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Testing the Fw 190


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Testing the Fw 190

 

On 23 June 1942 Leutnant Arnim Faber of III./JG 2 became disorientated during a dogfight with Spitfires over southwest England, and landed in error at the RAF airfield at Pembrey, south Wales. After undergoing trials at the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough, the captured fighter went to the Air Fighting Development Unit (AFDU) at Duxford for tactical trials against each of the British and US fighter types that was likely to meet the German aircraft in combat. An abridged version of the resultant report, issued in August 1942 and reproduced below, shows how the German fighter compared with its contemporaries. It should be remembered that the words were not those of Focke-Wulf salesmen trying to boost their company's product, but came from those forced to give grudging admiration to a product of their foe.

 

Fw 190 vs Spitfire Mk VB

The Fw 190 was compared with an operational Spitfire Mk VB for speed and allround anoeuvrability at heights up to 25,000 ft. The Fw 190 is superior in speed at all heights, and the approximate ifferences are as follows:-

At 2,000 ft (610 m) the Fw 190 is 25-30 mph

(40-48 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk VB

At 3,000 ft (915 m) the Fw 190 is 30-35 mph

(48-56 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk VB

At 5,000 ft (1525 m) the Fw 190 is 25 mph

(40 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk VB

At 9,000 ft (2744 m) the Fw 190 is 25-30 mph

(40-48 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk VB

At 15,000 ft (4573 m) the Fw 190 is 20 mph

(32 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk VB

At 18,000 ft (5488 m) the Fw 190 is 20 mph

(32 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk VB

At 21,000 ft (6400 m) the Fw 190 is 20-25 mph

(32-40 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk VB

 

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After some nine hours of
test flying at RAE
Farnborough as MP499, the
Fw 190 was transferred to
the AFDU at Duxford on
13 July 1942. After six
months of evaluation flying
the aircraft was grounded
and later relegated to
engine bench tests.

 

Climb: The climb of the Fw 190 is superior to that of the Spitfire Mk VB at all heights. The best speeds for climbing are approximately the same, but the angle of the Fw 190 is considerably steeper. Under maximum continuous climbing conditions the climb of the Fw 190 is about 450 ft/min better up to 25,000 feet (7620 m). With both aircraft flying at high cruising speed and then pulling up into a climb, the superior climb of the Fw 190 is even more marked.

Dive: Comparative dives have shown that the Fw 190 can leave the Spitfire with ease, particularly during the initial stages.

 Manoeuvrability: The manoeuvrability of the Fw 190 is better than that of the Spitfire VB except in turning circles, when the Spitfire can guite easily out-turn it. The Fw 190 has better acceleration under all conditions of flight and this must obviously be useful during combat. When the Fw 190 was in a turn and was attacked by the Spitfire, the superior rate of roll enabled it to flick into a diving turn in the opposite direction. The pilot of the Spitfire found great difficulty in following this manoeuvre and even when prepared for it was seldom able to allow the correct deflection. It was found that if the Spitfire was cruising at low speed and was 'bounced' by the Fw 190, it was easily caught even if the Fw 190 was sighted when well out of range.

 

Fw 190 vs Spitfire Mk IX

The Focke Wulf 190 was compared with a fully operational Spitfire Mk IX for speed and   anoeuvrability at heights up to 25,000 ft. The Mk IX, at most heights, is slightly superior in speed, and the approximate differences in speeds at various heights are as follows:- At 2,000 ft (610 m) the Fw 190 is 7-8 mph (11-13 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk IX At 5,000 ft (1524 m) the Fw 190 and the Spitfire Mk IX are approximately the same

At 8,000 ft (2440 m) the Spitfire Mk IX is

8 mph (13 km/h) faster than the Fw 190

At 15,000 ft (4573 m) the Spitfire Mk IX is

5 mph (8 km/h) faster than the Fw 190

At 18,000 ft (5488 m) the Fw 190 is 3 mph

(5 km/h) faster than the Spitfire Mk IX

At 21,000 ft (6400 m) the Fw 190 and the

Spitfire Mk IX are approximately the same

At 25,000 ft (7620 m) the Spitfire Mk IX is

5-7 mph (8-11 km/h) faster than the Fw 190

 

Climb: During comparative climbs at various heights up to 23,000 ft, with both aircraft flying  under maximum continuous climbing conditions, little difference was found between the two aircraft although on the whole the Spitfire Mk IX was slightly better. Above 22,000 ft the climb of the Fw 190 falls off rapidly, whereas the climb of the Spitfire Mk IX is increasing. When both aircraft were flying a high cruising speed and were pulled up into a climb from level flight, the Fw 190 had a slight advantage in the initial stages of the climb due to its better acceleration. This superiority was slightly increased when both aircraft were pulled up into the climb from the dive.

Dive: The Fw 190 is faster in a dive than the Mk IX, particularly during the initial stage. The superiority is not so marked as with the Mk VB.

Manoeuvrability: The Fw 190 is more manoeuvrable than the Mk IX except in turning circle, when it is out-turned without difficulty.The superior rate of roll of the Fw 190 enabled it to avoid the Spitfire Mk IX if attacked when in a turn by flicking over into a diving turn in the opposite direction and, as with the Spitfire Mk VB, the Mk IX had great difficulty in following this manoeuvre. The initial acceleration of the Fw 190 is better than the Spitfire Mk IX under all conditions of flight, except in level flight at such altitudes where the Spitfire has a speed advantage and then, providing the Spitfire is cruising at high speed, there is little to choose between the two aircraft.

 

Fw 19O vs Mustang Mk 1A

The Fw 190 was compared with a fully operational Mustang Mk 1A for speed and allround performance up to 23,000 ft. There was little to choose between the aircraft in speed at all heights except between 10,000 and 15,000 ft, where the Mustang was appreciably faster. Approximate differences were as follows:

At 2,000 ft [610 m] the Fw 190 is 2 mph

(3 km/h) faster than the Mustang

At 5,000 ft (1525 m) the Mustang is 5 mph

(8 km/h) faster than the Fw 190

At 10,000 ft (3050 m) the Mustang is 15 mph

(24 km/h) faster than the Fw 190

At 20,000 ft (6100 m) the Fw 190 is 5 mph

(8 km/h) faster than the Mustang

At 23,000 ft (7010 m) the Fw 190 is 5 mph

(8 km/h) faster than the Mustang

Climb: The climb of the Fw 190 is superior to that of the Mustang Mk 1A at all heights. The best climbing speed for the Mustang is approximately 10 mph (16 km/h) slower than that for the Fw 190; the angle is not nearly so steep and the rate of climb is considerably inferior. When both aircraft are pulled up into a climb after a fast dive, the inferiority in the initial stage of the climb is not so marked, but if the climb is continued the Fw 190 draws away rapidly.

 Dive: Comparative dives have shown that there is little to choose between the two aircraft and, if anything, the Mustang is slightly faster in a prolonged dive.

Manoeuvrability: The manoeuvrability of the Fw 190 is better than of the Mustang except in turning circles where the Mustang is superior. In the rolling plane at high speed the Mustang compares more favourably with the Fw 190 than does the Spitfire. The acceleration of the Fw 190 under all conditions of flight is slightly better than that of the Mustang and this becomes more marked when both aircraft are cruising at low speed. When the Fw 190 was attacked by the Mustang in a turn, the usual manoeuvre of flicking into a diving turn in the opposite direction was not so effective against the Mustang as against the Spitfire, particularly if the aircraft were flying at high speed. The fact that the engine of the Mustang does not cut during the application of negative 'g proved a great asset, and gave the Mustang a reasonable chance of following the Fw 190 and shooting it down.

 

Fw 190 vs P-38F Lightning

The Fw 190 was compared with an operational P-38F flown by an experienced US Army Air Force pilot. The two aircraft were compared for speed and all-round manoeuvrability at heights up to 23,000 ft. The Fw 190 was superior in speed at all heights up to 22,000 ft, where the two aircraft were approximately the same. The approximate differences in speeds are as follows:

At 2,000 ft [610 m] the Fw 190 is 15 mph

(24 km/h) faster than the P-38F

At 8,000 ft (2440 m) the Fw 190 is 15 mph

(24 km/h) faster than the P-38F

At 15,000 ft (4573 m) the Fw 190 is 5-8 mph

(8-13 km/h) faster than the P-38F

At 23,000 ft (7010 m) the P-38F is 6-8 mph

(9-13 km/h) faster than the Fw 190

Climb: The climb of the P-38F is not as good as that of the Fw 190 up to 15,000 ft. Above this height the climb of the P-38F improves rapidly until at 20,000 ft [6010 m] it becomes superior. The best climbing speed for the P-38F is about 20 mph (32 km/h) less than that of the Fw 190 and the angle approximately the same. The initial rate of climb of the Fw 190, either from level flight or a dive, is superior to that of the P-38F at all heights below 20,000 ft and above After some nine hours of test flying at RAE Farnborough as MP499, the Fw 190 was transferred to the AFDU at Duxford on 13 July 1942. After six months of evaluation flying the aircraft was grounded and later relegated to engine bench tests. this height the climb of the P-38F becomes increasingly better.

Dive: Comparative dives proved the Fw 190 to be better, particularly in the initial stage. During prolonged dives the P-38F, on occasion, was slowly gaining on the Fw 190, but in combat it is unlikely that the P-38F would have time to catch up, before having to break off the attack. Manoeuvrability: The Fw 190 is superior to that of the P-38F, particularly in the rolling plane. Although at high speed the Fw 190 is superior in turning circles, it can be out-turned if the P-38F reduces its speed to about 140 mph (225 km/h), at which speed it can carry out a very tight turn, which the Fw 190 cannot follow. The acceleration of the two aircraft was compared and the Fw 190 was found to be better in all respects. When the Fw 190 'bounced' the P-38F and was seen when over 1,000 yards away, the pilot's best manoeuvre was to go into a diving turn and, if it found the Fw 190 was catching it up, to pull up into a spiral climb, flying at its lowest possible speed.

 

Conclusions

The Fw 190 is undoubtedly a formidable low- and medium-altitude fighter. Its designer has obviously given much thought to the pilot. The cockpit is well laid out and the absence of large levers and unnecessary gadgets most noticeable. The pilot is given a comfortable seating position, and is well protected by armour. The simplicity of the aircraft as a whole is an excellent feature, and enables new pilots to be thoroughly conversant with all controls in a very brief period. The all-round search view is the best that has yet been seen from any aircraft flown by this unit.The rough running of the engine is much disliked and must be a great disadvantage, as lack of confidence in an engine makes flying over bad country or water most unpleasant. The armament is good and well positioned, and the ammunition capacity should be sufficient for any normal fighter operation. The sighting view is approximately half a ring (of deflection) better than that from the Spitfire. The flying characteristics are exceptional, and a pilot new to the type feels at home immediately. The controls are light and well harmonised and all  anoeuvres can be carried out without difficulty at all speeds. The fact that the Fw 190 does not require re-trimming under all conditions of flight is a particularly good point. The initial acceleration is very good and is particularly noticeable in the initial stages of a climb or dive. Perhaps one of the most outstanding gualities of this aircraft is the remarkable aileron control. It is possible to change from a turn in one direction to a turn in the opposite direction with incredible speed. The main conclusion gained from the tactical trials of the Fw 190 is that our fighter aircraft must fly at high speed when in an area where the Fw 190 is likely to be met. This will give our pilots the chance of 'bouncing' and catching the Fw 190 and, if 'bounced' themselves, the best chance of avoiding being shot down.

 

Source : [aviation] Fw-190 Tank's 'Cavalry Horse' (Warplane Classic)

 

 

 

Josef "Pips" Priller
Oberst

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    Josef “Pips” Priller was born on 27 July 1915 at Ingolstadt in Bayern. In 1935, Fahnenjunker Priller was serving in Infanterieregiment 19. Oberfähnrich Priller transferred to the Luftwaffe and began his flying training at Salzwedel in October 1936.  On 1 April 1937, Leutnant Priller was posted to I./JG 135. In November 1938 the unit was redesignated I./JG 233 and again on 1 May 1939 to I./JG 51. In July 1939, he was serving with I./JG 71 which was to be redesignated II./JG 51 in October 1939. On 1 October 1939, Priller was appointed Staffelkapitän of 6./JG 51. He gained his first victories on 28 May 1940 over Dunkirk in aerial combat with RAF fighters. He claimed six victories during the French campaign, including his 6th on 25 June, when he shot down a RAF Spitfire fighter near Desvres. By the end of August his victory total stood at 15. On 17 October, Oberleutnant Priller claimed his 20th victory resulting in the award of the Ritterkreuz on 19 October. He claimed at least fourteen victories in the Battle of Britain. On 20 November 1940, Priller was transferred as Staffelkapitän to 1./JG 26, succeeding Oberleutnant Eberhard Henrici (7 victories) who had been lost in aerial combat over the Channel three days previously. Despite much combat with the British, Priller was unable to add to his score before the end of the year. That winter, JG 26 was withdrawn from the Channel front back to Germany for a rest. On his return to the Channel Priller enjoyed a remarkable run of victories between 16 June and 11 July 1941 shooting down 19 RAF aircraft, including 17 Spitfire fighters, to bring his victory total to 39. On 14 July, Priller shot down his 40th victim. He was awarded the Eichenlaub (Nr 28) on 19 October for 41 victories. Hauptmann Priller became Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG 26 on 6 December 1941. By the end of 1941 Priller’s score stood at 58. He recorded his 60th victory on 27 March 1942 and his 70th victory on 5 May.
 

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Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG 26 Hptm. Josef Priller (right) explaining a dogfight to his wingmann Lt. Johann Aistleitner. On the rudder of Priller`s Fw 190 A-2 (W.Nr. 5310) "<< + I" are seventy-three victory bars. June, 1942.
 
    By the end of 1942 Priller had 81 confirmed victories to his tally. On 11 January 1943, Priller became Kommodore of JG 26, replacing Major Gerhard Schöpfel (45 victories, RK) who was taking up a staff role. He was awarded the Schwertern (Nr 73) on 2 July 1944. Oberstleutnant Priller brought up his 100th victory on 18 July 1944 when he brought down a USAAF B-24 four-engine bomber. On 1 January 1945, Priller led JG 26 and III./JG 54 in the attack on the Allied airfields, codenamed Operation Bodenplatte, at Brussels-Evére and Brussels-Grimbergen. On 28 January, Priller was appointed Inspekteur der Jagdflieger Ost, a position that required he cease operational flying and which he held until the end of the war. Post-war “Pips” Priller managed the family brewery business. He died on 20 May 1961 at Böbing in Oberbayern following a heart attack.
    Josef “Pips” Priller flew 1,307 combat missions to achieve 101 victories. All his victories were recorded over the Western Front and include 11 four-engine bombers. He was the most succesful pilot in battles with Spitfires claiming at least  68 of them.

 

Josef "Sepp" Wurmheller
Major

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    Josef “Sepp” Wurmheller was born on 4 May 1917 at Hausham in Oberbayern. He was an accomplished glider and powered aircraft pilot pre-war. He began his training as a fighter pilot in the Luftwaffe in 1937. By summer of 1938, Gefreiter Wurmheller was serving with 2./JG 334. At the outbreak of World War 2, Unteroffizier Wurmheller was serving with 2./JG 53. He recorded his first victory, a RAF Fairey Battle single-engined bomber near Saarbrücken, on 30 September 1939. From November 1939 to June 1940, Wurmheller undertook instructing duties. In June 1940, Wurmheller returned to JG 53 and combat duty. Feldwebel Wurmheller was assigned to 5./JG 53. He participated in the Battle of Britain surviving two ditchings in the English Channel. His dousing in the Channel of 23 November in Bf 109 E-4 (W.Nr. 5212) following aerial combat over England resulted in hospitalisation until March 1941. On 7 May 1941, he gained his 9th and 10th victories when he downed two RAF Spitfire fighters. He spent a short period on the Eastern Front where he added nine victories to his tally. Oberfeldwebel Wurmheller was transferred back to the Channel front to serve with the Stabsstaffel of II./JG 2 in July 1941. In less than four weeks, Wurmheller claimed 13 Spitfires. On 4 September, Oberfeldwebel Wurmheller was awarded the Ritterkreuz for 31 victories. A further spell of instructing followed before a return to combat duty in May 1942. Assigned to 1./JG 2, Wurmheller gained 10 victories during May 1942. In June he claimed another 11 victories. His most successful day came during the Allied landings at Dieppe on 19 August 1942. Despite a crash-landing, during which he broke a leg and suffered concussion, Wurmheller claimed seven victories during the day. The feat earned Wurmheller a promotion to the rank of Leutnant and the award of the Eichenlaub (Nr 146), presented on 20 August 1942. His score stood at 60 victories.

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Oberleutnant Josef Wurmheller, Staffelkapitän 9./JG 2, was photographed, beside his Fw 190 A-6 (W.Nr. 530314) “Yellow 2”, in August/September 1943.     On 1 April 1943, Wurmheller was appointed Staffelkapitän of 9./JG 2. He recorded his 70th victory on 17 May, when he shot down a USAAF B-17 four-engine bomber. On 23 September, he was wounded by bomb splinters while making an emergency landing in Fw 190 A-6 (W.Nr. 530 314) “Yellow 2” during a bombing raid at Vannes-Meuçon. On 8 March 1944, he claimed his 90th victory. Hauptmann Wurmheller was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG 2 on 8 June 1944. He replaced Hauptmann Herbert Huppertz (78 victories, RK-EL) who had been shot down and killed in aerial combat. He downed two USAAF P-47 fighters near Caen on 12 June (100-101). Wurmheller killed in Fw 190 A-8 (W.Nr. 171 053) on 22 June 1944 during aerial combat with  Allied fighters near Alençon when he collided with his wingman. He was posthumously awarded the Schwerten (Nr 108) and promoted to the rank of Major on 24 October.
    Josef “Sepp” Wurmheller achieved 102 victories. He recorded nine victories over the Eastern Front. Of the 93 victories recorded over the Western Front, at least 20 were four-engine bombers and at least 56 RAF Spitfire fighters.

 

Hans "Assi" Hahn
Major
 
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    Hans “Assi” Hahn was born on 14 April 1914 at Gotha in Thüringen. A gifted athlete, Hahn was selected to participate in the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin to compete in the Pentathlon. Unfortunately, he had to withdraw due to illness. Hahn enlisted in the army on 1 April 1934 as an officer candidate in the Infanterie-Regiment 14. He received promotion to the rank of Unteroffizier on 1 December. He attended the Kriegsschule at München from January to October 1935. On 1 October, Hahn was promoted to the rank of Oberfähnrich. In November, Hahn transferred from the infantry to the Luftwaffe. He underwent pilot training at Celle. On 1 April 1936, Hahn was promoted to the rank of Leutnant. Following pilot training, he was posted to 4./JG 134, based at Werl near Dortmund, on 15 April. On 1 November 1937, Hahn was transferred to a new Jagdfliegerschule at Werneuchen as a flight instructor and Staffelführer of 1. Staffel. He received promotion to the rank of Oberleutnant on 1 February 1939 and was transferred to the Stabstaffel of I./JG 3, based at Meseburg. Oberleutnant Hahn transferred to JG 2 on 11 October 1939. He was assigned to newly formed II./JG 2, based at Zerbst, which was formed using the nucleus of personnel from I./JG 3 and I./JG 2. On 15 December, he was appointed Staffelkapitän of 4./JG 2. Moving West, Hahn claimed his first two victories on 14 May 1940, during the Battle of France, over RAF Hurricane fighters in his first engagement with enemy aircraft. However, only one of his claims was confirmed. Hahn would claim a total of five confirmed victories during the Battle of France. Hahn was particularly successful during the Battle of Britain. He claimed three RAF Spitfire fighters shot down on 31 August 1940, to record his eighth through 10th victories. After claiming his 20th victory on 20 September 1940, Hahn was awarded the Ritterkreuz. On 29 October 1940, Hahn was promoted to the rank of Hauptmann and appointed Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG 2. By the end of 1940, his victory total had reached 22. Hauptmann Hahn was awarded the Eichenlaub (Nr 32) on 14 August 1941 for 41 victories. He recorded his 50th victory on 13 October 1941 and his 60th on 4 May 1942. Hahn shot down a RAF Spitfire fighter on 16 September 1942 to record his 66th, and last, victory over the Western front. Hahn was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 54 “Grünherz”, based on the Eastern front, on 1 November 1942. In the space of three months, he claimed a further 42 victories. He shot down five Russian aircraft on 30 December (75-79). On 1 January, Hahn was promoted to the rank of Major. His best day occurred on 14 January 1943, when he downed seven Russian La-5 fighters (80-86). He recorded his 100th victory on 27 January 1943.

 
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 Hauptmann Hans "Assi" Hahn, Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG 2 in his Fw 109A-3 W.Nr. 223  "<<". May 1942, Beaumont le Roger, France.

 
    Leading III./JG54 on 21 February 1943, Hahn encountered Russian fighters near Staraya Russa. In the ensuing combat, he shot down a Russian La-5 fighter for his 108th, and last, victory. In the course of the combat, his aircraft received hits in the left wing. Disengaging from further combat, Hahn headed west but his engine soon began overheating and he had to land his Bf 109 G-2/R6 (W.Nr. 13 949) “Black <<” in enemy-held territory. Soviet sources claim Hahn was shot down by Russian ace Starshiiy Leytenant Pavel Grazhdanikov (13 victories, killed in action 5 April 1943) of 169 IAP, VVS. Hahn was captured and subsequently made a prisoner of war. Hahn was held captive and was not released by the Soviet Union until 1950. Hahn gained employment at the International Corporation of Bayer Leverkeusen, fulfilling a position dealing in trade with France and England. He later became a director of the Wano Schwarzpulver Company, which manufactured gunpowder, at Kunigunde near Goslar. He retired from this company in 1977 and lived in southern France with his family. Hahn died on 18 December 1982 at München from cancer.
    “Assi” Hahn was credited with 108 victories in 560 missions. He recorded 66 victories over the Western Front, of them 53  were Spitfires. Of the 42 victories he recorded over the Eastern front at least seven were Il-2 Sturmovik ground-attack aircraft.

 

Egon Mayer
Oberstleutnant

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    Egon Mayer was born on 19 August 1917 at Konstanz in Bodensee. He joined the Luftwaffe in 1937. After a regular peacetime training, Fahnenjunker Mayer was posted to I./JG 2 on 6 December 1939. By the time Mayer participated in the French campaign, he was serving with 6./JG 2. Mayer recorded his first victory on 13 June 1940, when he shot down a French Morane fighter. From 1 August 1940, he served at the Jagdfliegerschule Werneuchen. Mayer had returned to JG 2 by September 1940. Mayer was assigned to 3./JG 2, based at Beaumont-le-Roger in France. He claimed a RAF Hurricane fighter shot down near Portland on 7 October to record his second victory. Leutnant Mayer was transferred to 8./JG 2, where he recorded one victory, a Hurricane shot down near Chichester on 15 November 1940 for his third victory. On 10 June 1941, Oberleutnant Mayer was appointed Staffelkapitän of 7./JG 2, based at St Pol-Brias. He was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 1 August 1941 for 20 victories. Mayer recorded his 30th victory, yet another Spitfire, shot down on 15 April 1942. On 19 August, his 25th birthday, Mayer shot down two RAF Spitfire fighters over Dieppe (51-52). In November 1942, Hauptmann Mayer was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of III./JG 2.

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Staffelkapitän of 7./JG 2 Oblt. Egon Mayer beside the tail of his Fw 190A-3 (probably W.Nr. 435) "White 7". June/July 1942.

    On 23 November, Mayer recorded his first victories over USAAF four-engine bombers, when he shot down two B-17s and a B-24 (53-55). With Georg-Peter Eder (78 victories, RK-EL), Mayer is credited with developing the head-on attack technique against the Allied daylight bomber raids. The technique brought both considerable success against the four-engine bombers. He was awarded the Eichenlaub (Nr 232) on 16 April 1943 after 63 victories. Oberstleutnant Mayer was appointed Kommodore of JG 2 on 1 July 1943, following the departure of Oberst Walter Oesau (127 victories, RK-S, killed in action 11 May 1944) to become Jafü Bretagne. He shot down three USAAF B-17 four-engine bombers in 19 minutes on 6 September 1943 (78-80). On 1 December, Mayer claimed four USAAF P-47 fighters and a B-17 bomber shot down (85-89). He achieved his 90th victory on 31 December and was the first to reach 100 victories on the Channel Front on 5 February 1944, when he shot down a P-47 fighter near Arguen. He claimed his 101st and 102nd, and last, victories on 6 February, when he shot down two P-47 fighters in the Sens area. On 2 March 1944, Mayer led a formation from JG 2 against an USAAF daylight raid. USAAF P-47 fighters escorted the bombers. The fighter escort overpowered Mayer’s attacking group and he was shot down and killed near Montmédy in Fw 190 A-6 (W.Nr. 470 468). He was posthumously awarded the Schwertern (Nr 51).
    Egon Mayer shot down 102 enemy aircraft. All his victories were recorded over the Western Front and included 26 four-engine bombers, 51 Spitfire and 12 P-47 fighters.
 


 

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Armin Faber
 

Oberleutnant Armin Faber was a Luftwaffe pilot in World War II who mistook the Bristol Channel for the English Channel and landed his Focke-Wulf 190 (Fw-190) intact at RAF Pembrey in south Wales. His plane was the first Fw-190 to be captured by the Allies and was tested to reveal any weaknesses that could be exploited.[1]

 

23 June 1942

In June 1942, Oberleutnant Armin Faber was Gruppen-Adjutant to the commander of the III fighter Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 2 (JG 2) based in Morlaix in Brittany. On 23 June, he was given special permission to fly a combat mission with 7th Staffel. The unit operated Focke-Wulf 190 fighters.

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Faber's Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-3 of III/JG 2 at RAF Pembrey, June 1942.

The FW-190 had only recently arrived with front line units at this time and its superior performance had caused the Allies so many problems that they were considering mounting a commando raid on a French airfield to capture one for evaluation.

7th Staffel was scrambled to intercept a force of twelve Bostons on their way back from a bombing mission. A fight developed over the English Channel with the escorting Spitfires, during which Faber was attacked by Sergeant František Trejtnar of No. 310 Squadron. In his efforts to shake off the Spitfire, Faber flew north over Exeter in Devon. After much high-speed manoeuvring, Faber, with only one cannon working, pulled an Immelmann turn into the sun and shot down his pursuer in a head-on attack.

Trejnar baled out safely, but the disorientated Faber now mistook the Bristol Channel for the English Channel and flew north instead of south. Thinking South Wales was France, he turned towards the nearest airfield - RAF Pembrey. Observers on the ground could not believe their eyes as Faber waggled his wings in a victory celebration, lowered the Focke-Wulf's undercarriage and landed.[2]

The Pembrey Duty Pilot, one Sargeant Jeffreys, grabbed a Very pistol and ran from the control tower and jumped onto the wing of Faber's aircraft as it taxied in.[3]

Faber was arrested and later taken to RAF Fairwood Common by Group Captain David Atcherley (twin brother of Richard Atcherley) for interrogation.

Focke-Wulf 190A-3
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Faber's captured Focke Wulf Fw 190A-3 at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, with the RAE's chief test pilot, Wing Commander H J "Willie" Wilson at the controls, August 1942.

Faber's plane was a Fw 190A-3 with the Werknummer 313. It was the only fighter configuration to be captured intact by the Allies during the war. All other captured aircraft were either of the long range bomber or fighter bomber configuration.

Group Captain Hugh Wilson was asked to fly it from RAF Pembrey to RAF Farnborough under the guarantee not to crash. This was an impossible guarantee to give, so the plane was dismantled and transported via lorry instead.

At Farnborough, the Fw-190 was repainted in RAF colours and given the serial MP499 and a 'P' for prototype. Testing and evaluation commenced on 3 July 1942 at the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) at RAF Farnborough. Roughly nine flying hours were recorded, providing the Allies with extremely valuable intelligence.

After 10 days it was transferred to the Air Fighting Development Unit at RAF Duxford for tactical assessment, where it was flown in mock combat trials against the new Spitfire Mk.IX, providing the RAF with methods to best fight the Fw 190A with their new fighter.[4]

The Fw-190 was flown 29 times between 3 July 1942 and 29 January 1943. It was then partially dismantled and tests done on engine performance at Farnborough. It was struck off charge and scrapped in September 1943.

Repatriation

Whilst a prisoner of war in Canada, Faber managed to successfully convince British authorities that he suffered from epilepsy. Remarkably, it appears the authorities were taken in by his ruse and in 1944 they allowed his repatriation. Shortly after his return, he was again flying in front-line fighter operations.

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I saw your archive somewhere in forums, just brilliant also can you add the source at the end of this article for it's reliability please?

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Fw190 A5

 

 I have to make a small correction, it was A-3 not A-5 version. Since A-4 all versions had antenna mast on stabilizer, while earlier had the antenna wire mounted to the top of the stabilizer, without the mast. Also, since A-5, aircrafts were 15cm longer, first-aid cover was in different place and ailerons shape was changed. 

Of course nice post +1 for you. :)

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looks like wikipedia.



Negatif. :) pls read source.
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I meant the pilot stories. They're identical to the english wikipedia ones.


Negatif.. www.luftwaffe.cz :)
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Armin Faber
 

Oberleutnant Armin Faber was a Luftwaffe pilot in World War II who mistook the Bristol Channel for the English Channel and landed his Focke-Wulf 190 (Fw-190) intact at RAF Pembrey in south Wales. His plane was the first Fw-190 to be captured by the Allies and was tested to reveal any weaknesses that could be exploited.[1]

 


23 June 1942

In June 1942, Oberleutnant Armin Faber was Gruppen-Adjutant to the commander of the III fighter Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 2 (JG 2) based in Morlaix in Brittany. On 23 June, he was given special permission to fly a combat mission with 7th Staffel. The unit operated Focke-Wulf 190 fighters.


220px-Fw_190A-3_JG_2_in_Britian_1942.jpg

magnify-clip.png
Faber's Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-3 of III/JG 2 at RAF Pembrey, June 1942.

The FW-190 had only recently arrived with front line units at this time and its superior performance had caused the Allies so many problems that they were considering mounting a commando raid on a French airfield to capture one for evaluation.

 

 

Armin Faber

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Oberleutnant Armin Faber was a Luftwaffe pilot in World War II who mistook the Bristol Channel for the English Channel and landed his Focke-Wulf 190 (Fw-190) intact at RAF Pembrey in south Wales. His plane was the first Fw-190 to be captured by the Allies and was tested to reveal any weaknesses that could be exploited.[1]

Contents
23 June 1942

In June 1942, Oberleutnant Armin Faber was Gruppen-Adjutant to the commander of the III fighter Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 2 (JG 2) based in Morlaix in Brittany. On 23 June, he was given special permission to fly a combat mission with 7th Staffel. The unit operated Focke-Wulf 190 fighters.

220px-Fw_190A-3_JG_2_in_Britian_1942.jpg
magnify-clip.png
Faber's Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-3 of III/JG 2 at RAF Pembrey, June 1942.

The FW-190 had only recently arrived with front line units at this time and its superior performance had caused the Allies so many problems that they were considering mounting a commando raid on a French airfield to capture one for evaluation.

Then your Source copied from wikipedia ;) (or other way^^)

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This is not inculude main topic. This is answer for other comment. :)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for the story, UberJager.

The details about roll rates and turn fight performance pretty much defines how great the machine was, and answers a lot of questions for me.

In the end, the better pilot wins, especially with machines having such toe-to-toe performances.

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priller3.jpg

    #SWAG#

Haha sry for posting this but i cant stop laughting since i saw that. Anyway nice post , looking forward for more ^^ +1

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have anyone read Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown's post war evaluation of the FW 190 series and TA 152, he spoke very favourably about both aircraft

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Little extra info not present in the OP

 

Faber's Fw190A3 was due to an engine overhaul shortly after the mission he botched by landing in the wrong side of the channel. That plane's BMW801D2 went through an extensive test period and logged long hours of flight without the long overdue overhaul, and as a result when the plane to plane mock fights happened and the tests which results are described conducted, had developed faulty spark plugs that messed the plane performance. hence the "rough engine" report that got pilots so nervous.

 

Not to mention that it was an engine derated (intentionally "limited" not to unleash full power) to 1580hp instead of the 1750hp it was supposed to deliver. At that time the Fw190A superiority was so marked over any British fighter, Spitfire Mk.IX included (as proven by the air combats during Cerberus and Dieppe) that the engine powers were usually limited by the germans in order to improve their serviceability mean life between engine overhauls, because the plane actually ruled over the british fighters even with derated engines so the extra performance loss caused by the derating was deemed acceptable in light on how superior the plane was even running with a limited powerplant.

 

If that plane compared well with the fighters it was pitted against, now try to figure out how it'd have compared had it's full power available, and had it's engine been properly maintained. And it says a lot about the engine reliability that even after dozens of hours overdue for an engine overhaul, it still was running well enough to conduct those tests without breaking down.

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'At that time the Fw190A superiority was so marked over any British fighter, Spitfire Mk.IX included (as proven by the air combats during Cerberus and Dieppe)'

 

Cerberus was before the Spitfire MKIX even flew.  At Dieppe 42 out of the 48 Spitfire squadrons were MkV's.  Only 4 squadrons out of 48 were MKIXs. Using these two as examples of the FW190A superiority over the Spitfire MKIX is a fallacy.  Especially since the Spitfires only had about 5-10mins of fuel over Dieppe and a third of the allied losses were from flak/accidents and not from fighters resulting in the allies losing a ratio of 2.2:1 aircraft of all types.

 

Eric Brown himself states them equal, saying 'Here were apparently two aircraft that were so evenly matched that the skill of the pilot became a vital factor in combat supremacy. Skill in aerial combat does, however, mean flying an aircraft to its limits, and when the performance of the enemy is equal to one's own, then the handling characteristics become vital in seeking an advantage. The Focke-Wulf had one big advantage over the Spitfire Mk IX in that it possessed an appreciably higher rate of roll, but the Achilles Heel that the AFDU had sought with Armin Faber's Focke-Wulf was its harsh stalling characteristics which limited its manoeuvre margins.'

 

'both were durable and technically superb, and if each had not been there to counter the other, then the balance of air power could have been dramatically altered at a crucial period in the fortunes of both combatants.”'

 

Eric Brown is very respectable on such matters.  The FW190A was also really limited to around 24000ft whilst the MarkIX had good high altitude performance. 

 

Good article by the way:)

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  • 1 year later...

would the A-3 be good for a British tier 2/3 prem?

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