keep you aircraft in the air and relatively level is to use your engine power. The aircraft, under constant 100% power, will describe a oscillating vertical line. As the aircraft noses up it gains altitude, its speed decreases and it looses lift, eventually it will nose back over and begin loose altitude for increasing speed and increasing lift and the process will start all over again. To address this you should manage the throttle to control the speed, lift and altitude it will gain and loose. Decreasing the throttle will cause it nose over faster or loose more altitude if it is at a nose down attitude. Increasing or decreasing the throttle during the change from attitudes will level out its oscillation. Unfortunately, the final stages of your landing will affect that flight model that you have been used to on your approach. Deploying the landing gear will increase the drag, meaning that the throttle must be increased to accommodate this. Also of note, the deployment of the flaps will increase the lift the wings generate, no matter how level the flight path is this will cause a extreme nose up attitude under "normal" power in this situation. Therefore it would be best to deploy your aircraft into its final landing configuration early so that you can manage the flight model in this configuration and not cause any sudden disturbances in a critical situation, either too low or too slow.

 

Landing without Landing Gear/Ditching

Landing without your under carriage extended is quite common after your aircraft has gone through a intense fire, which can physically burn your landing gear from the inside, or after taking critical cannon round damage. Either way landing a crippled aircraft in this state is a high difficulty skill, at least in such a way that the aircraft does not sustain more damage causing it to become unrepairable. The trick is to "bottom out" the aircraft on landing, approaching the ground as slowly as possible while keeping the under belly in as parallel a orientation as possible to the ground. Obviously the angle of attack of the wings will change from plane to plane but as long as the belly impacts on a flat the structural integrity of the fuselage should be preserved. Come in to the runway and level off your decent at about 20m off the runway surface and reduce power to your engines, slowly raising the planes nose until its belly is level with the ground, but keeping enough power that your aircraft does not stall or descend too fast. If you land properly without the gear you will only suffer propeller bending. If you over angle you risk loosing the tail section, which can be fatally critical to bombers with the impact to personnel, while under angling can result in a high speed lean on one of the wings or even engines in multi engined craft which will often lead to fire and irrecoverable loss of the aircraft. Ditching, while due to more recent up dates does not seem to save the aircraft as often, is still a effective test of skill and will allow you to save the crew. You must be going slower than on a usual gear less landing as impact with water is often very forceful and can tear a aircraft apart and it is often prudent to angle slightly more than usual, keeping the engine blocks out of the water until you have sufficiently slowed down.

 

Landing without Engine Power

None of the aircraft you will pilot were meant to fly without powered assistance. In the desperate situation where power is no longer available to the aircraft the pilot must engage in the most intense balancing act every to be forced upon a pilot. That is the balance of horizontal speed and vertical speed, other wise known as the glide slope. Each plane has a different glide slope; however, if you are not familiar with your planes preferred glide attitude here is an easy way to orientate your plane Pilot. You should angle your plane so that the speed of the plane is increasing as slowly as possible. As you loose altitude you will gain speed over time, but if you gain speed too fast you will be loosing altitude too fast as well. Use any control you have at your disposal to adjust your angle of attack to keep your fall and speed increase in check, using your speed to slow your decent when necessary by pitching up and pitching down to increase your decent and increase your speed, should you approach stall speed. When you are about to land, assuming you have reached the runway and are able to deploy your gears, you must set yourself into landing configuration, that is to say gears out and flaps down, at the latest possible time. Both the flaps and gears generate drag which will hamper your ability to control the planes speed and decent which will be catastrophic close to the ground.

 

Excellent material... you covered all the important points of precedures... hope I could add something with the videos I made on this topic. I did them a while ago, but thought they fitted perfectly with you explanation...

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24 minutes ago, *capFreddy said:

 

I made a video showing a landing on a He-111 withtou any elevator control, I used power variations with some give and take flap and made it home from really far away... Until I got the grip I almost stalled the thing... whatch it carefully (I didnt narrate it) and you´ll get.. The name is in portuguese but it says "Miracle with a HE-111 - without elevator control"...

 

 

This is another one that i losto both engines on a HE-111 and made a deadstick to the airport..

 

 

On multiengine, and even some single engine on war thunder, you can feather the props. If you guys pay atention to this video, when the engines were quiting the speed was droping, as soon as I feathered the props It even gained some speed and made glide possible...

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I found deadstick landing not as hard as landing without elevators, tbh. Yes, losing power is unpleasant, but most of these babies can glide at least a little. No rudder is not really a problem. Few of us use them to land anyway... ;)

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