_SKYWHALE_

My Manual Engine Controls Tutorial with Video - Updated 1.47

(old thread removed and links to here)

UPDATED INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEO ON MANUAL ENGINE CONTROLS WITH COMMENTARY

BOEING B-29 SUPERFORTRESS - Start-up Sequence, Takeoff, Bombing, Shutting down and feathering engines, landing on port engines only! Works for Realistic and Simulator battles!

*A LOT* of work went into this, but if there's anything I missed or anything additional you have to add, PLEASE LET ME KNOW :D

 

In the video I fly the B-29 out in a test flight, to explain separate engine controls and how this confusing system can work in this game. Before we start, I'd like to point out it's crazy that this game does not have multiple throttle axes yet, and it forces me to select which engine I want to manipulate before I do, because as you will see it can cause a bit of confusion when you are trying to link up engines again after turning off one or several.
 
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWHb53poZng
 
HERE ARE THE CONTROLS I USE WITH MY SAITEK YOKE. You can apply these to whichever controller type you have!
t0jajk.png
FORGOT TO ADD BUT I USE MOUSE FOR FREE LOOK so i can hold the yoke with left hand and look around with mouse. also with the hat switch i can shift head sideways+up and down to see around the headrest as good as anyone with trackIR 

 

If you see a * next to a word, there is more information about that term at the very end of this post. 
 
 
ENGINE START-UP:
(Start engines in order 3-2-4-1)

  • Select Engine 'X' ON
  • Toggle Engine
  • Turn off controls of that engine for now
  • Repeat for each other engine

TESTING ENGINE POWER:
(Any order I guess, I use 1-2-3-4)
I know testing engine power doesn't matter here because we don't have Manifold Pressure*, Torqueometer* or Tachometers* working and of course no bomber cockpits, but it adds just a bit more realism.

  • Engine 1 should already be selected from start-up sequence.
  • Hold brakes, slowly walk throttle up to 100%
  • Walk throttle back down to idle
  • De-select that engine
  • Repeat for each other engine

TAKE-OFF AND CLIMBOUT:

  • Toggle control of all 4 engines
  • Lower take-off flaps (flaps 10-15 degrees on most aircraft)
  • Slowly walk throttle up to WEP over 3-5 seconds
  • Release brake
  • Use rudder to correct for torque, but you already know that from other ships.
  • You will need to figure out V1* speed yourself for each plane
  • Upon reaching Vr* slowly rotate the aircraft 10-15o up until it lifts itself off at V2*. You also might consider just setting say 30% elevator trim and waiting for the plane to take off itself if you get really lazy, or are worried about knocking out a crew member (looking at you, B-24)
  • After clearing about 50 feet (15m or so) of runway, retract the landing gear and Immediately throttle down to METO* power.
  • After climbing about another 100-200 feet, retract the take-off flaps, level off and trim the ship for preferred climb.

CLIMBING TO ALTITUDE:

  • This is obviously different for every plane, but once you have found the correct climbing SPEED, consider trying (after resetting trim):
  • 94% Throttle
  • 20-40% Radiator* (to reduce drag)
  • 90-95% RPM (this is not fully modeled yet, but you /usually/ get slightly more power with an RPM setting slightly less than max.)
  • MIXTURE*: Set it as HIGH as you can before you start to lose power for climb and descent
  • Attitude is not as important as speed in climbing. Get to your most efficient climbing speed, and then continuously adjust pitch during climb to maintain that speed.

CRUISING:
Once at your desired altitude, you can trim for level flight again.
Again, this is different for every plane, but a good place to start would be:

  • 85-90% Throttle
  • 10-20% radiator
  • 80-90% RPM
  • Set mixture as LOW as you can without losing power for cruise.
  • Mess around with the plane you are flying though, as some planes fly slightly faster with less/more RPM

BOMBING YOUR TARGET:

  • In real life, your chances of hitting a bomb target with the aircraft wobbling around was almost nil, so your best effort must be put forth to keep the ship steady.
  • Trim for level flight.
  • You will notice in the video that at extreme altitudes the bomb sight loses a great deal of accuracy, such as in real life.
  • As you drop your payload, consider slowly lowering elevator trim at the same time, since the aircraft is becoming lighter.
  • Once all your bombs are dropped, THEN feel free to turn. Not only is this to give you more accurate bombs, but with bombs still attached, it is much easier to break your wings

ENGINE SHUTDOWN AND FEATHERING MID-FLIGHT:

  • Throttle up to 100% to keep your good engines running at full strength...you'll need it.
  • DE-SELECT THE GOOD ENGINE(s)
  • With only the engine you wish to shut down selected, lower throttle to 0%.
  • You will notice the aircraft start to roll, this is due to asymmetric thrust. Be ready for it, and trim for level flight.
  • Shut down the offending engine.
  • Close the radiator on the offending engine to reduce drag.
  • Toggle feathering to turn the prop blades into the wind, and allow them to rotate freely with the free air, reducing drag dramatically.
  • DESELECT THE OFFENDING ENGINE (you should now have no engines being controlled, but the good ones should still be running at 100% of their own accord.)
  • Put radiator back to 100% and bring the throttle back up in preparation for controlling the other engines again.
  • TOGGLE CONTROLS BACK ON OF THE GOOD ENGINES.
  • AS SOON AS THIS HAPPENS, THE GAME WILL THINK YOU STILL WANT THAT ENGINE FEATHERED TOO, SO PRESS THE FEATHER BUTTON AGAIN TO TURN IT OFF, and you should see the engine start moving fast again.
  • You have now shutdown and feathered the bad/overheating engine, and you should try to get back to the airfield as soon as you can.

LANDING WITH LESS THAN ALL OF YOUR ENGINES:

  • Landing procedure with less than all of your engines is pretty standard except that you might not have the chance to make a go-around if you miss the landing.
  • With that in mind, try to line-up for a landing the best you can, aiming at a point at the end of the runway. This is because you can (almost) always reduce speed further before landing if you overshoot, but it's much harder to gain speed back with only 1-2 engines running.

LANDING ON NO ENGINES:

  • ENSURE ALL NON-WORKING ENGINES ARE FEATHERED AND RADIATORS ARE CLOSED FOR MAXIMUM GLIDE
  • Try to create an approach to give yourself just one turn to line-up with the runway, and you can use that last turn to determine what speed you need to land at: sharper to bleed speed, gentle to conserve it.
  • Drop gear just before or during your turn onto final approach.
  • In my opinion, do not lower landing flaps until landing is assured, as there's usually a rather abrupt pitch-up. Use your rudder as an 'air-brake' and correct the roll with ailerons to stay level if you need to slow down while still descending.
  • About 50 feet off the runway, lower landing flaps.
  • Flair the aircraft once you are close to the ground and nearing Vat*, it should pull up slightly and softly touch down at Vs*

LANDING WITH NO GEAR?!?

  • Make a normal approach.
  • TRY TO LAND ON GRASS IT ACTUALLY HELPS
  • Upon landing, approach at a speed slightly above Vat so that you can land almost level (instead of a dramatic flair up)
  • Glide over the runway as much as you possibly can, and try to make the touch-down as soft as you possibly can.
  • Sometimes you break apart completely even if making a nice belly-landing that would probably be safe IRL. Blame gaijin.

____________________________________________________________________

 

HERE ARE SOME HELPFUL TERMS / ADDITIONAL THINGS I ADDED OVER TIME

_______________________________________________________

 

 

Radiator - The thing that helps keep your engine cool! The radiator is basically a series of snaking tubes that take the hot engine coolant, pass cold air over it to cool it down, and pass it back into the engine. The thing you actually have control over in the game - which the engine controls label 'radiator' is COWL FLAPS:
 
If the aircraft is equipped with adjustable Cowl Flaps:

  • Cowl Flap Position Control (RADIATOR IN THIS GAME) - Cowl Flaps are opened during high power/low airspeed operations like takeoff to maximize the volume of cooling airflow over the engine's cooling fins.
  • Cylinder Head Temperature Gauge - Indicates the temperature of all cylinder heads or on a single CHT system, the hottest head. A Cylinder Head Temperature Gauge has a much shorter response time than the oil temperature gauge, so it can alert the pilot to a developing cooling issue more quickly. 

Engine overheating may be caused by:

  • Running too long at a high power setting.
  • Poor leaning technique.
  • Restricting the volume of cooling airflow too much.
  • Insufficient delivery of lubricating oil to the engine's moving parts.

____________________________________________________________________________

 
PROP RPM CONTROLS - Most engines produce their maximum power in a narrow speed band, so in real life paying attention to prop RPM is......important, lol. Running too low RPM while on a high power setting is very very bad for the engine as it produces a LOT more torque, which is the final setting for power in piston engine aircraft (eg, setting cruise: set manifold pressure, THEN set required cruise RPM, then go back to MAP and fine-tune until proper TORQUE is achieved).
 
IN THIS GAME - 100% RPM seems to work the best on a lot of planes, but you should check this out in each one you fly. I have found in some aircraft cruising at 80-90% RPM gives me a boost of several knots since on certain power settings FULL RPM WILL NOT BE THE MOST EFFICIENT SPEED

____________________________________________________________________________

 
FUEL MIXTURE - Since this is barely modeled here I won't go over it much. Engines run on a fuel/air ration of less than 1% fuel which is sprayed into the engine through a misting injector. Engines run with slightly more power on lean mixes of around .06% (someone correct me if I am wrong), but this also means they run hotter, since fuel also acts a coolant. At high altitudes in cruise it is fine to use lean mix to conserve fuel, as the freezing cold air will cool the engine enough. IN GAME, I find it best to set mixture as high as I can without losing power.

___________________________________________________________________________

 

Turbochargers and Superchargers - The only difference is that a supercharger is connected to the engine's crankshaft, and a turbocharger is powered by the exhaust gas. Both of these systems work to compress air that is going into the intake chamber, that's all. This basically increases the output of the engine by making the air denser. It is used at altitude to give planes a higher service ceiling (eg, at 10,000 feet, turbo/supercharger (some planes have both) compresses the air to the density of sea level). They can also be used AT LOWER ALTITUDES IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS to boost engine power above what it could normally put out (and often above torque limits if applied too much, this should only be done for very very short take-off necessities or thinks of that nature I guess)

 

THEIR IN GAME USE:

Turbochargers: LEAVE IT ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL any time I try to manipulate the turbos it breaks the engine

SUPERCHARGERS how work like a charm if you have them. They work in gears, usually 2 (low blow, high blow). Generally, using gear 1 gives more power and should be used below 4-5000m. Gear 2 is high blow, compressing more air for your engine, so above 5000 meters or so it should be used. Trying with the Spitfire F (not LF) Mk IX, i was able to attain a height of over 12000 meters and at about 9000 meters I got back to normal cruise speed and was able to perform maneuvers with little difference to sea level.

 

__________________________________________________________________________

 

Trim - Totally necessary for successful flight. Trim controls adjust small tabs on the elevator/ailerons/rudder to correct unwanted roll/pitch/yaw in order to maintain level flight.
PRO TIP - Your plane doesn't have trim controls?? Oh well, you are condemned to wobble! Just kidding! Simply go into your controls, select full real if you somehow aren't already, and double click roll/pitch/yaw axis. Then simply add correction in whichever direction needs it. GG

 

______________________________________________

 

Feathering - On some variable-pitch propellers, the blades can be rotated parallel to the airflow to reduce drag in case of an engine failure. This uses the term feathering, borrowed from rowing. On single-engine aircraft, whether a powered glider or turbine-powered aircraft, the effect is to increase the gliding distance. On a multi-engine aircraft, feathering the propeller on a failed engine helps the aircraft to maintain altitude with the reduced power from the remaining engines.
Most feathering systems for reciprocating engines sense a drop in oil pressure and move the blades toward the feather position, and require the pilot to pull the propeller control back to disengage the high-pitch stop pins before the engine reaches idle RPM.
 
V Speeds!
V1 - Engine Failure Recognition speed. Basically if an engine fails under this speed you abort takeoff, if it fails over this speed, you continue with take-off procedure.
VRRotation speed. The speed at which you pull back slightly and the nose wheel leaves the ground
VTakeoff safety speed. The speed at which the aircraft could take off with one engine inoperative. You will use this most of the time as your regular take-off speed.
Vat Threshold speed. Basically minimum safe flying speed
Vs - Stall Speed.
Vne - Velocity to never exceed. Learn it. Live it. :D
 
Manifold PressureManifold vacuum, or engine vacuum in an internal combustion engine is the difference in air pressure between the engine's intake manifold and Earth's atmosphere. Measure in inches of mercury with 30 being pressure at sea level (metric uses atmospheres, 1 being pressure at sea level)
Tachometer - Shows engine/prop RPM
Torqueometer - measures engine torque in PSI (not sure what unit they use in metric


 

_______________________________________________________

 

 

 

Due to a (frankly) bug with auto propeller control, on fighters which have it, it should really be disengaged and RPM managed manually. The reason why it should not be automatically managed is that it's impossible to achieve proper cruise or maximum continuous settings using automatic engine control. Auto propeller management works generally fine only at 100% power and WEP, any setting below "military" (this is, in game, 100%) cannot be done using auto.

For instance for some of the fighters (Allison powered), maximum continuous (from manual) is achieved with around 85% rpm and 85% throttle ingame. When it is set like this there is not all that much power loss, the plane flies normally, but the cooling is much better, and fuel consumption is lower (granted, this is rarely a factor ingame).

So, if you have a throttle which has two controls next to each other in general you can operate them simultaneously (our propeller control seems to be "idealized" - meaning it responds instantly and precisely). Of course in theory you should not fly at full throttle with lower RPM, in game it doesn't really hurt the engine from what I can see. However I have the habit of managing the engine properly.

 

 

 

Hopefully this video and the checklists I have provided have helped some people start using manual control of their aircraft!
 
IF YOU HAVE ANY FURTHER QUESTIONS, DO NOT HESITATE TO ASK ME HERE OR IN GAME, I WOULD BE HAPPY TO TRY TO HELP!
 
HAPPY FLYING AND GOOD LUCK!
 
 
 
 
-Majestic Skywhale(links to YouTube)

 

 

Too long, didn't read??? - Although it looked superficially like a dinosaur, Dimetrodon was actually a type of prehistoric reptile known as a pelycosaur. The pelycosaurs were themselves more closely related to the therapsids, or "mammal-like reptiles," than to the archosaurs from which dinosaurs evolved--which means that, technically speaking, Dimetrodon was closer to being a mammal than it was to being a dinosaur! Even people who know that Dimetrodon wasn't technically a dinosaur mistakenly assume that it lived alongside its more famous cousins. In fact, Dimetrodon prospered during the middle Permian period, between 280 and 265 million years ago, while the first dinosaurs (according to our current state of knowledge) evolved in South America during the middle Triassic period, about 50 million years later.

Edited by _SKYWHALE_
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Whoop - nice.
Too bad you can't "thank" an OP officially.
I honestly hadn't thought that WT goes into those depths really, even though when bugged here and there.
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Whoop - nice.
Too bad you can't "thank" an OP officially.
I honestly hadn't thought that WT goes into those depths really, even though when bugged here and there.

 

yep a few things are definitely still bugged and like i mention up top there's only the one throttle axis so you have to pre-select which engine you want to manipulate if only turning one of or changing one :D but it's still doable and actually helps put out engine fires sometimes :D Also you can usually run at max power output (before wep) with like 90% throttle, 85-90% prop RPM. With lots of planes this gives you same power as auto engine control with 100% power, but keeps the engine cooler just a bit longer :DD

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Turbochargers and Superchargers - The only difference is that a supercharger is connected to the engine's crankshaft, and a turbocharger is powered by the exhaust gas. Both of these systems work to compress air that is going into the intake chamber, that's all. This basically increases the output of the engine by making the air denser. It is used at altitude to give planes a higher service ceiling (eg, at 10,000 feet, turbo/supercharger (some planes have both) compresses the air to the density of sea level). They can also be used AT LOWER ALTITUDES IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS to boost engine power above what it could normally put out (and often above torque limits if applied too much, this should only be done for very very short take-off necessities or thinks of that nature I guess)

 

How do I know how far I can push my Turbocharger?

 

 

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Is there a gage in the cockpit for this? (Superchargers have manifold pressure or Boost).

 

depends on the engine or plane. if the plane you are in doesn't have a gauge though I'm pretty sure that manifold pressures above 40in hg are boosted so you could always estimate the usage of it by comparing your current power setting to that I think. There is probably a better way but I do not know the answer to that :D

Also all the superchargers in the game just have a low-blow and high-blow setting I think since i can only ever toggle between '1' and '2' whatever the hell that means.

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Awesome work, thanks alot!!!

 

but my joystick is rather old, all that works is the three axis, the throttle, and two buttons that I use for cannons/other guns and machine guns.  I normally use the number pad to look around, but I can get used to the freelook with the C key.  I'm going to try to get it to work with mostly keyboard controls, but I'm probably going to come back soon with questions.  Thank you though, awesome stuff, just what I was looking for!!!!!!!!

 

Edit: in the game when you change supercharger, it just alternates between gears 1 and 2.  Which one is on/off or better for high alt/low alt?

Edited by Bronto70937
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Edit: in the game when you change supercharger, it just alternates between gears 1 and 2.  Which one is on/off or better for high alt/low alt?

 

i think gear 2 is higher power but it might be backwards because gaijin. honestly there's no real modelling of it in the game so just keep it on whichever one is highest always tbh. the only time i sometimes use low blow is after emergency go around on carrier if i wanna fly around still with gear and flaps down after full takeoff power, sometimes i switch to low blower so i can keep like 90% power and not gain too much speed. other than that i would just always use high power.

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Have you found any planes that are good for testing how your controls are: EX: has all trim tabs, radiator, fuel mixture controls, turbocharger, etc.?

Edited by Bronto70937
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Have you found any planes that are good for testing how your controls are: EX: has all trim tabs, radiator, fuel mixture controls, turbocharger, etc.?

 

yeah p-47 :D

 

edit: also make sure to set the "toggle automatic control of X" functions because the planes that seem to not have radiator/pitch control often just have an automatic one which you need to disable in order to use it.

Edited by _SKYWHALE_
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Good job, I see a lot of hard work went into this! Hope to squad up with you again soon in game :)

 

thanks a lot and we will definitely play soon :D

 

 

How high can you run the turbocharger without damaging it?

 

that's temperature based i think and/or it has an RPM limit for X amount of minutes. But in the game i don't think there's any modelling at all of that. And anyway I haven't found a plane yet with working turbocharger :D (different than supercharger!)

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that's temperature based i think and/or it has an RPM limit for X amount of minutes. But in the game i don't think there's any modelling at all of that. And anyway I haven't found a plane yet with working turbocharger :D (different than supercharger!)

well, I just was messing with it on the P-47 and whenever I put the turbocharger at a certain percent (couldn't figure out what) I'd get a message saying something like, 'warning: Turbocharger damaged'  I thought it might be the low alt so I restarted with an undamaged one, flew it up to 30,000ft, and turned the turbocharger on to 90% and I got the same warning nearly instantly.  and there is most definitely a modelling of it in game, because I could instantly feel a speed and performance drop at that altitude that wasn't there before. 

Edited by Bronto70937
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Edit: in the game when you change supercharger, it just alternates between gears 1 and 2. Which one is on/off or better for high alt/low alt?

Depends on your plane. The various gears kick in at a certain altitude. Figure it out in test flights. Generally, higher gears are meant for higher altitudes. The F4U for example has 3 supercharger gears, the first one for altitudes below ~800 meters, the second one for altitudes between ~800 and ~5000 meters and the last one for ~5000+ meters. Having the supercharger running in the wrong gear severely hampers your plane's performance.

Already figured out how MEC works before I saw this, but this is great. I really appreciate it. It even works in RB with mouse aim. :) Really awesome stuff. Edited by Arawan
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